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A new independent poll conducted by Insightrix Research, Inc. shows a sizeable majority of Saskatchewan residents (77%) oppose the United States Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v. Wade and no longer provide a federal constitutional right to an abortion....
 

When planning and advocating for community change, supporting your strategic decision-making with market research survey data collected from the diverse residents you serve will only help form a more profound commitment to important issues. When conducting primary research, the ability to capture data on targeted segments can quickly state the differences between neighbourhoods and communities using survey data. For example, profiling demographics on their annual household income, accessibility to the downtown core, transportation services, walk score, historical and heritage buildings, environmental factors unique to areas, etc., can only enhance the research study. In addition, neighbourhood survey data can allow residents (who are directly affected by the community planning) to have their say on what directly impacts them. Neighbourhoods are unique in supporting resident engagement studies. Anyone who has ever considered launching a new community program knows firsthand that neighbourhood boundaries can define attitudes, lifestyles, demographics, income, beliefs, community conditions and trends. It can also affect how a survey is conducted with its local constituents. With the internet, the accessibility of reach has expanded beyond its physical markers - allowing municipalities, community organizations and Governments to access survey data at the local level. Yet, in many cases in Canada and especially in central Canada (where there are fewer people per capita and in less populated areas), reaching a local audience down to the neighbourhood level can be tricky compared to more densely populated urban centres. The internet is no silver bullet to ensure a higher survey response. Still, when it comes to gathering insights from an audience at your neighbourhood level, it is crucial to explore all cost-effective and innovative approaches while prioritizing accurate and representative results. In terms of reaching out to more localized audiences, there are several practices that community planners and researchers can follow: Achieving Higher Local Representation in Targeted Areas In market research, particularly in areas where strategic and community planning needs to be so heavily accountable and influenced by representative statistics, it is critical to provide decision-makers with access to a credible sample of respondents who understand the nature of the problems we are trying to improve. For example, suppose you were interested in surveying residents regarding the location of a future leisure centre. In that case, you may want to design the questionnaire to establish what matters to those who reside closest to the potential locations of interest - this may include local business owners, citizens within a specific kilometre radius, or legacy residents who have expressed concerns over the influx of neighbourhood traffic. Establishing a targeted sample distribution to include the desired and most directly impacted respondents' concerns fuels a higher response rate and provides more significant potential for valuable insights and direction for the success of your plans. In addition, the targeted respondents will likely understand the issue at hand. For example, not everyone is an expert in basket weaving! Consider a Respondent Panel One method of ensuring the opinions of niche segments are captured is using an online respondent panel. A respondent panel is a great resource for uncovering the complexity of neighbourhood survey data, such as researching niche markets like newcomers, young adults, agriculture professionals or even sports enthusiasts! Well-established respondent panels are often made of new explorers in the market or seasoned consumers who have shown loyalty to their community, companies, and brands they engage with. Some respondent panels cannot only target the general population but can also quota segments of the population, focusing on niche audiences with geographic regions. Like SaskWatch Research®, a proprietary online community with more than 18 thousand Saskatchewan residents. Since 2008, Insightrix has dedicated time and resources to ensuring SaskWatch Research collects more than 100 different profile variables that can support businesses interested in the Saskatchewan population and beyond. One of the key benefits of using a respondent panel to conduct market research is to cross-tabulate profile variables and benefit from deeper insights collected from respondents using rich demographic data. Collecting Neighbourhood Survey Demographic Data Respondent panels are supported by collecting demographics of all levels. For community decision-makers, neighbourhood demographics are critical to social and infrastructure planning specific to household composition, annual or individual income, home ownership vs. renting, multi-car households, children still living at home, etc. Urban data collected using neighbourhood surveys can play a role in how one neighbourhood may support an up-and-coming community centre or economic development project. Demographic data can build a foundation for understanding neighbourhoods as they exist and where they're heading. It can be a powerful tool for tracking change over time and identifying a community's needs or strengths to inform planning, policy development or decision-making. Collecting neighbourhood demographic data can also provide a benchmark statistic for whether a strategy or policy made a difference with the target audience. In addition, it can help shed light on characteristics or unique qualities that might advocate for community-focused programs, outreach priorities, marketing initiatives, and grant writing. In many cases, grant applications call for information about the local community, the target population, or a specific audience that might benefit from the activity or work funded by the grant. Targeting urban populations to conduct research has never been easier. Here are five ways to start investigating at the neighbourhood level using survey data (online, by telephone or in-person!): Tap into working knowledge of a community or a population to reveal important social or economic events such as the relocation of a business headquarters, or a significant business shutting down Perceptions of a new infrastructure project and the impacts of two years' worth of construction will have on community residents. Anecdotal information (like a new housing development plan that seems to be attracting retirees) Talk to service providers (community-based organizations) to get real-time information on the populations of interest Conduct a local survey that addresses the specific needs of your community and highlights differences and similarities between other neighbourhoods Presenting key neighbourhood statistics back to the public and in other marketing or communication campaigns in a way that makes citizens come together Interview local leaders and experts and ask if they have suggestions on those who should be included in the study to ensure their response is included Blending neighbourhood survey data and local knowledge can lead to actionable information, and analysis can be used for all types of community-based initiatives and preparing for (or responding to) local change. As a market research industry leader, we are proud to offer our Saskatchewan clients (and clients outside of Saskatchewan) the ability to collect this type of information and the opportunity for local citizens to impact what is happening in their neighbourhoods and communities directly. To find out more about how our respondent panel has supported advocacy and local initiatives or about municipal, community, online panels, or neighbourhood segmentation, contact us! ...
