Stories of Market Research: The Insightrix Podcast is back with a brand-new episode of a brand-new season. Season 2 of Stories of Market Research opens with Episode 9 – Market Research, Digital Marketing & Small Business, in which we are joined by social impact entrepreneur, author and communications consultant, Katrina German. In our conversation, Katrina unpacks some of the tricks and strategies she has developed in her book, Action Tracking: Master Your Digital Marketing Strategy in Under 30 Days, to help small-business owners and marketers employed in small- or medium-sized businesses create digital marketing plans that will help them break through the digital clutter and stand out against the marketing of much larger businesses. We discuss the tools (like CRMs, social media applications and Google AdWords) that business owners and marketers can use to develop their own plans, as well as how they can use the data gathered from experiments with these tools to do their own market research to make their digital marketing plans and campaigns even better. We also discuss some of the more accessible resources available to SMB owners and marketers from market research agencies, like omnibus surveys or syndicated reports, and how they can use them. Later in the episode, Katrina German lays out some of the new trends that digital marketers can expect to see in the future, as well as some tricks of the trade that will help get digital marketing messages and content noticed. If you’d like more information about Katrina or would like to contact her, go to Katrinagerman.com. There, you’ll be able to find more out about the work she does, contact her or get more information about her book, Action Tracking: Master Your Digital Marketing Strategy in Under 30 Days. It’s a great resource for folks looking to either begin marketing their small business or to augment the digital marketing strategies they already employ. You can learn more about the Insightrix products and programs, like syndicated reporting and omnibus surveys, here on the Insightrix website. More from Insightrix Research You can follow Insightrix Research on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter, and subscribe to never miss a new video on YouTube. You can also access Stories of Market Research: The Insightrix Podcast on your favourite podcasting app, like Apple Podcasts, Stitcherand Google Play Music. ...

Multi-channel ad campaigns have their own challenges It doesn’t take a genius to know today’s customer is always connected and that audiences consistently have their finger on the social pulse through social media and the internet. And, let’s face it, getting honest feedback about your company, your product or your advertising can be especially difficult. This is the reality most advertisers are working in today, especially those working in multi-channel campaigns. With the desire to get messages out to as wide an audience as possible, many creative professionals can be quick to launch a multi-channel advertising campaign without putting effort into understanding how the overall message of the campaign is about to be received.  When advertisers (or marketers for that matter) are executing their digital campaigns this way, without employing ad testing methodologies and being unaware of how their messages are going to be received by their audiences, it is usually to be quicker than the other guy, or to avoid the dreaded, “Why did you spend money on that?” These micro-marketing moments can have a major impact on your brand, and if your audience does not respond well to your campaign, the backlash can happen as quickly as a comment on social media can be posted. Not employing creative testing can come at the cost of your brand’s reputation   While marketers and advertisers want to be quick and efficient, what they need is to be credible and relevant. This is even more relevant in multi-channel campaigns, in which messaging can change depending on in what location and on what medium it is being seen, and who the intended audience will be.  There are simple tools that can help deliver customer feedback on your advertising at the same pace your target audience is connecting with you. Feedback tools like advertising testing offer real value when it comes to seeing how your creative will be received, and are a great alternative to the more traditional (*ahem* not-as-quick) forms of evaluation.   What follows are 5 benefits of advertising testing in multi-channel campaigns   1. Find out what will work next time, and the time after, and the time after that… When you put an ad testing methodology to work on your creative, you are benchmarking – gathering data on what works best and what was less successful, what audiences engaged with most, how different channels engage with your advertisement, etc. By testing and adding to benchmarks and established norms about your creative, you will accumulate data on how to create great ads again and again based on what worked best before. 2. Your creative is good – It could be better… Want to turn out creative that will succeed in the audience you intend it to speak to? By testing your ad, you can make sure not only that your messaging is exactly how you intend it, but also that the message speaks exactly to whom you intend it to reach. New developments in methodologies have even made it possible to measure the virality of an ad before it is launched. Sure, the original messaging in the ad may have fallen short at first – but through ad testing, you can be sure to change it up before that creative ever hits the streets. 3. Money! Of course! A terrible ad costs the same to produce as a great one. At least, it can unless ad testing is put in place to catch that bad ad before it sees any large investment. Most of the spend on creatives will happen during the final phase of their production. Ad testing is usually done in the very beginning phases of the creative, using storyboards, animatics and other pre-production materials. Testing at this phase allows for your audience to get an idea of where a creative is going before it gets there, but saving the investment it would take to get that creative all the way finished and presented to them – a potentially sizeable savings.  4. We could all be a little more customer-centric… Providing what your customers want out of your organization is key in today’s marketplace. By employing ad testing with your customer base, you are listening to your customers and possibly co-creating with them. With data about your ads coming directly from your customer base, you can develop creative that speaks directly to them. 5. Protect your company’s reputation! Not employing creative testing can come at the cost of your brand’s reputation. While marketers and advertisers want to be quick and efficient, what they need is to be credible and relevant. Communicating with any audience involves some level of risk. Testing advertisements and their messages can help brands remove some of the risk by showing how messages will be received before they are visible to everyone, allowing for the gauging of opinion or reaction to your creative – potentially saving a brand from harm or embarrassment....

