What's the difference? The terms data visualization and data representation can be easy to confuse. They sound pretty similar, and at first glance, one may find it's tricky to keep the two straight. And since data is ubiquitous these days, we are seeing more examples of both almost everywhere from our watches and fitness bands to the apps on our phones and dashboards on our computers.  Both have been employed in insights research and reporting for some time and they both fulfill specific functions. They both sound pretty similar, too, and they do similar things – it’s no wonder how it can be hard keeping data visualization and data representation straight. So, we've created a new downloadable infographic to explain the differences between the two and how they are used. We've been using it around our offices to help our researchers and data professionals explain the styles of data representation or data visualizations we might utilize in our reports. We've also been employing it to work with research professionals who are new to the field to help them also become acquainted with the uses and development of both - and now it's available for you to download for your own use! Scroll to the bottom of this article to download the infographic right away, or read on to learn more about the differences between data visualization and data representation for market research. Data visualization crunches numbers Putting it simply, data visualization is the process of taking information and representing it graphically. Common in insights and market research reporting, data visualization makes it easier to communicate the story in the data. When one is looking at a complex, large and perhaps varied data set, data visualization can be a great choice to impart that data story in a way that can be quickly and easily understood. Data visualizations are developed programmatically; that means they are built through the use of software. Think Google Maps or complex GIS systems - they crunch large data sets through sometimes sophisticated algorithms to find trends and correlations in the data, producing interactive representations that allow one to communicate or understand data more easily. Common examples of data visualizations include heat maps, streamgraphs and word clouds. Download your own copy of our infographic, The Difference Between Data Visualization and Data Representation for Market Research, by filling out the form below to see more data visualization examples and how they are used. Data representations support data reporting Sometimes referred to as infographics, data representations can support almost any kind of data reporting. They allow one to drill down to and communicate the most important parts of a data story graphically. Data representations, unlike data visualizations, are human generated. Design software is employed to build them (like Adobe Creative Suite, Canva or Piktochart), but they require a professional to take an editorial role in deciding which data to include to tell the data story best. Infographics communicate information creatively and stylistically to engage and create memorable experiences. This makes data representation ideal for executive summaries or to highlight key data points that may not be as well communicated in a data table or chart. Some ways data representations are used are in timelines, hierarchical representations, flow charts and comparisons.           Want to know about data visualization? Listen to Ep. 14 of Stories of Market Research: The Insightrix Podcast - it's all about how to use them, best practices on how to build them and more. Always know which to use and when We’ve developed an infographic that will help you remember the differences and uses of both data visualizations and representations. This rich and engaging chart offers insights into how both visualizations are representations are used and why, as well as the most common forms of both. You can hold onto it to refer to later, or share it to help teach others about infographics and visualizations. Go ahead - put it on your wall and never be unsure which chart or graphic to use to tell your next data story! Fill out the form below to access your own copy of The Difference Between Data Representation and Data Visualization for Market Research infographic.   Want to access the entire infographic? Fill out the form below to receive an email to download your own PDF copy.   hbspt.forms.create({ portalId: "374811", formId: "ae9b4751-7c2e-41f9-bde5-07da17ec7a90" }); ...
 

Infographics are a memorable, engaging and flexible way to communicate research data These days, data is everywhere. We get it from our televisions, our computers, our phones, our smartwatches and fitness bands – data is ubiquitous. All that data has one thing in common – it must be communicated in a way that can be readily understood, and if necessary, acted upon in ways that achieve results. But data can be hard to consume without visual aids like dashboards or charts and graphs. In fact, most of us would like to know the gist of what the data is saying - because not everyone gets excited about correlation or predictions. We fitness wearable users crave a clean, easy-to-read dashboard. Would Fitbit have succeeded without one? Maybe so, but...
