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April 19, 2022 - A recent survey was done with 802 Saskatchewan residents that touched on top-of-mind key issues and hopes for 2022. The survey was conducted by Insightrix Research in April 2022 using SaskWatch Research, its online research panel. The following are six key takeaways from the survey:   Additionally, we asked residents to look back to March 2020 and share perspectives on how things have changed since the beginning of the pandemic.    As a province, we: Are more selfish and concerned about our individual needs (56%) Are more aware of others' needs and/or those less fortunate around us (40%) Haven't learned anything from the pandemic (39%) Have come together for the greater good (30%) State of Saskatchewan: April Streeter  To get a qualitative sense of how Saskatchewan residents are feeling, Insightrix hit the streets of Saskatoon about critical issues and their hope for the province for 2022. Want to learn more?  For more information on our recent April OnTopic release, email info@insightrix.com. Want to learn more about our omnibus service? Visit: https://insightrix.com/omnibus-surveys/  We regularly post new data and analyses on Saskatchewan's perceptions. Visit our website for more information.  ...
 

March 25, 2022 - Insightrix recently conducted a poll of 800 Saskatchewan residents to gain insight into the impact of increased food prices on individuals. Notably, we discovered that on average, residents cite a 20% to 30% increase in their household grocery bill.  Given the overall sentiment, Saskatchewan residents say they are generally more concerned about their household grocery expenses because of inflation. The top concerns cited by residents due to inflating food prices include affordability / being able to stay within their existing budget (52%), making sure they can eat healthy/quality food (24%), and that the general price of food will continue to increase (17%). Overall, Saskatchewan residents indicate a recent change to purchase behaviours due to the rise in food prices, with 62% of residents saying they are now buying 'different or less or lowered priced brands' than they were previously. Significant changes in behaviours are especially noted for those who say they have decreased how often they eat out at a restaurant (59%) or order take-out (49%).   Impact of Inflation on Food Prices in Saskatchewan Vox Pop To get a qualitative sense of how Saskatchewan residents are feeling, Insightrix hit the streets of Saskatoon to ask how inflation is affecting grocery bills in everyday households.  https://youtu.be/LGHfw_S--N4 Want to know more about this month's OnTopic release?  hbspt.forms.create({ region: "na1", portalId: "374811", formId: "2caa8378-11c6-4a81-a470-2263e18e14c1" }); ...
 

Here we are again—2022, but perhaps with a little less optimism and a lot more hope? Another fresh start in front of us, as marketers, as brands, as customers and citizens, we are given an opportunity— Yes, it's exciting, but what now? Many of us are ready to put that strategy together but are still dealing with uncertainty every day. In some cases, we look to the recent past for guidance, as things have changed dramatically, and they continue to change— rapidly! For example, how do we know who to target if we want to launch a new product in 2022? Since 2020 it's hard to fully depend on our existing market segmentation reports because it feels as if so much has changed. This includes the way people shop, live, eat, travel, and who they spend money with. As brands, we must refine our segments, or at the very least, seek confirmation of the old segments to help us understand how these behaviours hold up. Here are some common segmentation questions we hear: How will my market segmentation hold up? Will my current breakdown of my customers still be relevant? Without question, the pandemic has a significant impact on people's lifestyles and their mindsets and also their priorities. But, as we continue to cope with changing government mandates, lessening of restrictions, and returning to a "normal," it's anyone's guess what we'll have to adapt next as consumers. Meaning the way we used to act or think could have shifted, and what was previously necessary to us may have become less so. Getting a Pulse On Your Current Segmentation Getting a pulse on your current segmentation is critical to regaining trust in your strategy and focusing on the key indicators that define how it may have changed. It's better to know now if your segments are no longer relevant than to find out after spending thousands on a new product launch that it missed the mark, or worse, missed the opportunity to target the ideal customer. The key is not to disregard your existing segmentation as ineffective but rather to view it as a baseline. In other words, a peek into where we've been and where we might want to go. Perhaps existing segments may still be relevant. Still, your consumer outlook on how they want to be reached has shifted drastically, such as the rise in the use of TikTok during the pandemic. Our Syndicated Research Study, The Insightrix Media Usage Report: Answering Your Advertising Questions shows that in 2021, TikTok became one of the fastest-rising social media platforms in Saskatchewan. In this case, it might be helpful to re-run the same segmentation with the same methodology to see what's changed and validate that where we are focusing our strategy and spending is where we should be. Assurance in our data and decisions Since the size of each segment has shifted, our priority customer group may be less relevant when it comes to the dollars we want to spend on marketing, or perhaps this group is more prominent now. Suppose we already anticipate changes or the re-run of our existing segmentation highlights considerable new information. In that case, it may be time to reevaluate our methodology, develop a new set of statements, and ultimately redefine our customer base. Here are some key questions to ask when deciding if your market segmentation is relevant: Does my framework suddenly not "fit" with how society is being asked to live its lives? For example, is your primary segment based on how many hours one spent commuting to work or attending outdoor concerts/events? Is there a decrease or increase in a particular segment over time? For example, does your traditional tracking study indicate that more males aged 34-45 are interested in your brand, and were these demographics previously in a secondary or tertiary segment where you did not spend key market dollars? This may indicate that your primary segment has shifted. If you need help in looking at your tracking data to identify some of these key changes, we are happy to help! 😄 *Has there been a significant change to the marketplace you used to 'play' in? For example, were your goods/products primarily purchased face-to-face before Covid-19? Are your customers now seeking alternative ways to buy the same product, expanding the competitive landscape in which you used to play? *Note* This may not mean your segmentation is irrelevant, and certain things like purchasing behaviour can easily be verified using other methods by running a quick pulse study with a primary segment. If you answered yes to any of the first three questions, it might be time to dig a little deeper into your existing segmentation and evaluate its relevance. Reviewing segmentation typing tools to help answer the following two key questions: Do any of the current statements in the typing tool represent certain behaviours that your target audience cannot engage in right now but are likely to resume later?Are any of the current statements insensitive to the current environment? Perhaps the segmentation is still relevant, but at the very least, the target segments you have been working with are likely to have shifted. Consider conducting a profiling survey to help redefine the size of these segments. Right now, we're all in a world of flux. Things are changing, and if the last two years have taught us anything, we need to adapt quickly. To discuss segmentation and profiling more, please contact Insightrix Research at info@insightrix.com.    ...
 

