Who knew passive data collection could make research so convenient? Passive data collection, sometimes called passive data metering, is a valuable addition to the research toolkit, especially in cases where your research requires segment-specific, timely and accurate data about your customers' online behaviours and habits. Over the past half century or so, market research data collection has been done through traditional methods. Where once traditional data collection was accomplished mostly through face-to-face techniques like focus groups or in-depth interviewing, data collection soon leveraged technology, and by the 90s, data collection was being done remotely by telephone. Then, in the 2000s, market research began to move much of its data collection to the internet, using online panels to conduct surveys, hold discussions or perform interviews with participants. This progression led to more an easier and more thorough collection process that led to greater amounts of better developed data for insights professionals to analyze – resulting in deeper and more actionable insights for their clients. But these newer techniques that were facilitated by technology had one thing in common – they were still reliant on traditional, active market research methodologies to collect the necessary data – like focus groups, in-depth interviews, discussions, etc. Now, over the past several years, a new data collection method has become available to insights professionals - passive data collection. With that in mind, let's find out what passive data collection is all about and how it could benefit your next research project. The Art of Passive Data In a nutshell, passive data collection is a method by which data is collected without the active participation or direct involvement of the participants who are being studied – all with the full knowledge and consent of those who participate. Passive Data metering can record the user’s activity, such as website search history, app usage, streaming media usage, social media activity and much more, all with the permission of the user. This activity is collected by the app and then analyzed by insights professionals. It’s actually pretty simple, really – but the complexity and richness of data that results is anything but. Skip the Surveys What is important about passive data collection is that it is just that - passive. It does not ask for any active participation from research participants. All they have to do is what they would do normally, and the data flows in. Compare this with active data collection methodologies like surveys or interviews where participants must consciously take part in every part of the data collection process. Sometimes self-reported data isn’t as reliable – I mean, we are humans and human error is often an issue for studies that require things like recall. For example, asking someone how many times they’ve seen an advertisement on YouTube may be hard to remember – but passive data eliminates that notion completely. Whether they are self-reporting seeing an advertisement several times, the passive data approach will identify if they have seen the advertisement, when they saw it, and if they did anything to engage with it further – now that is real insight! Passive data collection removes the burden of reporting from the participant and allows them to participate in the research process with little to no effort on their part. Get an Authentic Picture of Your Actual Customers Active data collection techniques definitely have their place and are still a valuable research tool, but they all have one thing in common: they rely on what a participant tells you rather than on their actual, real-life behaviours. Using passive data metering, you get a front row seat to all your customers’ behaviours as they relate to your brand – and your competitors. Achieve better representation - When you monitor users’ online behaviours, you can tell exactly who your customers and potential customers really are through observing their actions, not just what they say. Combine this with thoughtful and active targeted research recruiting, and you can learn even more about your target customer and their preferences. Remove the guesswork - Knowing exactly where your target customer is going online and what they are doing saves brands time, energy and money. More than that, through metering participants’ online behaviour, companies can gain valuable insights relating to other areas of interest they may have that can be integrated into marketing initiatives, advertising campaigns or product offerings. Complement traditional research - Earlier we mentioned that traditional research still very much has a place in market research and that could not be more true! When you engage with participants in active data collection, you are engaging them on a conscious level – getting their thought out and well-considered opinions. These opinions are incredibly valuable, as they represent what participants want you to know – you don’t have to be a genius to know how valuable that kind of information can be. When combined with passive metering, the increased depth and quality of the data collected is undeniable – and the recommendations based upon it are even more relevant and actionable. Passive Data Collection at Insightrix Insightrix Passive Data Metering is a valuable stand-alone research methodology, or it can act as a complement to more traditional, active data collection techniques. Data on the internet is not just widely available – it can provide companies with real, actionable results. Don’t miss out on the opportunity it presents. If you would like to know more about Insightrix Passive Metering, please fill out the form below to download our brochure. And if you already know passive data collection is perfect for your next research project, contact us. hbspt.forms.create({ portalId: "374811", formId: "90224d74-059f-4167-9bc7-e0c73048b527" }); ...