Ad testing isn’t a thing of the past It seems like every time forward-thinking marketers bring up ad testing these days, they are dismissed by their older, set-in-their-ways colleagues.  Concerns of cost and timeliness, as well as the idea that ad testing (in nebulously described ways) diminishes the creativity of your advertising efforts are usually at the root of criticism of the practice. While it may have been true at one point – before strides in technology and methodologies were made – practical application has lifted the practice of ad testing out of focus group rooms of the nineties and back into common practice for forward-thinking marketers. This is because ad testing has evolved. While today’s innovating front-line marketers are fixated on the metrics to help justify their advertisement choices, their executives and stakeholders simply want results. Marketers believe ad results should be inherently data driven, but businesses are starting to see the need for their brands to be more daring and better represented in the media, so the expectation is much bigger than a marketer’s projected ROI.   New quantitative techniques and methodologies have been developed to create faster, more credible and more actionable quantitative testing protocols and to build and access deeper, more robust norms - making those criticisms mentioned earlier more than a little invalid and out of date. But is advertisement research really worth the effort? The short answer is...

Have you ever asked yourself… How do successful companies build customer experience (CX) or user experience (UX) that keeps their customers coming back? What touch points are hooking these people?   Is it their advertising? It isn’t advertising – when was the last ad you remember for Facebook or Google? Is it their Website? In this case it can’t be their website – when is the last time you heard of a customer rave about a website as the reason they were happy with a brand? These successful companies don’t need to rely on their marketing – they rely on their users’ and customers’ behaviours to keep them coming back. They don’t rely on their brand to do the heavy lifting as consumers expect to be nurtured at every touchpoint.    How do you nurture these touch points? Think about it – when you miss your friends, you check Facebook. When you need to find something in a hurry, you Google it (you know you’re really creating a habit when your company name becomes a verb!). If you’re bored, you go to YouTube or Netflix for entertainment. These companies aren’t successful because they sell you on what they can do for you; they are successful because they have built customer engagement into their service offering – a engagement platform that is so successful that the customer experience becomes habitual to the users.   How do successful organizations habituate users?  One of the ways successful companies become habitual to users is through the development of a “hook” in their customer experience– a way to engage their customers that satisfies the customer’s needs. They provide a solution to their customers’ or clients’ needs with very little (or none at all) conscious thought required that, through use over time, prompts unsolicited customer engagement.     There are 5 questions you can ask to build a habitual Customer Experience: What do our clients/customers want? How is our product/service providing solutions to our customers’ problems? Why are clients/customers coming to us and not another company? What is the simplest way clients/customers can get the solution to their problem, and how can we make that process/action simpler for them? Are clients/customers finding their solution? Is there a way to leave them wanting more? What “work” do your clients/customers invest in your service/product? Does this work accumulate, leaving the product/service better each time with use?   Use Online Communities Imagine being able to get the answers to these questions without time consuming focus groups, but through fast, easily accessed and accurate quantitative and qualitative testing. Online communities are large panels of screened, invested individuals – individuals who can give you the answers with the targeted segmentation you need to improve your CX and develop a CXP that will keep bringing your clients and customers back. A great place to get started with your own online community is by taking a dive into our step-by-step guide in how to build a research community in under three days. These custom online communities’ solutions can provide answers to your burning questions just like those asked above. And if you’d like to learn more about how you can make your product or service more addictive, read Nir Eyal’s book, Hooked: How to Build Habit-Forming Products. It’s a great source for information on building habit-forming CX, and was great source material for this blog.   We recently developed a free whitepaper that deep dives into Customer-centric Experience programs driven by qualitative research techniques, click for more information:   ...