Without members, your organization would look fundamentally different altogether. Yet, even when you understand how critical your current members are, sometimes it is easy to focus on the products and services your business provides above your member's interests. Your team may be focused on improving your products to generate more memberships. And the dedication to improvement is admirable if you consider that a satisfying member experience can lead to an ace member loyalty program. Nevertheless, if your member does not like the current experience you offer or thinks you don't care about them as an individual, they can quickly move on to your competitor. The same is true if they feel they share the same values as your association. To truly align your values with your core customer, it's essential to focus on membership growth while learning how every touchpoint affects the overall perception of your brand. Member Research is Intelligent Member research is intelligent and can be hugely actionable. Member research can gather information to align your brand values with your member expectations. When it all boils down, good member research encourages organizations to take the feedback given by their member - or potential member - and reinvest it back into the organization. Businesses that rely on memberships have historically used market research to understand their member motivations and behaviours. For example, perhaps you are a not-for-profit that relies on members for annual funding. Picture your value proposition evolving due to industry pressures coming from new consumer behaviours. Perhaps you are interested in segmenting your member base to ensure the benefits offered are communicated to the right person. In all aspects, there is a case for member research. Membership-building Efforts When Marketing General Inc. (MGI) surveyed associations for its Membership Marketing Benchmarking Report*, it was reported that regardless of the membership type, almost half of the associations described a decline in overall memberships in 2019 (47%). Sadly, but not unexpectedly, many member-centric businesses took a hit to their membership over the pandemic. Yet despite current events, one in four (45%) associations report that they successfully grew membership in 2020. Moreover, compared to associations reporting membership declines, associations that reported increases in membership over the past five years are more likely to have a specific process in place to support innovation (22% vs. 17%) or are working on developing a strategy for innovation and new ideas (28% vs. 25%). To try and build on member growth, developing a strategy for innovation and new ideas can come from many avenues of business, including market research. Personalize Your Member Recruitment Strategy While it goes without saying, a key driver in any membership growth is an effective membership recruitment strategy. There are many ways to intensify your member recruitment efforts. However, while most member-driven organizations have established processes for membership growth, these work plans habitually offer little to no benefit, that is, without understanding your member and their needs. Additionally, even the best marketing strategies require consistent creative modifications to respond to the unanticipated changes in the marketplace – and membership experience (MX) programs are no different. Communicating Membership Value Are you effectively getting the word out to members about their benefits? Or does your membership value proposition need some tuning up? Associations with a focus on membership growth are always trying to innovate membership benefits. These brands understand the importance of using member feedback to learn about the interests and the behaviours directly from the source. As a result, these organizations build MX programs that are often well-targeted by different segments. These programs, in turn, offer their membership the type of products and services specific to them and their needs as a member.   When an organization is genuinely member-centric at its core, its values and business values align with its member base. Potential members can sense marketing fluff from a mile away, and it is not enough to assume who your core member is or what they like. Society is changing, and so is your member profile. Communicating value to your member can no longer fit into bullet-point lists on on-site pamphlets – they must be expressed in a way that your members understand and the way your members can appreciate. Members Come First   Organizations that rely on members for their association to succeed must genuinely believe that the member comes first. Treat your members the way they want to be treated – like valued members. But more than that, they want to know that you value them as real human beings, not just another number. Invest in your members by getting feedback directly from them. Understand their needs instantly from them. It's critical member-centric organizations implement feedback into their communication to show that you've listened and you've heard what they've told you. Members want to belong to your organization, and it is essential to let them feel the emotional engagement, which builds loyalty. Being a member-first organization is not something you fulfill through marketing messaging. It is something you live, breathe, and do.  Market Research for Credit Unions For more information on the work that Insightrix does in this area, please get in touch with us. We would love to discuss the extensive work in this area – with associations, not-for-profits, post-secondary, and financial institutions and banks. While you're at it, check out our new whitepaper on how member-driven institutions like financial credit unions can use research to personalize their member experience program. Get your free whitepaper here.   ...
 