 

Customer experience programs are not a new concept It has been pretty much established that in any line of business, while your product or service may be what gets them in the door, what keeps your customers coming back again and again is the experience.  The customer experience landscape has shifted the way all B2C organizations manage their brand. This can include impeccable front-line customer service, ease of navigating your facilities (or digital assets), the user design of those facilities, etc. - and how that all ultimately ties back into your customer journey.  In fact, customer experience is not only the responsibility of one business area; it's something that should be managed across all levels of business.  In the beginning… Weirdly enough, customer experience measurement (or management programs) have existed in many forms over the years. From the first bazaar merchant who asked a customer if they could do better, to customer comment cards and the old school variant - the customer satisfaction survey - most of these older methodologies revolved almost exclusively around identifying customer touchpoints, or moments of contact between the business and the customer before and after their purchase. But, focusing almost entirely on increasing satisfaction at these points is a slippery slope, as it can lead to a distortion effect – data like this can lead companies to believe their customers are happier with the company than they really are.    It also takes emphasis away from the customer’s actual journey with the company, and magnifies the need to act on specific touchpoints.   For example, if your customer service representative asked one of your customers during a service call how satisfied she or he was with their interaction on a Likert Scale, the number your company would get back may not accurately represent the reality of the interaction. Say the customer gave a rating of 3 out of a possible 7 – was this dissatisfaction due to the interaction the customer had with the customer service representative? Or was the frustration due to waiting too long to talk to that representative, or was the hold music not to her or his liking, or was there something else entirely that led to the customer’s dissatisfaction? In these older customer satisfaction methodologies, who knows? There just isn’t enough qualitative data to find out what led the customer to be dissatisfied – the company just knows something is wrong. Today’s customer experience measurement programs go beyond simple quantitative assessment and look to develop answers to WHY the customer is satisfied or dissatisfied. This gives a much more holistic view of what’s actually going on in these customer interactions.   Rather than trying to make sense of numbers with no meaning, today’s CX methodologies allow organizations to worry more about managing the store than managing their score.   In other words, customer experience programs allows businesses to become more customer-centric as a whole. In fact, on a recent episode of Stories of Market Research: The Insightrix Podcast we interviewed Voice of Customer consultant, John Morton, to dig into the most common and critical issues many organizations have encountered in managing their customer journey, as well as some of the customer experience best practices successful companies share.  Identify stakeholders, not just shareholders… Building a customer-centric organization is about building relationships – and building relationships is done by showing customers you are listening.  Creating a customer-centric organization involves talking to stakeholders – those people, like your customers, who rely on the company, and not just its c-suite executives and board members.   This is why employee engagement surveys are one of the crucial elements in any CX program.   To get to the bottom of a customer’s journey, you must involve front-line staff who are a major part of that journey. It’s the front-line staff of the company who are in the closest relationship with the customer. Therefore, their input to the process isn’t just important, it is critical. Without direct lines of communication between the front-line and the boardroom, divisions and disconnects across business silos occur – often resulting in a less than optimal customer experience. According to the Harvard Business Review, “Even if a fix appears obvious from the outside, the root causes of poor customer experience always stem from the inside, often from cross-functional disconnects. Only by getting cross-functional teams together to see problems for themselves and design solutions as a group can companies hope to make fixes that stick.” Customer experience programs tie the front-line and the boardroom together, creating an organization that not only understands the touch points in their customer’s journey, but also understands what’s happening in the organization on the ground level and all other points along that customer’s journey, before, during and after purchase.   Go beyond customer service and extend to all levels and all areas of a business and focus on creating customer relationships, not just sales.   Address not just the shareholders of a company, but also that company’s stakeholders – bridge the gap between the boardroom and the point of sale. Ultimately, CX programs address your customer’s entire journey with the company, resulting in someone who is willing to come back, again and again… and again. Do you want to know more about customer experience programs? You can download this whitepaper – it describes the Insightrix Customer-Centric Experience Program (Insightrix CX). ...