There are several Saskatchewan device usage trends marketers need to know about.  It used to be that only the richest and most influential had access to a mobile phone – we called them car phones. Eventually mobile phone became small enough to be portable – we carried them around in dedicated briefcases and thought we were cool doing it. By the 70s, we got our first look at a real handheld device - the first handheld cellular was over 20 cm long, weighed over 2 pounds and took over 10 hours to recharge after only 30 minutes of use. Ah, the dark days of early adoption. By the 90s, things began to change – personal cellphones, while still far from common, were starting to appear much more often. By the early 00s, being able to access the internet became a critical feature for cellphones. Soon we adapted more smart technology, and in just a few short years, the cellphone quickly became the smartphone. In 2015 (roughly fifteen years after Zach Morris made his mark on the world), smartphone ownership became the norm with 68% of Canadian households owning a cellphone. Now fast forward 2 years (according to the 2016 Saskatchewan Media Habits Syndicated Study), and 84% of Saskatchewan households have a smartphone! That’s a pretty fast adoption of device technology for a province that has admittedly been one of the low-tech adopters (in rural areas) in the wireless internet, 5G and the race to build accessible LTE data networks. In Saskatchewan, smartphone ownership fluctuates across demographics but it becomes pretty apparent that it declines with age ↘ For matures (68+) in Saskatchewan, smartphone adoption hasn’t really penetrated, as only 58% of residents reported owning a smartphone – far below the national average (even from 2 years ago). Unlike matures, baby boomers in Saskatchewan (49 – 67) tend to be better with adopting new tech as 79% of those we surveyed claim to own a smartphone. In contrast, youth have quickly adopted mobile technology. Respondents under the age of 48 are likely to be carrying around a smartphone (94% ownership) – which is much higher than the provincial average of 84% smartphone ownership. In teens (14 – 17), smartphone ownership accounts for 99% of the residents we surveyed.                            Let that sink in a bit. And that’s just talking about smartphones! In a changing landscape of devices, each with their own screen and internet hookup, it is important to have the right information to know how to plan your strategy. Do you find yourself asking… What is the average screen time people are putting on their devices? Which devices are getting the most play? What kind content are people engaging with on these devices?   Below are a few key consumer trends you need to know about device usage in Saskatchewan. 1. It turns out that Saskatchewan residents, who are under the age of 32, use their smartphones more than 20 hours per week! ????  That is nearly one full day a week devoted to screen time – and that does not include time being spent on other devices (laptops, desktops and tablets). For those who are over the age of 32, the amount of time spent on a smartphone for personal use decreases as they get older (see the chart above). *Interesting to note - time spent using devices other than smartphones (laptops, desktops, and tablets) doesn’t vary by age in the same way that smartphone usage does. 2. People are putting more screen time in than last year ↗ When it comes to the amount of time people are spending on their devices, usage is starting to peak. We asked respondents if they spent more time than last year on their devices and found that when it comes to smartphones and 43% of respondents stated they spent more time on them than last year.   The story is similar with tablets, as 19% say they spent more time on their tablet than they did the previous year.   Desktop and laptop screen time is also on the rise. Fifteen percent (15%) say they use them more than last they did the previous year. Even that old, standby television is still getting action. As a common household device, it still remains popular with residents. 3. Content choices vary across devices ▶ Now if you’re talking about what residents are watching on their screens, we found that choice of content varies depending on which device they are using. Residents reported they tend to use their smartphones very little to view movies or television shows, stating they spend only 4% of their time on the device viewing each. Identical viewing times (4% each – movies and television shows) were reported on tablets, as well. Desktop and laptop computers received greater amounts of screen time – respondents stated they spend 12% of their time on the devices watching movies, and 9% watching television shows. Television still dominates in content viewership by quite a large margin. Respondents reported that 80% of the time they spend on their televisions is spent watching movies, and 83% watching television shows.   