 

Insightrix Holiday Spending 2019 has arrived! What is the Saskatchewan holiday shopping scene looking like for 2019? Did you know that this year, 93% of Saskatchewan residents plan to buy holiday gifts? And what’s more, 78% of those holiday shoppers expect to make at least some of their purchases online.   The holiday shopping experience in Saskatchewan is as unique as the people who live here. So, we’ve developed a web report to let you know just how Saskatchewan shoppers plan to make their holiday purchases this year, how much they expect to spend and where they will be shopping. Whether you need to know because you’re a decision maker in the retail industry, or whether you want to know because you like to keep an eye on what's happening in the Saskatchewan retail marketplace – or even if you’re just someone who is curious, Insightrix Holiday Spending 2019 has all the Saskatchewan-specific Christmas shopping statistics you'll want. What’s in Insightrix Holiday Spending 2019? Insightrix Holiday Spending 2019 has all of the up-to-date facts about the holiday retail experience in Saskatchewan. What’s more, it is deep on context, containing Saskatchewan holiday shopping intelligence that has been trended from 2015. Find out how just how many Saskatchewan residents expect to buy gifts during the 2019 holiday shopping season and how certain demographics will be spending. Learn about which proportions of residents expect to do their holiday shopping online in 2019 and who expects to do their shopping locally in brick-and-mortar stores. More than just that, you can discover how much residents expect to spend this year, what means of payment they will be using and how that compares to their holiday spending in previous years. Get an understanding of how discounts affect expected holiday shopping behaviour… and much more! You can access Insightrix Holiday Spending 2019 right here on the Insightrix website.   hbspt.cta.load(374811, 'dfa7ed65-a26d-49d3-8eab-a45427eb22c7', {}); ...
 

Adding video responses to your research project can build on your insights story One of the qualitative tools our clients have recently requested more of lately has been the adoption of online video research (video surveys) to tap into consumer behaviours. Video surveys are a powerful tool to evoke customer feedback in a way that is simply unmatched by more traditional approaches than say...
 

Insightrix works with non-profits like the Saskatoon SPCA Insightrix works with non-profits in much the same way it does with for-profit businesses. That’s because non-profits have the same need for market research that any other business or organization has. These needs include brand studies, donor experience surveys, awareness surveys or any number of other forms of research.     Throughout late 2018, Insightrix worked with the Saskatoon SPCA on several projects to help them better serve their community. We are truly happy to work with great non-profit and not-for-profit organizations like the Saskatoon SPCA, and as an organization who loves animals, it was hard for us to think of a better organization to highlight over the holiday season. We couldn't resist sharing our reason for the importance of our research in animal services - our very own Chief Morale officer, Presley, and how much he has contributed to the positive culture at Insightrix. You can watch Insightrix President, Corrin Harper, and the Saskatoon SPCA Executive Director, Patricia Cameron, (and of course Presley) discuss how both organizations worked together, and why it is so important for brands to make better decisions with market research. Video transcript Patricia Cameron: Insightrix is quite a dream, really, to work with. People are friendly - they’re informed. They give you guidance on how to set up this research project. So, I would say it was effortless - and yet, the return was really rich. Obviously, being connected with your community and knowing what people expect, want, like, don’t like – that’s super important for a charity. It’s really the lifeblood of what we do. So, we’ve been able to take the research and immediately apply it to our business plan and our longer-term strategy. Well, we really appreciate that Insightrix is animal friendly, has an office dog and also did a provincial, pro bono survey on a very high-level animal neglect and abuse case. That work was really, really important in highlighting how important animal welfare is in the province, and we really thank Insightrix for that. Corrin Harper: Looking at doing some work in the non-profit sector, the SPCA was a connection both in terms of the importance of what we care about here, being animals, and also our everyday work that we do in research. That was a really nice connection and something I think we thought we could really get behind. Presley’s role, I mean, his official title is Chief Morale Officer and Head of Security. But in reality, he is just a mainstay here at Insightrix. He is something that cheers everybody up everyday. He just comes in and visits staff. He’s just, basically, here to make everybody feel comfortable and have a little bit of fun at work, as well. I was coming back into the city from a weekend at the lake, and saw this little, dark spot on the highway. I realized it was a little dog, so I pulled over to the side of the road, picked him up and put him into the car and drove him into the city. And as I was driving into the city, I was started to get a little bit of attached to him. So, I brought him into the office and staff just loved him, and he just sort of took to the place. And I think he kind of hit the doggie lottery because he gets to come to work every day, he gets treats during the day – I think he ended up with a pretty good life. Being president of a market research firm really gives a great opportunity to sort of help people out and I think that’s one of the passions that, I guess, myself and I’m sure a lot of the staff here have is being able to get up every day, come to work and help people make better decisions as a result of the information you’re providing. Whether that is for-profit business or a charity, it’s something that we can be passionate about, as well. Video by The Golden Media Company Learn more about other Insightrix projects through our case studies....