In late December, Insightrix conducted an independent poll with Saskatchewan residents to understand how 2020 has impacted our lives. We asked residents how their work-life balance has changed, how productive they feel working from home, how 2020 has affected their overall health and the lasting perceived effect of 2020 on us. Insightrix surveyed 801 Saskatchewan residents on our consumer panel, SaskWatch Research®. Quotas were set by age, gender and region to match the general population. Data were collected from November 16 to 20, 2020. The Good. The Bad. The Ugly.  Just over half (51%) of Saskatchewan residents say that 2020 was a bad year. No surprises there. Those who say that COVID-19 contributed to their year badly, nearly all (95%) say it has contributed "a little/a lot". While a majority of residents say 2020 was not the best year, some residents shared why they believe the year was either good or bad for them. Is working from home here to stay? When asked if Saskatchewan residents had to move to a remote working arrangement, more than half (58%) say yes, while 38% say they did not. Many Saskatchewan residents say they worked from home. And while many adjusted to their "new normal," others explain why the adjustment has been difficult. When asked about working from home, Saskatchewan residents are split on how productive they say they are. A similar portion of people (37%) says they are a lot less/little less productive than those (35%) who say they are a lot more/a bit more productive. How is the Overall Perception of our Health in Saskatchewan?  Since the beginning of 2020, Saskatchewan residents report that their health broadly (62%) remains the same. 24% say that their health is a lot/a little worse. Another 11% say that their health is a little bit better. While most residents report that their health stayed relatively the same, some commented on how COVID-19 changed their lifestyle, whether focusing on more exercise or spending more time outdoors. Has Our Outlook Changed on Society? When asked if attitudes have changed about society and how it functions since the beginning of 2020, a significant portion agreed that it has, with 37% agreeing that their attitudes have changed a lot. Similarly, 46% say their attitude has changed a little about society and the way it functions. Looking at the events of 2020 – Insightrix surveyed residents to see they believe the events of 2020 will have a positive or negative lasting impact on the world. 63% reported that they think there will be a lasting negative impact, while another 21% say that it could have a positive lasting impact. All Doom and Gloom? Further, 42% of residents believe that the events of 2020 will leave a lasting negative impact on society. How optimistic are Saskatchewan residents for 2021? As the year unfolds, 6 in 10 residents say they are optimistic about the year! Research Details A total of 801 randomly selected SaskWatch Research® panel members participated in the online research study between November 16-20, 2020. Quotas were set by age, gender and region to match the general population. Since the research is conducted online, it is considered a non-probability proportion sample; therefore, margins of error are not applicable. However, the margin of error can be estimated to be ±3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20 for questions answered by all respondents.   About SaskWatch Research® Insightrix began developing its SaskWatch Research online market research panel in 2007 using high-quality techniques, including telephone recruitment and referrals from existing panel members. Presently, more than 18,500 active panel members represent all regions of the province and distributions of the general population. Panel membership closely matches the 2016 Census, based on age, gender, household composition, household income and education. For more information, please visit https://info.saskwatch.ca.   About Insightrix Insightrix is a dynamic, Saskatchewan-based, full-service market research company. It serves businesses and government entities with insights-driven research solutions and interpretive analysis through leading-edge tools and senior-level expertise across various industries. Insightrix is based in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. For complete details, visit https://insightrix.com/market-research-industry-blog/. ...
 