Interesting to note: Televisions are also changing how content can be viewed – televisions have become “smart” and now allows viewers to access the internet, stream movie applications (such as Netflix or Hulu) or even check their social media. In fact, what we call “televisions” have changed and evolved so greatly over the past several years that they are almost unrecognizable when compared to televisions of the 1980s and 90s. These changes, including PVRs and the earlier mentioned “smart” connectivity have allowed television to remain a dominant medium while still coming in second in use to smartphones.   Looking Forward: 3 Key Takeaways  ✅ Smartphones are the most used device and the one on which most of people’s time is spent, especially by younger age groups. Smartphones have changed user behaviour as consumers now connect to internet from everywhere. ✅ There is a rapid adoption of new technologies and devices, especially among younger generations. This is changing media consumption habits and preferences among Saskatchewan consumers. The change in viewing habits on multiple devices gives marketers an opportunity to reach out to these consumers across different platforms. ✅ Media plans must expand across multiple channels as markets develop.   For more information, download your Saskatchewan Device Usage Report. ...

Digital marketing through social media is quickly changing the landscape of advertising in Saskatchewan. It is especially changing how marketers handle their overall marketing mix in influencing consumers to engage with their brand online. We marketers can no longer expect a marketing campaign to succeed without understanding our target audience, their demographics and their buyer journey. In order to figure out our audience segments, we have to cognize their motives - an apt way to do so is by employing basic market research behind your strategies. Insightrix Research is dedicated to equipping professionals with real insights from their customers in order to strengthen their brand.  To help with this, take a look at some insights from a recent study revealing how generations in Saskatchewan – from teens to seniors – use social media and what they expect from the brands they follow.     Nearly everyone in Saskatchewan is on Facebook In Saskatchewan, across all generations, Facebook dominates the media landscape by far, with 9 out of 10 using it daily ????????   But does that really come as a surprise to you? While it is probably safe to determine social media is here to stay, interestingly enough, nearly half of Saskatchewan residents (48%) believe they spend too much time on social media - yet more and more people are frequently accessing it!     Regardless, since 2015, social media has seen a slight lift (4%) in users across all platforms ????   Though Facebook dominates the social media landscape in our province, it is not a favourite among teens.  For example… Of the teens on social media, only 63% claim to use Facebook as often as other favourite social platforms, while 1 in 4 (73%) endorse Snapchat as their No. 1 platform, followed by YouTube (64%) and then Instagram (57%). Of gen-Xers (32 to 48) on social, 92% indicated that Facebook is their go-to platform, yet few gen-Xers (17%) admit they use Snapchat.   Interestingly enough, we also discovered that a number of gen-Xers (11%) claimed to have stopped using Snapchat in the past year.   What encourages Saskatchewan residents to use social media? Understanding a particular generation on social is a must for today’s businesses, as more and more corporations recognize the value of these digital tools. Because social media is no longer utilized for the sole purpose of marketing or making friends - it has evolved to help educate and actively encourage consumers to engage with businesses or brands online. So, by determining a generation’s motives for using social media, you can begin to assess what causes social media users to engage with your content. For example… While 80% of the SK population on social platforms claim to use these platforms to keep in touch with friends and family, it’s interesting to note that millennials (aged 18 to 25) flock to social media to find information (43%) regarding entertainment or events online. And… Gen-Xers (47%) use Facebook groups try to get rid of unwanted household items. Those baby boomers are somewhere in between, looking for a healthy mix of shared family photos (53%) or to get information on current events (50%). And matures 68+ (47%) are always on the lookout for those new recipes…   What do followers want from brands? We discovered that about one third (35%) of social media users in Saskatchewan follow particular businesses or brands ????????   And, while there are many reasons cited in the research as to why residents follow brands on social media, 1-in-5 millennials admit they follow a particular brand or business for the simple fact that they “like” it! Because we know almost 8-in-10 residents who follow brands do-so on Facebook, the real question is… what do consumers want from the businesses or brands they follow? The answer is in the discount!   Nearly 1-in-4 Saskatchewan residents claim discounts would likely get them to follow a business on social media ????