 

Ten years ago, the world was introduced to YouTube. Ever since, the media has been ripe with stories of viral videos. The videos are often seen as an overnight success, where uploaders will post something that they found funny, interesting, or absurd to show their friends.   At Insightrix Research, we set out to make a fun video that showed a little about who we are. Before we knew it, our “SaskatcheWHAT?!" slang-based video had a quarter of a million views and was featured in news outlets across the country including Huffington Post, CBC News and Global TV. The following white paper will highlight what makes a viral video, as well as the data, and feedback that we received from our video, which was entitled, SaskatcheWHAT?!    ...
 

By Corrin Harper, CEO and President, Insightrix Research Inc. Recently I had the opportunity to attend the W100 Idea Exchange designed specifically for women entrepreneurs, by the editors of PROFIT and Chatelaine. The Idea Exchange, held at the Ritz Carleton in Toronto on November 26th, provided a unique opportunity to share best practices with other leading women entrepreneurs, to learn from management experts about today's key business opportunities and challenges, and to create personal connections with other top entrepreneurs. Both being educational and inspirational, what a wonderful experience it was! One item from the exchange really resonated with me – every entrepreneur has to find their own path and use lessons they learn along the way to their advantage. Entrepreneurs – no matter what their educational background – achieve success by focusing on their passion and backing it up with an unparalleled work ethic. Here are a few tips that were discussed at the Exchange that can help a person become the most successful entrepreneur possible. Work Hard, No Matter What If you aren’t giving it 100 percent, you won’t be successful, and this resonates beyond business. Success is directly related to the amount of effort you’re willing put in. Always. Giving 100 percent does not mean having to put in 100 hours a week, but it does mean taking care of your investment, taking the breaks when needed to clear your mind to see things from a fresh perspective, and above all, it means being dedicated and driven to meeting the projective goals. People are Your Greatest Assets All businesses need a range of skills to be sustainable and be able to grow. As the owner of a business, you are called upon to perform several roles out of necessity. However, there are some roles you are better at than others. If you want your business to progress, it will reach a stage when necessary skills, need to be improved and extended. Getting the right mix of people to complement and reinforce your skills is essential. When hiring for a small [firm/business], you need employees who demonstrate entrepreneurial characteristics and work habits. Employees come in all shapes and sizes,with all sorts of diverse skills and quirks. Look for those who can handle risk, are results oriented, a team player, high energy, and growth-oriented. No one is perfect, so create a environment where these dynamics are supported and work with employees to maximize their potential in those areas. Learn from Your Hits and Misses Every entrepreneur will have missteps and false starts along the way, but they will end up helping in the long run. You have to be prepared to take those high reward risks and accept the fact that you will make mistakes along the way. The key is not to fall into the trap of believing you always have to get everything right. Risk Taking Risk-taking is almost synonymous with entrepreneurship. When just starting your business, you’ll have to put your career, personal finances, and sometimes even your mental health at stake. Almost all entrerpreuneurs at the Idea Exchange shared stories about abandonig their steady paycheck, sacrificing personal capital, and donating personal time and health. Let’s face it -- this sounds awful. However entrepreneurs frequently talk about this as being the best time of their life! Because we are dedicated to our business, enjoy what we are doing, and worked hard to overcome those stressors, we often reflect on these times with a positive feeling, knowing how far we’ve really come. The Exchange was a wonderful experience, sharing stories with other entrepreneurs, and one that I will remember always....