In late January, Insightrix conducted an independent poll regarding Saskatchewan resident perceptions of Canada-U.S. relations, performance of Trump as president and opinions on other recent events. Here are the findings. We surveyed 801 Saskatchewan residents on our consumer panel, SaskWatch Research®. Quotas are set by age, gender and region to match the distribution of the adult population of the province. Data were collected between January 22-26, 2021. Seven in ten Saskatchewan residents disapprove of the way Donald Trump handled his job as president. Women and those living in Regina and Saskatoon are more likely to disapprove of his performance. q2: Do you approve or disapprove of the way Donald Trump handled his job as president? Base: All respondents, n=801 Similarly, only seven in ten Saskatchewan residents trust the results of the U.S. election. Women and those in Regina and Saskatoon are more likely to trust the outcome. q3: Do you trust that the results of the 2020 American federal election are accurate? Base: All respondents, n=801 A similar proportion feel Donald Trump bears a lot of responsibility for the violence and destruction committed in the U.S. Capitol on January 6, 2021. Fully 16% believe he does not bear any responsibility. Males and rural residents are more likely to hold this belief. q4: How much responsibility, if any, does Donald Trump bear for the violence and destruction committed by some of his supporters after they broke into the United States Capitol (January 6, 2021)? Base: All respondents, n=801 Despite President Biden’s executive order regarding Keystone XL, more than half of Saskatchewan residents believe Canada-U.S. relations will improve under a Biden-Harris administration. Those living in Regina and Saskatoon are more likely to believe it will get better. q1: Under Biden-Harris, do you expect Canada-U.S. relations to… Base: All respondents, n=801 Intent to be vaccinated On a different topic, seven in ten Saskatchewan residents say they will choose to be vaccinated when a vaccine becomes available to them.  q6: If a vaccine for the coronavirus is made available to you, will you choose to be vaccinated? Base: All respondents, n=801 *** Research Details A total of 801 randomly selected SaskWatch Research® panel members participated in the online research study between January 22 to 26, 2021. Quotas were set by age, gender and region to match the general population. Since the research is conducted online, it is considered to be a non-probability proportion sample; therefore, margins of error are not applicable. However, the margin of error can be estimated to be ±3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20 for questions answered by all respondents.  About SaskWatch Research® Insightrix began developing its SaskWatch Research online market research panel in 2007 using high-quality techniques, including telephone recruitment and referrals from existing panel members. Presently, there are more than 18,500 active panel members representing all regions of the province and distributions of the general population. Panel membership closely matches the 2016 Census, based on age, gender, household composition, household income and education. For more information, please visit http://info.saskwatch.ca/. About Insightrix Insightrix is a dynamic, Saskatchewan-based, full-service market research company. It serves businesses and government entities with insights-driven research solutions, and interpretive analysis through leading-edge tools and senior-level expertise across a broad range of industries. Insightrix is based in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. For complete details visit:  https://insightrix.com/market-research-industry-blog/. *** For more information, please contact: Insightrix Research Inc.Tel: 306.657.5640Email: info@insightrix.com Web: insightrix.com ...
 