‼   While 83% of millennials who follow brands on social media (aged 26 to 31) admit discounts encourage them to follow particular brands, only 42% of matures (68+) say it would likely make them hit the “like page” button. Interestingly enough, half of all residents who follow brands on social media (50%) flock to brand-specific channels for product/brand information and tips and advice.   The influencers in Saskatchewan consumer buyer decisions are…?     We discovered personal recommendations – including those within one’s social circles – play a major role in influencing buyer decisions of social media users in Saskatchewan. 78% of residents on social media claim recommendations from a friend, a family member or a known acquaintance have influence on their buying decisions ???? ????   Further, 1-in-3 social media users in Saskatchewan claim family and friend recommendations have a “high influence” on their purchasing decisions. Younger generations are twice as likely as older generations to be influenced by someone within their social circle during their buyer journey. It is also worth noting that 60% of millennials (aged 26 to 31) claim an online review or a recommendation from someone within their social media circle as influential, while only 38% of baby boomers use social media recommendations to influence purchasing decisions. All generations may be represented on social and some are probably following your brand, but your segments will have different expectations from you. As we have come to see it - teens in Saskatchewan use social for, well, social reasons; millennials use social to do their research and ask questions; Gen Xers use it to coordinate life events and make their day a little easier overall; baby boomers are observers and tend to use social as generalists and matures… matures love recipes. ✔ Want to know more about this Syndicated Report?   Click here!  ...

Ever stroll through a retail mall and realize businesses are direct targeting someone far off from your demographic? As if you were too old, too young or too hip for the crowd they are targeting? Landing pages are often designed the same way. Landing pages are meant to appeal to everyone but really cater to a select few. A landing page is like an outlet store – it is waiting to sell you discounted items at a reduced rate, in exchange for loyalty and perhaps a conversation. And much like a mall, consumers have money in their pockets and perhaps no real reason to be there, but the goal is to make them stay and - hopefully - spend. Like a retail mall, your landing page is one of many and if it isn’t targeting the right folks, chances are your customer is walking right on past your flashy marketing endeavours. Counter that bounce rate and take your leads back! There are real reasons conversions do not happen.   Your Opt-in form is too opt-in-y and not enough opt-me-faster please Your opt-in form should be crisp and the most noticed piece of content on the landing page. Making your consumers dig to download will make them bounce, and bounce fast. Make use of bold headlines and sub headlines to get the single objective across. If your lead cannot spot scan your offer, they will not continue reading. Like a mall, customers detest digging for sales and they’ll bombard all of your content in search of one.   Don't you dare double up your Call To Action (CTA) Your landing page should be clear and contain one offer. Asking your customers for more than one piece of information before the conversation has started is a sure way to scare off new business. As an online business, we tell our customers to be cautious online everyday – so why should they treat our offer any differently? Ease in and make the landing Ease in and make the landing page clear. A clear page is a trustworthy page. Like a mall, it is easier to convince your consumer to come in and spend money on a sale of 25% off all merchandise than to convince them to enter your store at 10%, with another 15% by using the coupon they found online and downloaded. Making your customer work to find the best deal possible is a conversion killer.   Click Bait creates brand distrust - find a more clever way to land your leads Everyone loves free stuff...

In an era where every Internet user has a journey to share and is the storyteller of their own immediate world – the question is – how often does your brand take into consideration that it needs to do the same?  In business, we often interpret the act of purchasing products as a purely transactional experience – one that is solely between a business and its consumer. It is rare that a brand superimposes its ability to sell you a human experience past why their product is made for you. Too often, their marketing ensures how the offering will ultimately give you a better lifestyle experience, yet few rarely provide a narrative experience for the human in you. But times they are a changin’, as Dylan sang. Take this for example - no lies - I nearly shed a tear while watching a Duracell commercial. https://youtu.be/tSlUH2WmkYA That’s it folks – a battery commercial tugged on my heartstrings and it had me thinking: How…. but why…. BUT HOW? Well – to put it simply – the brand told me a story I could relate to and the "offering" was humanized as a story...