 

You could be doing research for your small business Getting the chance to ask research questions for your business is often thought to be beyond the ability of most small and medium-sized businesses (SMB). Market research, while desperately needed for SMB, can be considered a lower priority when determining what an SMB should or should not spend money. With the constant need to probe, learn and collect intelligence for businesses – in an economy where everyone is trying to market their product effectively – research should not be the first budget item on the chopping block. Especially when market research companies offer cost-saving alternatives to custom research projects like omnibus research. Not only is market research a necessity for all levels and types of business – it could also save further investment down the road and have a major impact on the brand. Getting actionable insights from asking the right research questions can be both affordable and accessible to all businesses who need a pulse check.  The question is, what are some best practices to employ to create good research questions that yield actionable results? Actionable market research needs to start out right It isn’t always easy to find the right place to start a market research project. It may be there are many ideas for research that come to mind. But a good place to get rolling is to decide the exact research questions you would like to have answers for. Market research isn’t always about uncovering the hidden insights that you never knew before you started – it is also to help clarify or validate what you already knew.     Think about it this way… As an SMB, start by asking, “What kind of market intelligence is it that I want or need for my business?” or “What evidence am I after to clarify my business or marketing strategy?” Let’s say you are a business developer or a marketing specialist for a tech company. You are ready to start concept testing on a new feature of the product but do not know if your customers are interested or ready in such a feature. You may rely on your general understanding of how the product works to prepare the lot of questions in ways that make sense to you - but will that yield actionable results? You may come up with questions like… -or- But take a minute. Are these questions going to yield actionable results for the business or marketing strategy?   Think about the answers when reading the question; will it help you define if your customers like the new feature(s)? Sure. Will it help determine if the new feature is right for your customers? Perhaps not. Questions, questions… Formulating questions that need to be answered, based on the research topic, is a problem waiting to be solved. As an insights agency, we encourage our clients to deliver us their questions monthly to be included in our omnibus. And our omnibus functions as a lean research tool for businesses that need quick results. Whether it is pre-determined market intelligence that requires questions developed to explore, or if you already have research questions that need answering, our consultants can help in the formulation and fielding of omnibus research that will yield relevant and actionable information.  But before you contact your market research provider, we’ve provided some hints you can use when coming up with your own research questions. Ask research questions that can be answered. Before starting to try to answer a question, it must first be determined whether there is the time or resources available to conduct the research in the first place. Let’s go back to our first example… Finding out which age groups engage with your product or what your customers want from the new features are questions that can be easily answered! But determining the factors of influence that led your customers to be interested in your product in the first place may not be (with this level of research, at least!). Ask one question at a time. Compound questions should be avoided. Asking questions around “if they use your product” and “at what times” may seem like a good place to start the survey, but asking questions like these at the same time or all at once will result in answers that are confusing and uninformative. It is always better to ask single, succinct questions to avoid confusing your customers. Review the research questions thoroughly. Before consulting your research provider, make sure to investigate with your developers to know how your product works, and with sales managers to know its selling points. While you consult your pros, you will still need to develop your own perspective that will help validate the need for your questions.   Be straightforward. If your responding customers do not know what the research question is asking, the response given won’t be of any use to inform the insights gathered at the end of research. Avoid the use of confusing words or language – keep questions as simple and as short as possible, and try to be specific about what it is that is being asked. Avoid research questions like, “Do you like to eat a lot?” Instead, stick to questions like, “At what times of day do you usually eat?” Being specific like this will lead to less confusion for customers, providing actionable market intelligence that relates directly to the research at hand. Provide restrictive and extensive response options. When setting up multiple choice research questions, be sure to make choices exhaustive (they cover all possible choices to the question asked) and restrictive (one answer cannot be mistaken for another by the respondent). In a question like, “What is your annual net income after taxes?”, an example of a restrictive and extensive series of responses could be: In a series of responses like this, virtually all possible options are covered and none of the answer categories can be said to overlap with the others. Setting up research questions so they are restrictive and extensive will not only provide a wide range of detailed data to work with, it will avoid biasing, or presupposing the answers respondents will provide before they are asked. Give your respondents an out. Some respondents