 

#1. What does a research company need to know from me? If your business has questions that need answering you may have made the same decision that a lot of businesses do: turning to market research to get those answers. However, for companies that have never done market research before, it may be difficult to know what they need to do in order to get the best possible results. Start with an internal discussion of what problems your business may be facing. You don’t need to know exactly how you will address those questions through research – that’s where the provider will come in. Also think about what goals you are hoping to achieve with your research results and who in your organization will need to use these results. Talk with stakeholders within your organization to see what’s on their wish list to know. These points will allow the researchers to choose a research methodology that will fit your needs. Furthermore, letting your research provider know what kind of budget you are working with will help them operate within your means. #2. Who is my target population? Determining your target population or respondent group (those who will be providing you with answers – such as current or potential customers, employees, or other stakeholder groups) is crucial to gathering actionable results that answer the research objectives. The target respondent is often determined by thinking critically about what hurdle your business is trying to overcome. For example, if you wanted to determine customer satisfaction for a line of winter tires, you might want to survey only those with a vehicle. Your target audience may be quite general (all Canadians, for example) or quite specific. If you’re unsure of who your target audience is, our team of research executives can help you pin-point exactly who you should be talking to. For example, our SaskWatch Research™ Panel has over 100 profile questions to ensure your survey is taken by exactly who you want to reach. #3. What are quotas and do I need them? Quotas are partitions of the population that are created to make sure that your research is representative of the population you’re trying to survey. For example, if you want to get an idea about what Canadians think about a certain topic, you would want to have about half of the people answering to be male and half female in order to match demographics. The most common quotas are based on age, gender, and region. Setting quotas helps you to make sure that the research results that you get are applicable to the population at large. This extra step allows you to make accurate forecasts about things like market share or uptake of a new product. #4. What approach should I take? What kind of research methods you utilize depends on what kind of answers you’re looking for. If the questions you want to ask start with ‘how many, how often, what, and where,’ then chances are you will want to use a method of quantitative research. This type of research is intended to be statistically reflective of the market, and will give you quantitative statistics that you can extrapolate to a larger population. If your question is about ‘why’ or ‘how,’ you might want to utilize a qualitative research method. Qualitative research employs methods, such as focus groups and in-depth interviews, allow you to dig deeper, but with fewer respondents. These exploratory research methods more fully uncover respondents’ perceptions, experiences and feelings, and add additional context to quantitative results. The division between qualitative and quantitative research is frequently blurred. Often, a comprehensive research project will involve more than one type of research to answer various objectives. #5. How much data should be collected? This question depends heavily on what kind of budget you are working with, however, spending more is not necessarily better. Depending on what your objective is, impactful research can be done on a relatively minimal budget. Think about how much detail you need in order to make whatever business decisions you’re trying to make. Are you looking to understand if your customers are satisfied with a certain product? Measuring a potential customer’s perception and barriers? Determining the awareness of your brand on a local scale? Whatever the need, it is crucial that enough respondents are obtained to ensure your results are statistically valid. However, paying more to get extremely accurate results when the organization is not able to take action on them means wasted budget. An experienced research provider can guide you to making these decisions and recommend an effective methodology. #6. How long will it take? How long your research takes depends on what type of research you are wanting to conduct, how many people you want to reach, and what method you would like to use (telephone takes longer than online, for example). It also depends on how clear you are with your research objectives. Your research provider will provide you timeline at the beginning of your project so that you are able to plan accordingly. However, there are options if you are in a crunch for time. For example, Insightrix offers a monthly OnTopic™ omnibus survey. OnTopic™ surveys are great if you only have a few questions to ask and have a tight deadline on the data needed. Your questions will be combined with other omnibus clients and is given as one single survey to our panelists. OnTopic™ has a one week turnaround, giving you faster access to the answers you’ve been looking for. #7. How will I be kept aware of the progress of my research? Your project will be assigned a project manager that will keep you informed on the status of your research. This is your primary point of contact and this individual will be the one to inform you if any complications should arise. Especially if your research project has a long field window, you may want to monitor the results as interviews are taking place. Topline reporting allows clients to monitor the results of each survey the moment the responses are collected. The results ideally include user-friendly features that display counts, percentages, and graphs for each question, offering the ability to share these topline results within your organization. #8. What kind of results will I receive? Research results don’t mean much if they are indecipherable. Depending on the needs of your business, there are many different types of deliverables that can be provided at the end of your research project, such as written reports in Word, PowerPoint reports, detailed tables, in-person presentations, infographics, to name a few. With individuals at all levels in an organization becoming shorter and shorter on time, a concise reporting style is essential. Sharp analysis, visually-engaging presentations, structured narrative, and succinct summaries as well as infographics that “pop” and engaging videos will engage stakeholders with the story your data is trying to tell....