 

April 19, 2022 - A recent survey was done with 802 Saskatchewan residents that touched on top-of-mind key issues and hopes for 2022. The survey was conducted by Insightrix Research in April 2022 using SaskWatch Research, its online research panel. The following are six key takeaways from the survey:   Additionally, we asked residents to look back to March 2020 and share perspectives on how things have changed since the beginning of the pandemic.    As a province, top-of-mind key issues include: Are more selfish and concerned about our individual needs (56%) Are more aware of others' needs or those less fortunate around us (40%) Haven't learned anything from the pandemic (39%) Have come together for the greater good (30%) State of Saskatchewan: Saskatchewan residents' Top-of-Mind Key Issues To get a qualitative sense of what Saskatchewan residents' top-of-mind key issues are, Insightrix hit the streets of Saskatoon about critical issues and their hope for the province for 2022. Want to learn more about critical issues in Saskatchewan?  For more information on our recent April OnTopic release, email info@insightrix.com. Want to learn more about our omnibus service? Visit: https://insightrix.com/omnibus-surveys/  We regularly post new data and analyses on Saskatchewan's perceptions. Visit our website for more information.  ...
 

March 25, 2022 - Insightrix recently conducted a poll of 800 Saskatchewan residents to gain insight into the impact of increased food prices on individuals. Notably, we discovered that on average, residents cite a 20% to 30% increase in their household grocery bill.  Given the overall sentiment, Saskatchewan residents say they are generally more concerned about their household grocery expenses because of inflation. The top concerns cited by residents due to inflating food prices include affordability / being able to stay within their existing budget (52%), making sure they can eat healthy/quality food (24%), and that the general price of food will continue to increase (17%). Overall, Saskatchewan residents indicate a recent change to purchase behaviours due to the rise in food prices, with 62% of residents saying they are now buying 'different or less or lowered priced brands' than they were previously. Significant changes in behaviours are especially noted for those who say they have decreased how often they eat out at a restaurant (59%) or order take-out (49%).   Impact of Inflation on Food Prices in Saskatchewan Vox Pop To get a qualitative sense of how Saskatchewan residents are feeling, Insightrix hit the streets of Saskatoon to ask how inflation is affecting grocery bills in everyday households.  https://youtu.be/LGHfw_S--N4 Want to know more about this month's OnTopic release?  hbspt.forms.create({ region: "na1", portalId: "374811", formId: "2caa8378-11c6-4a81-a470-2263e18e14c1" }); ...