may not feel comfortable answering all research questions. If inquiring about demographic information like household income, gender, etc., or looking to gather other sensitive information, it is often a good idea to provide a “Prefer not to answer” option to respondents. Giving responding customers an opportunity to opt out of questions will keep more of them answering (instead of dropping out entirely) and will limit them giving inaccurate responses only to proceed in the survey (resulting in unreliable data). On top of this, the number of those who preferred not to answer questions is still valuable data that can used in finding insight into the research topic. Balance the scale of available responses. Think long and hard about the scale upon which responding customers will answer survey questions. Points on scales should be equally distant from one another in concept or number from one another. Meaning - always avoid response scales that do not measure the same thing. If the question were to be asked, “How would you rate your experience with my company’s product?”, it doesn’t make sense to ask customers to rate their experience on a scale of 1 – Excellent. The first response is a number; the second is a feeling. Both are much different in concept, and using them both in the same scale would not just confuse responding customers, but it would also confuse the data gathered from their responses. If the research question requires a scaled response, stick to easy-to-use scales of one to ten, or scales that involve concepts that are very easily understood at first reading. Pitch your questions to a market research firm for consultation.  Now that you know what you want to research, and you have some great research questions ready to ask, it never hurts to call in a pro to validate the direction and scope of the research before committing to the investment of time and resources to the project. Market research firms like Insightrix are experts in their field and are both accessible and affordable to all levels of business. Whether to validate a specific project, or to inform a project from its beginning, engaging a market research firm at the outset for a consultation will result in more focused research (saving your business both time and money), and will provide more actionable data when the research is done.  What's more, when you access the experience of a market research firm, you'll be sure your research project is overseen by a third party, ensuring the project design and the data it produces are free from any bias - either real or imagined by others.  Doing good research is within reach Creating market research, formulating research topics, deciding on methodologies, crafting the perfect research questions, etc. can all be heavy lifting at first, but if you stick to the tips above, the process can be made much less arduous. Do you have a question or an idea for a research topic for your business? Insightrix OnTopic omnibus surveys allow any size or type of business to ask a research question affordably. Using either the SaskWatch or ManitobaWatch online research panels, the OnTopic service can ask your question or questions for you and provide you the intelligence your business needs at a fraction of the cost of undertaking a research project yourself – and benefit from the insight and survey design experience of seasoned pros. ...
 

  Trended data specific to Saskatchewan Since 2016, Insightrix has been tracking the use of social media by Saskatchewan residents and their social lives online to understand how they engage with one another and with brands and businesses, and to find out their preferences and the ways they use the platforms themselves. When the Saskatchewan Social Media Report (2016) was published – it was presented at workshops and conferences across Western Canada, and more than 200 marketers, business consultants, policy makers and advertisers downloaded the report or benefited from its insight. Many of those who accessed the report say they have used it to validate their marketing initiatives, and as a valuable tool for planning and strategizing.   For the first time, it was possible examine the ways Saskatchewan consumers (aged fourteen years old and older) interact with social media over mobile technologies and the internet, their attitudes toward social networks and their behaviours while using them - and what their preferences might be in the future. And even more important, it became possible to compare those statistics with trended data specific to Saskatchewan social media users. A useful narrative that you can understand  Now, those with interests in the province are able to examine Saskatchewan-specific usage data that have been trended over time and make comparisons to the historical story.  The value of this trended data is obvious when comparing Saskatchewan-specific social media usage data over time. In Saskatchewan, social media use has clearly increased since 2015. Back then, 83% of Saskatchewan residents said they used social networking sites - now, that number has increased to 90% of the people in the province over the age of 14! With evidence like this, it doesn’t take a genius to see that untrended data do not give the whole picture when it comes to social media usage statistics. New to the 2018 Saskatchewan Social Media Report The 2018 Saskatchewan Social Media Report has been slimmed down in terms of raw data and beefed up with digestible and thoughtful insight - and it's been repriced to be accessible to all levels of business in Saskatchewan. Dive into this rich, trended data and actionable insight to learn how the Saskatchewan digital landscape has changed over the years with visualized reporting and a clear narrative that you can understand and use right away. The 2018 Saskatchewan Social Media Report has also added a local chapter dedicated to Saskatchewan brands and how Saskatchewan social media users engage with them. Use the report to find out why residents are following local brands, which industries they are engaged in and what they are looking for in terms of advertisement and brand engagement.  ...