 

We’ve all been there - your client needs the report by noon tomorrow, and though you may have the meat and potatoes, you scratch your head at the prospect of presenting all that data in a visual way. In anticipation that you will communicate your study’s results in a way that is attractive and straight to the point (but in a time restraint), time management can be problematic. Don’t fret, a few simple chart tips can save some of that precious time. Many researchers cling to the standard bar graphs, and when creating a report with a fast turnaround, disregard data visualisation in lieu of time management. When under pressure, these few, simple practices can help you create a quick and clean visual that your client can truly understand. #1. Plan ahead – When inserting a graph or chart in your report, it is important to decide what information you wish to display. If you’re skipping lunch to finish said document, then chances are you do not have extra time to fiddle with changes in the display of data for each chart. Each time you re-make a format decision, you could run into time management issues. Simply formulating a plan allows you to save time in the long run. Choosing a simple chart will allow for more time to control the quality before the report lands in your client’s hands – and often simpler is better anyway. #2. Consider your target audience– Even with a formulated plan, it’s important to think about the purpose of charting to begin with. A great chart must achieve its purpose – it must be meaningful to the beholder. As well, keep in mind as to who is all looking at the report. Different levels in the organization require different levels of detail. Often a chart geared toward an executive needs less detail than a manager responsible for that particular product line. #3. A graph isn’t always the answer– I know, contradiction much? Not everyone reads charts every day. At times, using a chart can cloud the result instead of giving it clarity. By simply contrasting white space within your report, tables or textboxes can be just as visually impactful as charts. Highlighting differences with colour, especially when dealing with qualitative or open-ended responses, can also help to effectively convey a message without using a chart. #4. Perform a clarity test – Sometimes when working too close to a document, one needs a fresh set of eyes to graze over the information. Before pushing the report out, have a co-worker or peer review the visual data information without any context. If they can read the data without needing extensive background information, then you have succeeded in representing the data in a way it can stand alone. Studies with a smorgasbord of charts can prove puzzling, and may be curtly disregarded by a client short on time. Your clients expect that the report findings will provide clear answers to their objectives, and most importantly, illustrate the story behind the data. And at the end of the day the researcher is the illustrator, whereas the data remains the ink to craft the story. Have a plan, know your audience, provide clarity and generalize data in a way it can be read across the board. Related post: 6 Creative Ways to Present Your Market Research Data...
 

Because of recent news events, the 2014 CIRPA conference in Hamilton, Ontario had a more introspective atmosphere compared to years past. All the same, the conference was full of great information and friendly people, all wanting to share their knowledge and insights on various facets of institutional research. Many of the themes at this year’s conference had been recognized in sessions in prior years ; however, these trends continued to evolve with advancements in technology and broader, worldwide changes in research. There were many new insights at the sessions. In my opinion, two interesting themes were changes in data collection and changes in data dissemination: the types of data and methods to collect primary data, and the ways in which the research results are being disseminated to key stakeholder groups. Survey methodologies are quickly evolving, in educational institutions and elsewhere in market research. As mobile phones become ubiquitous, the more imperative it is that researchers adapt their survey design and their expectations to the changing technology. In this regard, the use of mobile phones to take surveys has been steadily increasing – to such an extent that research must take the device into account – most specifically in the design of the survey. This means more than making sure the survey technically works on a smartphone. It might mean shortening surveys or adapting the question types to be easier to complete on a mobile device. There was a roar of discussion in boosting survey results with other data, including nationally or provincially collected statistics from government agencies and data containing online conversations through social media sites. Additionally, more sophisticated data tools and outcomes-driven predictive modelling, on things like retention and enrolment, are becoming more common as a part of an educational institution’s research toolkit. I find this development promising and it has the capacity to be a relevant theme for many years, as the amount and nature of the data that is available increases. Disseminating information within a large organization such as an educational institution can be difficult. For this reason, many research groups are actively creating tailored materials to disseminate information for a variety of audiences. At CIRPA, there were several sessions with tips on data visualization, dashboarding, and combining multiple datasets into more holistic research results. With the amount and variety of information ever increasing, it is often difficult to ensure that stakeholders aren’t drowning in data. I anticipate it will become common for institutional research groups to provide stakeholders with more frequent and shorter sets of research results, rather than a long, drawn out report that they may or may not have time to read at once. This follows a greater theme in research where clients are increasingly asking for a suite of deliverables rather than a single report. The conference left me with a feeling of confidence in the way that institutional researchers are tackling some of the major changes in the industry. Adaptability is key in making sure that participation in research remains high, and I saw evidence of many institutions innovating their current practices to address these needs. Overall, it was a great conference where I had a great time connecting with old friends and making new ones. I’m looking forward to seeing everyone in Halifax for CIRPA 2015!...