 

Here we are again—2022, but perhaps with a little less optimism and a lot more hope? Another fresh start in front of us, as marketers, as brands, as customers and citizens, we are given an opportunity— Yes, it's exciting, but what now? Many of us are ready to put that strategy together but are still dealing with uncertainty every day. In some cases, we look to the recent past for guidance, as things have changed dramatically, and they continue to change— rapidly! For example, how do we know who to target if we want to launch a new product in 2022? Since 2020 it's hard to fully depend on our existing market segmentation reports because it feels as if so much has changed. This includes the way people shop, live, eat, travel, and who they spend money with. As brands, we must refine our segments, or at the very least, seek confirmation of the old segments to help us understand how these behaviours hold up. Here are some common segmentation questions we hear: How will my market segmentation hold up? Will my current breakdown of my customers still be relevant? Without question, the pandemic has a significant impact on people's lifestyles and their mindsets and also their priorities. But, as we continue to cope with changing government mandates, lessening of restrictions, and returning to a "normal," it's anyone's guess what we'll have to adapt next as consumers. Meaning the way we used to act or think could have shifted, and what was previously necessary to us may have become less so. Getting a Pulse On Your Current Segmentation Getting a pulse on your current segmentation is critical to regaining trust in your strategy and focusing on the key indicators that define how it may have changed. It's better to know now if your segments are no longer relevant than to find out after spending thousands on a new product launch that it missed the mark, or worse, missed the opportunity to target the ideal customer. The key is not to disregard your existing segmentation as ineffective but rather to view it as a baseline. In other words, a peek into where we've been and where we might want to go. Perhaps existing segments may still be relevant. Still, your consumer outlook on how they want to be reached has shifted drastically, such as the rise in the use of TikTok during the pandemic. Our Syndicated Research Study, The Insightrix Media Usage Report: Answering Your Advertising Questions shows that in 2021, TikTok became one of the fastest-rising social media platforms in Saskatchewan. In this case, it might be helpful to re-run the same segmentation with the same methodology to see what's changed and validate that where we are focusing our strategy and spending is where we should be. Assurance in our data and decisions Since the size of each segment has shifted, our priority customer group may be less relevant when it comes to the dollars we want to spend on marketing, or perhaps this group is more prominent now. Suppose we already anticipate changes or the re-run of our existing segmentation highlights considerable new information. In that case, it may be time to reevaluate our methodology, develop a new set of statements, and ultimately redefine our customer base. Here are some key questions to ask when deciding if your market segmentation is relevant: Does my framework suddenly not "fit" with how society is being asked to live its lives? For example, is your primary segment based on how many hours one spent commuting to work or attending outdoor concerts/events? Is there a decrease or increase in a particular segment over time? For example, does your traditional tracking study indicate that more males aged 34-45 are interested in your brand, and were these demographics previously in a secondary or tertiary segment where you did not spend key market dollars? This may indicate that your primary segment has shifted. If you need help in looking at your tracking data to identify some of these key changes, we are happy to help! 😄 *Has there been a significant change to the marketplace you used to 'play' in? For example, were your goods/products primarily purchased face-to-face before Covid-19? Are your customers now seeking alternative ways to buy the same product, expanding the competitive landscape in which you used to play? *Note* This may not mean your segmentation is irrelevant, and certain things like purchasing behaviour can easily be verified using other methods by running a quick pulse study with a primary segment. If you answered yes to any of the first three questions, it might be time to dig a little deeper into your existing segmentation and evaluate its relevance. Reviewing segmentation typing tools to help answer the following two key questions: Do any of the current statements in the typing tool represent certain behaviours that your target audience cannot engage in right now but are likely to resume later?Are any of the current statements insensitive to the current environment? Perhaps the segmentation is still relevant, but at the very least, the target segments you have been working with are likely to have shifted. Consider conducting a profiling survey to help redefine the size of these segments. Right now, we're all in a world of flux. Things are changing, and if the last two years have taught us anything, we need to adapt quickly. To discuss segmentation and profiling more, please contact Insightrix Research at info@insightrix.com.    ...
 

Hybrid work means re-examining how the office space functions as employees flow between home and the office. Hybrid work environments can provide new ways for employees to collaborate productively, but companies must intentionally create these opportunities. At Insightrix, we've designed our new office to do just that, creating spaces to drive collaboration and innovation within this new style of working! This includes “resomercial” design approaches, state-of-the-art video conferencing technology, and flexible hot desking. The minute we received the keys to our new space, we got to work from the ground up. Every small detail of our environment prioritizes a future in hybrid working - from the infrastructure to the furniture to culture and philosophy at Insightrix. We are excited to share with you the fruits of our labour. Thank you to Golden Media House for producing this mini-documentary on the new Insightrix Research Hybrid Workspace.  Special thanks to: (in order as they appear)Corrin Harper, President at Insightrix Sharday Torgerson, Creative and Digital Strategist at InsightrixLevon Fleming, Architectural/Technology Specialist at Business FurnishingsBrandon Gay, Design Associate and Project Director at Metric Design Golden Media House, Insightrix staff, our neighbours at The Monarch, and those who helped bring our hybrid workspace to life.  ...