 

Ad testing isn’t a thing of the past It seems like every time forward-thinking marketers bring up ad testing these days, they are dismissed by their older, set-in-their-ways colleagues.  Concerns of cost and timeliness, as well as the idea that ad testing (in nebulously described ways) diminishes the creativity of your advertising efforts are usually at the root of criticism of the practice. While it may have been true at one point – before strides in technology and methodologies were made – practical application has lifted the practice of ad testing out of focus group rooms of the nineties and back into common practice for forward-thinking marketers. This is because ad testing has evolved. While today’s innovating front-line marketers are fixated on the metrics to help justify their advertisement choices, their executives and stakeholders simply want results. Marketers believe ad results should be inherently data driven, but businesses are starting to see the need for their brands to be more daring and better represented in the media, so the expectation is much bigger than a marketer’s projected ROI.   New quantitative techniques and methodologies have been developed to create faster, more credible and more actionable quantitative testing protocols and to build and access deeper, more robust norms - making those criticisms mentioned earlier more than a little invalid and out of date. But is advertisement research really worth the effort? The short answer is...
 

Presentation of Market Research data remains a popular topic   In February of 2015, we published an article called 6 Creative Ways to Present Your Market Research Data that, before we knew it, became one of the most read and shared articles we’ve ever published. Fast-forward two and a half years, and that article is still doing well – still one of the most read and shared articles on our site. Which got us thinking that while the article still holds lots of value, some of the information in it may have gotten a little out of date in the intervening years. So, in the spirit of today’s Hollywood, we’ve decided to reboot it and make it more relevant to current audiences. Therefore, without further ado, we bring you – 6 Creative Ways to Present Your Market Research Data – The Reboot! Let’s get creative, people! With the large amounts of data that market researchers deal with, finding ways to present this information in a creative, interesting way can be a challenge. For years, some researchers have put the onus on the client when it comes to understanding, internalizing and actualizing their reports. Rather than providing concise reporting, in the past, many firms would data dump their clients with unwieldy and hard to follow reporting, thick with data and charts, and thin on actionable insight. There are better ways! Market research reporting can be interesting and assimilable! What follows are 6 creative ways you could be using to present your market research data. 1. Interactive Dashboards Interactive dashboards let you communicate important information to your audience. A dashboard is a visual display of the most significant information from a project. The information appears on a single screen, offering a quick and simple way to monitor and evaluate a study’s progress. Dashboards are a highly effective way to present data to executives who don’t have a lot of time and need to be able to check data at any point in a project. 2. Infographics Unless you’ve been living under a rock (or without an Internet connection), you’ve likely come into contact with lots of infographics over the last couple of years. They illustrate data and combine text, images and design to tell the story of a study. They have become exceedingly popular over the last few years since they present data in an engaging and easy-to-understand manner. Because the are so engaging and easy to grasp with little explanation, they are ideally suited to Internet and social media sharing. This boosts your chances for organic sharing. It’s because of this that Infographics are a great way to drive increased traffic to your website and highlight key elements of your data.   3. Presentation Software The days of coming to meetings with nothing but a few clip art-laden PowerPoint slides are way over (audible cheer!). If you want your data to stand out, try using out-of-the-box presentation software like Customshow or Prezi. These presentation platforms are a way to present information that engages audiences. They visually demonstrate how ideas relate to one another and allow collaboration in virtual space. Prezi and Customshow are cloud-based. So, you can present from your browser, desktop or tablet. Plus, you will always have the most recent version available. Presentation software like these offer visually engaging features such as zooming in and out of images and barrel rolls. This makes your insights both engaging and memorable.     4. Videos & Podcasts Sure, these formats are usually reserved for entertainment. They are also a great way to make your presentation more engaging. Podcasts [like the Insightrix Podcast] provide listeners an opportunity to immerse themselves in the narrative, or story, behind your research. They engage your audience in a way that offers you the opportunity to connect your research and your audience in meaningful ways and are relatively easy and inexpensive to attempt. Videos, on the other hand, let you put a face to your research and make study results more relatable and memorable. Vox pops (or streeter videos) are an effective way to bring research to life. They are video interviews with members of the public in which people speak on camera and tell the viewer what they think and how they feel about a particular subject. Videos and vox pops can supplement both qualitative and quantitative research. They are a compelling way to involve your audience in your research with minimal difficulty. *Pro Tip – Always make sure you have permission to film before setting up in any location.* #5. GIFs (Motion Graphics) GIFs, or motion graphics as they are sometimes called, are very short video clips. Though short, they can be a very impactful way to present your research by helping to create a story around your data. While they can be made up of video footage, they can also be used to create short, repeating slide shows of statistical data. Use of GIFs can help people understand difficult concepts and make your presentation more appealing. 6. Web & Mobile Apps   Everyone has a smartphone these days. As a result, apps are a great way to make your research more accessible to your clients. With a couple of quick taps of the screen, your clients can have access to your research at any time and at any place on their mobile devices. To top it off, the interactive nature of apps lets you control the research data you want to present. Like interactive dashboards, they can be out of the reach of most students and very small firms. That said, they are definitely worth the investment for small to medium firms looking to jazz up their presentations.     Presentation of Market Research Data can be engaging As you can see, presentation of market research data can be engaging - and it doesn't have to be rocket science getting it done. There are lots of other ways you can present your data. These examples are only a couple of ways we've found that have been especially well-received.  Can you think of other ways to present market research data?     ...