What's the difference? The terms data visualization and data representation can be easy to confuse. They sound pretty similar, and at first glance, one may find it's tricky to keep the two straight. And since data is ubiquitous these days, we are seeing more examples of both almost everywhere from our watches and fitness bands to the apps on our phones and dashboards on our computers.  Both have been employed in insights research and reporting for some time and they both fulfill specific functions. They both sound pretty similar, too, and they do similar things – it’s no wonder how it can be hard keeping data visualization and data representation straight. So, we've created a new downloadable infographic to explain the differences between the two and how they are used. We've been using it around our offices to help our researchers and data professionals explain the styles of data representation or data visualizations we might utilize in our reports. We've also been employing it to work with research professionals who are new to the field to help them also become acquainted with the uses and development of both - and now it's available for you to download for your own use! Scroll to the bottom of this article to download the infographic right away, or read on to learn more about the differences between data visualization and data representation for market research. Data visualization crunches numbers Putting it simply, data visualization is the process of taking information and representing it graphically. Common in insights and market research reporting, data visualization makes it easier to communicate the story in the data. When one is looking at a complex, large and perhaps varied data set, data visualization can be a great choice to impart that data story in a way that can be quickly and easily understood. Data visualizations are developed programmatically; that means they are built through the use of software. Think Google Maps or complex GIS systems - they crunch large data sets through sometimes sophisticated algorithms to find trends and correlations in the data, producing interactive representations that allow one to communicate or understand data more easily. Common examples of data visualizations include heat maps, streamgraphs and word clouds. Download your own copy of our infographic, The Difference Between Data Visualization and Data Representation for Market Research, by filling out the form below to see more data visualization examples and how they are used. Data representations support data reporting Sometimes referred to as infographics, data representations can support almost any kind of data reporting. They allow one to drill down to and communicate the most important parts of a data story graphically. Data representations, unlike data visualizations, are human generated. Design software is employed to build them (like Adobe Creative Suite, Canva or Piktochart), but they require a professional to take an editorial role in deciding which data to include to tell the data story best. Infographics communicate information creatively and stylistically to engage and create memorable experiences. This makes data representation ideal for executive summaries or to highlight key data points that may not be as well communicated in a data table or chart. Some ways data representations are used are in timelines, hierarchical representations, flow charts and comparisons.           Want to know about data visualization? Listen to Ep. 14 of Stories of Market Research: The Insightrix Podcast - it's all about how to use them, best practices on how to build them and more. Always know which to use and when We’ve developed an infographic that will help you remember the differences and uses of both data visualizations and representations. This rich and engaging chart offers insights into how both visualizations are representations are used and why, as well as the most common forms of both. You can hold onto it to refer to later, or share it to help teach others about infographics and visualizations. Go ahead - put it on your wall and never be unsure which chart or graphic to use to tell your next data story! Fill out the form below to access your own copy of The Difference Between Data Representation and Data Visualization for Market Research infographic.   Want to access the entire infographic? Fill out the form below to receive an email to download your own PDF copy.   hbspt.forms.create({ portalId: "374811", formId: "ae9b4751-7c2e-41f9-bde5-07da17ec7a90" }); ...
 

Insightrix infographics are a memorable, engaging and flexible way to communicate research data These days, data is everywhere. We get it from our televisions, our computers, our phones, our smartwatches and fitness bands – data is ubiquitous. All that data has one thing in common – it must be communicated in a way that can be readily understood, and if necessary, acted upon in ways that achieve results. But data can be hard to consume without visual aids like dashboards or charts and graphs. In fact, most of us would like to know the gist of what the data is saying - because not everyone gets excited about correlation or predictions. We fitness wearable users crave a clean, easy-to-read dashboard. Would Fitbit have succeeded without one? Maybe so, but...
 

Insightrix Holiday Spending 2019 has arrived! What is the Saskatchewan holiday shopping scene looking like for 2019? Did you know that this year, 93% of Saskatchewan residents plan to buy holiday gifts? And what’s more, 78% of those holiday shoppers expect to make at least some of their purchases online. The holiday shopping experience in Saskatchewan is as unique as the people who live here. So, we’ve developed a web report to let you know just how Saskatchewan shoppers plan to make their holiday purchases this year, how much they expect to spend and where they will be shopping. Whether you need to know because you’re a decision maker in the retail industry, whether you want to know because you like to keep an eye on what's happening in the Saskatchewan retail marketplace – or even if you’re just someone who is curious, Insightrix Holiday Spending 2019 has all the Saskatchewan-specific Christmas shopping statistics you'll want. What’s in Insightrix Holiday Spending 2019? Insightrix Holiday Spending 2019 has all of the up-to-date facts about the holiday retail experience in Saskatchewan. What’s more, it is deep on context, containing Saskatchewan holiday shopping intelligence that has been trending from 2015. Find out how just how many Saskatchewan residents expect to buy gifts during the 2019 holiday shopping season and how certain demographics will be spending. Learn about which proportions of residents expect to do their holiday shopping online in 2019 and who expects to do their shopping locally in brick-and-mortar stores. More than just that, you can discover how much residents expect to spend this year, what means of payment they will be using and how that compares to their holiday spending in previous years. Get an understanding of how discounts affect expected holiday shopping behaviour… and much more! You can access Insightrix Holiday Spending 2019 right here on the Insightrix website. hbspt.cta.load(374811, 'dfa7ed65-a26d-49d3-8eab-a45427eb22c7', {}); ...
 

Adding video responses to your research project can build on your insights story One of the qualitative tools our clients have recently requested more of lately has been the adoption of online video research (video surveys) to tap into consumer behaviours. Video surveys are a powerful tool to evoke customer feedback in a way that is simply unmatched by more traditional approaches than say...