 

Cell phones: they can be used as video cameras, for shopping lists, as gaming platforms, to keep up with friends, as a news source, in place of a weather station…and…Oh right, they can also be used as telephones. Mobile devices are already ubiquitous. Many of us sleep with them beside us and the phantom notification of a text message is a hallucination nearly all of us have at one time experienced. Mobile devices have changed the way we live in a major way. More importantly for the market research industry, they are often the device used to complete our research surveys. At Insightrix, we’ve kept an eye how many respondents complete our surveys on a mobile device, and that number has been steadily increasing over the last few years. The change in how respondents are participating in research is especially important for the younger demographic where smartphone penetration is high and participation in surveys tend to be lower. Making surveys more mobile-friendly has become an imperative to make sure that we get participation from these key demographic groups. Size Matters Screen sizes vary considerably between mobile devices. For a survey researcher, this means that careful consideration must be given to making sure that the question and answer options display correctly for the respondent. The best practice is to detect the screen size and adjust the way the question displays accordingly. It is generally preferred to have the scrolling vertical-only while avoiding the horizontal scroll. This means that scale questions may have to be altered to become drop-downs, vertical sliders, or an open-ended response text box. And let’s face it, we’ve all probably had the misfortune of having to scroll and zoom into a non-mobile-optimized web page in order to click the link we wanted – resulting in significant frustration, and more often than not, an uncompleted survey. Similarly, usability is important for surveys as well. Give thought to how respondents will answer the survey questions. Most devices have a touch screen, so it’s best practice to make sure that the selections are finger-sized or otherwise easy to select. If they need to type a text answer, if possible, ensure that the question remains visible as they type. Size may also be an issue with regards to bandwidth. Although nearly all devices today support videos and pictures, it may take time for the media to download which can be a pain-point for the respondent. Also, including videos in a survey can cause the respondent to use a significant portion of their data plan. Be choosy. If including multimedia questions, warn participants before they get into the survey that there are large data requirements to participate. This could alter the decision in which mobile device the respondent may use. Streamline the Survey More often than not, respondents are reluctant to complete a long survey on a mobile device, which can result in a high drop-off rate and difficulty getting the participation needed. To make your survey more mobile-friendly, be prepared to take a serious look at what issues are most important to include on the survey – and which can be cut. There are many important components to making sure that respondents have a positive survey experience. Because it’s difficult to type lengthy answers using a mobile device, keep the number of open-ends to a minimum. Tighten up the wording as much as possible for both the questions and answer options. Consider the question style. See if there is anything you can do to simplify it. For example, it may be enough to ask a respondent to choose one item from a short pick list, rather than rate each item on a scale. At times it may be better to allow the respondent to provide the answer in text format, rather than choose from a drop-down list. Endeavor to modernize the look of the survey as well as the questions themselves – extra nice-to-haves like unnecessary introductory sentences, logos, or footers should be eliminated for an improved respondent experience. If your research absolutely requires a long survey, consider the option of a split sample approach. You can use an abridged list of questions for those completing on a mobile device while sending those on desktops through the longer survey or send all respondents through one of two optimized versions. Take advantage of the methodology Researchers may need to give up on some things, like certain question styles, multimedia elements and lengthy or comprehensive questions to make sure that the survey experience is mobile friendly. But that doesn’t mean that catering to respondents completing surveys on their mobile device is necessarily a net-negative for the depth or breadth of data quality. In fact, the methodology also has a lot of positives that can be advantageous to market researchers. Because mobile devices are often with us out-of-home, it provides the opportunity for researchers to get top-of-mind insights, wherever the respondent happens to be. This can be especially fruitful when using SMS survey invitations. Nearly all mobile devices are equipped with a camera and microphone, which means that using video recording, audio recording and picture capabilities can be used to gain insight that would be difficult or impossible using other methodologies. Integrating survey research into the respondents’ lives by allowing them to use the device that’s most natural for them makes for a positive experience. We hope that this will lead to increased participation in market research in the long run – whether that participation takes place on the telephone, desktop computer, mobile device, or whatever new technology the future will bring.   hbspt.forms.create({ portalId: '374811', formId: '05fef899-65c7-408e-9c1d-d9e972faf0c7' }); [/fullwidth]...