 

Customer Experience (CX) programs are constantly evolving past solely obtaining data to score or measure a persona or journey-type. To best create a customer journey map, your organization needs to Dive Deep into the different channels you use, all while learning to incorporate new-found insights into the program. Easier said than done, right!? Well… sort of. You must take the first step to capturing their customer experience – both the consumer and your client-facing employees – to make the customer-centric journey successful. To do this – simply – listen. Forming a deep understanding of your end-to-end customer experience is a powerful tool to enhance your competitive advantage. Your customers hold the key to your insights, and your client-facing employees can fill in the gaps in consumer understanding. Journey mapping can also help organizations employ techniques that are built to measure and that are designed effectively – and situationally – to help your executives “buy-in” to the CX “moments of truth”. So, knowing this -  how do professionals responsible for CX go beyond the standard approach of mapping only individual touchpoints? Let’s dive in. 1. The answer is in qualitative research Journey mapping is made through both customer research and employee understanding. And qualitative research assists by providing that “outside” perspective that should always include both the customers’ and employees' views. As a critical starting phase of any CX program (CXP), journey mapping – with the aid of qualitative techniques – should define the customer scope rather than the organization scope. Your customer’s journey should begin at the moment they interact with your brand – whether searching for your product online, engaging with a sponsored social media advertisement or visiting your physical store, you must acknowledge that the experience begins long before the traditional boundaries of the CXP. Customer journey studies are served well by multifaceted qualitative research methods.    At Insightrix, we build our CX framework as though each customer situation is different. It is our responsibility to report on insights - from many sources - including using innovative qualitative techniques such as online communities, online focus groups, employee insights and more. As a market research firm, we put together role-specific questionnaires and moderator guides to help bring clarity to the data findings and should ultimately help narrow the moments of truth in your customer’s journey.   2. Leverage Research Tools Research tools are an important part of any CX journey mapping toolkit. In order to get the most out of your framework, utilize tools that drive your methodology. By using interactive, rich media methods – your consumer is given an advantage when attempting to explain their experience. Qualitative techniques can benefit from a Market Research Online Community (MROC) platform. Online Communities allow CX professionals to easily consult with their customers and obtain the qualitative data they need to create a customer-centric customer journey map.   3. Use Solid Interview Questions Customer-centric journey mapping has gone beyond the use of closed-ended questions. Rather, it has evolved to incorporate targeted, open-ended questions intended to grasp the full pulse of the customer. Questions like these draw your customer out, and allow you to obtain qualitative data you can use to discover their key drivers and motivations. Solid interview questions provide verbatim to uncover and understand pain points in your CX and allow you to “close the loop” with dissatisfied customers.   4. A customer journey map connects organizations with customers CX measurement programs have evolved beyond obtaining data to create scores or measurement metrics. They have become customer-centric – focusing on the needs of the customer. They have progressed to where CX programs provide detailed maps of the entire customer journey. These customer journey maps speak to the qualitative experience of your customers, and allow organizations to Dive Deep into their customer’s journey.   We recently developed a free whitepaper that deep dives into ways to set up a successful and insightful Customer Experience Measurement Program for your organization:   ...