 

As two world-class organizations, the Saskatchewan Roughriders and Insightrix Research have many responsibilities within their communities. This video highlights how Saskatchewan businesses like Insightrix and the Roughriders can support one another, on and off the field. The strong partnership between Insightrix and the Roughriders affirms our commitment to ensure strong economic recovery initiatives as we continue to provide research activities to support local businesses. ...
 

Without members, your organization would look fundamentally different altogether. Yet, even when you understand how critical your current members are, sometimes it is easy to focus on the products and services your business provides above your member's interests. Your team may be focused on improving your products to generate more memberships. And the dedication to improvement is admirable if you consider that a satisfying member experience can lead to an ace member loyalty program. Nevertheless, if your member does not like the current experience you offer or thinks you don't care about them as an individual, they can quickly move on to your competitor. The same is true if they feel they share the same values as your association. To truly align your values with your core customer, it's essential to focus on membership growth while learning how every touchpoint affects the overall perception of your brand. Member Research is Intelligent Member research is intelligent and can be hugely actionable. Member research can gather information to align your brand values with your member expectations. When it all boils down, good member research encourages organizations to take the feedback given by their member - or potential member - and reinvest it back into the organization. Businesses that rely on memberships have historically used market research to understand their member motivations and behaviours. For example, perhaps you are a not-for-profit that relies on members for annual funding. Picture your value proposition evolving due to industry pressures coming from new consumer behaviours. Perhaps you are interested in segmenting your member base to ensure the benefits offered are communicated to the right person. In all aspects, there is a case for member research. Membership-building Efforts When Marketing General Inc. (MGI) surveyed associations for its Membership Marketing Benchmarking Report*, it was reported that regardless of the membership type, almost half of the associations described a decline in overall memberships in 2019 (47%). Sadly, but not unexpectedly, many member-centric businesses took a hit to their membership over the pandemic. Yet despite current events, one in four (45%) associations report that they successfully grew membership in 2020. Moreover, compared to associations reporting membership declines, associations that reported increases in membership over the past five years are more likely to have a specific process in place to support innovation (22% vs. 17%) or are working on developing a strategy for innovation and new ideas (28% vs. 25%). To try and build on member growth, developing a strategy for innovation and new ideas can come from many avenues of business, including market research. Personalize Your Member Recruitment Strategy While it goes without saying, a key driver in any membership growth is an effective membership recruitment strategy. There are many ways to intensify your member recruitment efforts. However, while most member-driven organizations have established processes for membership growth, these work plans habitually offer little to no benefit, that is, without understanding your member and their needs. Additionally, even the best marketing strategies require consistent creative modifications to respond to the unanticipated changes in the marketplace – and membership experience (MX) programs are no different. Communicating Membership Value Are you effectively getting the word out to members about their benefits? Or does your membership value proposition need some tuning up? Associations with a focus on membership growth are always trying to innovate membership benefits. These brands understand the importance of using member feedback to learn about the interests and the behaviours directly from the source. As a result, these organizations build MX programs that are often well-targeted by different segments. These programs, in turn, offer their membership the type of products and services specific to them and their needs as a member.   When an organization is genuinely member-centric at its core, its values and business values align with its member base. Potential members can sense marketing fluff from a mile away, and it is not enough to assume who your core member is or what they like. Society is changing, and so is your member profile. Communicating value to your member can no longer fit into bullet-point lists on on-site pamphlets – they must be expressed in a way that your members understand and the way your members can appreciate. Members Come First   Organizations that rely on members for their association to succeed must genuinely believe that the member comes first. Treat your members the way they want to be treated – like valued members. But more than that, they want to know that you value them as real human beings, not just another number. Invest in your members by getting feedback directly from them. Understand their needs instantly from them. It's critical member-centric organizations implement feedback into their communication to show that you've listened and you've heard what they've told you. Members want to belong to your organization, and it is essential to let them feel the emotional engagement, which builds loyalty. Being a member-first organization is not something you fulfill through marketing messaging. It is something you live, breathe, and do.  Market Research for Credit Unions For more information on the work that Insightrix does in this area, please get in touch with us. We would love to discuss the extensive work in this area – with associations, not-for-profits, post-secondary, and financial institutions and banks. While you're at it, check out our new whitepaper on how member-driven institutions like financial credit unions can use research to personalize their member experience program. Get your free whitepaper here.   ...