Trying to figure out millennials and how to market to them effectively has been quite the topic of discussion of late. Actually, every time we are on the cusp of a new generation set to become the primary purchasers in Canada, we flock to their archetype and often attempt to exploit it. But it seems nobody can get a handle on who these millennials are and what they are all about. What a typical millennial problem… According to StatCan, this demographic makes up a significant portion of the population of Saskatchewan – not only that – but we actually have more young people, per capita. So… shouldn’t there be a way to understand their media habits and ensure advertising can effectively target them? This head-scratcher is often brought up at Insightrix in attempt to better segment younger users and learn their media behaviours (This is similar to what we've recently accomplished for a favourite CFL brand, the Saskatchewan Roughriders). To better understand millennials and their media behaviours, Insightrix recently examined its Saskatchewan Digital Democracy syndicated series, which answers questions like:  What social media platform is most popular among teens, millennials, gen-X'ers or baby boomers in Saskatchewan? How many residents are engaging with more than one social platform, and if so, which ones? The syndicated study measures media usage among generations, including determining the ways people in Saskatchewan connect and their preference of social media platforms like Facebook, Snapchat, Twitter or Instagram. This syndicated study continues our ongoing Saskatchewan Data Insider Series which tracks how Saskatchewan engages online.  If you’re interested in a teaser report outlining how, access it free here.   When it comes to individuals aged 26 to 31 in the province - 97% use social media of some kind. Here's a breakdown of social media usage by millennials: Though you might not guess it - believe it or not - most millennials believe they spend too much time on social media, while 42% say the time they spend on these sites is, “about right”. Only 1% said they believed they should spend more time on social media: Not only that, but more than half of SK millennials (54%) claim checking their phone is the last thing they do before bed.  Because millennials think they spend too much time on social media, it can said that over promoting to this group has its drawbacks because of the over exposure it may cause. Millennials are the group that is more likely "hide" your social media promotions if they crowd their news feeds.  Do you think millennials are easy or hard to market to?    Syndicated Series In our syndicated report, you’ll find further information about social media usage of millennials in Saskatchewan, as well as media habits across other age demographics. This data can inform your advertising efforts, giving you a valuable addition to your marketing toolkit. For a social media snapshot, access your free eBook and get highlights from the syndicated report. Or, even better, purchase the entire report and gain an understanding of the media habits of Saskatchewan residents across all age demographics.  ...

Market research is imperative in advertising messaging. In a recent article on marketingweek.com the author Thomas Hobbs looks at Pepsi’s recent blunder with a Kendall Jenner advertisement and discusses market research in ad messaging. The author writes, that it all began last year at the Cannes film festival when PepsiCo’s president Brad Jakeman criticized the outdated state of ad agencies. His criticism was based on the idea that a company like Pepsi needs to be producing content at a rapid speed and the traditional model of using ad agencies takes too long. His bold plan was to create a content creation studio within Pepsi, which he called Creators League Studio. Jakeman stated, “instead of five pieces of content a year, a brand like Pepsi needs about 5,000 pieces of content a year. Instead of taking six months to develop an ad, we have six hours or six days. And instead of it costing $2M, it needs to cost $20,000.” While Jakeman’s plan was a bold one, he failed to realize one of the key important attributes that go with the outside ad agency which is an outsider’s perspective. While it is true that content takes a long time to create with an ad agency, part of the reason is the amount of testing that goes into a campaign.   Want to read the full blog? Click Here Interested in this topic? Check out others like it: Old Spice's Rebranding Success Story  http://insightrixcommunities.com/old-spices-rebranding-success-story/  Adobe Poises for the Future  http://insightrixcommunities.com/adobe-poises-future/ The Rise of Marketing Technology http://insightrixcommunities.com/the-rise-of-marketing-technology/...