 

"The only way to win is to learn faster than anyone else." – Eric Ries There's a rite of passage book for business courses called "The Lean Startup: How Today's Entrepreneurs Use Continuous Innovation to Create Radically Successful Businesses" by Eric Ries. And one of the critical components to Ries's strategy was to understand the Build-Measure-Learn Feedback Loop. The feedback loop serves as a scientific model for businesses to realize that creating value by testing ideas is essential. By using the Build-Measure-Learn approach, businesses can focus on eliminating uncertainty, so they can fail fast, and most importantly, fail cheaply. The Lean Startup approach shows brands how to find ways to continuously approve on their business aproach by creating a cycle of testing and building, measuring to learn from the results. By using testing to support your R&D can allow for further experiment or iteration, and eventually, offer detailed specifications on how to build, use, or enhance it. Honestly, advertising research is no different. Like the Build-Measure-Learn feedback loop, ad testing can let businesses act fast, agile and efficient when it comes to product or creative testing.  Let's dive into how marketers can look at advertising research through the same lens as Eric Ries' Feedback Loop. Advertising and the Feedback Loop Applying the Lean Startup Approach to ad research is quite simple. Use the feedback loop to build your advertisements (build), ensure they are engaging with the right audience (measure), validate assumptions and apply the insights to your entire campaign or marketing mix (learn). When building an advertisement campaign, is it not essential to clearly define the strategic objective? What is the motivation for developing the ad campaign? This stage is where testing ideas are important. In addition, this may be where you employ several market research techniques to further your insights exploration to help inspire new ways of understanding how your brand, product, or service may appeal to the masses. One goal of ad testing is to ensure it provides insights that help move your ads from creative to production. Often, the first stage of advertising research is the broadest.  And compared to other methods of advertising research, this stage is often exploratory. When undertaking advertisement development market research, conduct an audit of existing research could help reduce costs. It will also increase your campaign's engagement and help you identify need areas without breaking the bank. Building advertisement creative from a gut check is rarely a good idea. And a common mistake by creative teams is to ignore existing research in hopes that fresh eyes will find new ways to validate the content. To combat personal biases, brands will often hire a market research firm to summarize mounds of secondary research that already exists or perform other advertisement pre-testing methods, such as concept research or product market research. Pre-testing can give your creative team the feedback required to understand how to improve the execution of your campaign. When testing a more drafted version of your advertisement, such as the copy, creative or storyboard, the pre-testing can flag what is required to improve the final campaign's execution. This type of feedback is key to measuring the effectiveness of the overall ad design and other budget needs like where the advertisement should be, how the media buy should be spent, and if the testing is just for one variation or the entire campaign. While there are many turnkey frameworks available for pre-testing, businesses will often work with market research firms to structure their concept research around ad effectiveness, recall, engagement, and predictive buying behaviour among their target audiences. Market research firms can even support your pre-testing by helping identify your target personas and showing how to target them based on various segmentation methods.   "If we do not know who the customer is, we do not know what quality is." – Eric Ries, The Lean Startup Learn When to Pivot Advertising research is not meant to hold up your campaign launch. But, even more importantly, it should not end when you launch your campaign. Marketing strategy often requires continuous evaluation and feedback, and advertising research is no different. Thus the research should be viewed as a large part of the overall strategy, and it should continue to provide actionable results after launch. Think about it this way: when you think about campaign evaluation, you think about all aspects of the ad campaign – your media buy, channels used, materials developed, and even societal factors that can affect your results. When you are learning to pivot, you need to plan for post-testing or continuous benchmarking. Advertisement research lets you set those benchmarks and test against them for recall throughout the entire campaign. Of course, shorter initiatives may not require testing after launch. But long-term campaigns with various channels, messages, and stakeholders may require a more continuous approach – like a feedback loop, perhaps? Advertising market research is essential to successful advertising. Research can help you reduce the risk and the cost associated with developing new research – should it ever have to come to that. Although there are many stages of advertising research, ad testing allows marketers to create their continuous feedback loop. It can simplify the creative process in a way that helps marketers determine where they need to focus their ideas (build), what benchmarks they should track (measure), and when they should adjust the creative or move on (learn, and repeat!). Advertising Research should do more than test your creative - it should help define the future success of the message you are trying to get in front of your customers.  If you would like to know more about how Insightrix can help you create more effective advertising using advertisement market research, contact us at info@insightrix.com. If you're interested in more information about the types of ad testing services Insightrix provides, download the whitepaper here.   Advertising Research - How Important is it?  Catch EP07 of SoMR where we explore why organizations test their ads, and how the practice has changed over the years.  ...