 

Saskatoon, Sask. (Aug. 6, 2014) – Montreal Canadiens of the National Hockey League (NHL) have the strongest brand among professional sports teams in the country, concludes an opinion survey with Canadian sports fans released today by Insightrix Research Inc. Toronto Maple Leafs, also of the NHL, ranked second, Saskatchewan Roughriders of the Canadian Football League (CFL) was third and Toronto Blue Jays, Canada’s lone team in Major League Baseball (MLB) was fourth. Insightrix, an internationally-recognized research firm based in Saskatoon, conducted the survey in collaboration with the Phoenix Group, a Regina-based advertising and branding agency. “A total of 2,676 randomly-selected sports fans were polled online May 8-26 in nine Canadian metro areas that are home to professional sports franchises,” explained Mario Caceres, senior research executive with Insightrix. “Results were weighted to accurately represent the population in each metro area as a percentage of the national population and by the proportion of followers of each sports league in those areas.” Metro areas surveyed were: Calgary, Edmonton, Hamilton, Montreal, Ottawa, Regina, Toronto, Vancouver and Winnipeg. Because the research was conducted online, he said it is considered to be a non-probability proportion sample and therefore, margins of error are not applicable. Sports fans from the nine metro areas that are home to professional sports franchises were asked a series of questions to better understand their perception of NHL, CFL and MLB as well as the National Basketball Association (NBA) and Major League Soccer (MLS) team brands in Canada. Five key brand metrics were measured including first brand that comes to mind, their level of respect for team brands as well as their perception of the most loyal fans, team popularity and stadium atmosphere, Caceres said. “The top four brand rankings were developed using a statistically-valid combination of the team’s rankings in each of the categories surveyed,” he said. The most respected team is the Canadiens, followed by the Roughriders, Blue Jays and Alouettes. When it comes to popularity, fans perceive the Montreal Canadiens to be the most popular, followed by the Saskatchewan Roughriders, Toronto Maple Leafs and Montreal Alouettes. The Canadiens edge out the Roughriders as the team perceived to have the most loyal fans. Across all leagues the Montreal Canadiens have the strongest brand nationally followed by the Toronto Maple Leafs, the Saskatchewan Roughriders and the Toronto Blue Jays. The top ten brands across all sports include three NHL teams, four CFL teams, one team each from the NBA, MLB and MLS. The research reveals that individual NHL brands are very strong, but mostly in their local or regional markets. CFL brands also consistently show strength in local markets, however CFL teams enjoy greater out of market brand affinity. Toronto and Montreal-based team rankings across all sports benefitted from the larger population base in their local areas. Following is a snap shot of the survey results. Results reflect the proportion of the national population selecting that team as top for that question. Most Respected 1)Montreal Canadiens – 22.6% 2)Saskatchewan Roughriders – 12.2% 3)Toronto Blue Jays – 9.1% 4)Montreal Alouettes – 7.5% Perception of Popularity 1)Montreal Canadiens – 20.8% 2)Saskatchewan Roughriders – 16.5% 3)Toronto Maple Leafs – 15.0% 4)Montreal Alouettes – 7.2% Perception Most Loyal Fans 1)Montreal Canadiens – 22.5% 2)Saskatchewan Roughriders – 22.1% 3)Toronto Maple Leafs – 19.9% 4)Toronto Raptors – 6.7% Perception of Best Stadium/Arena Atmosphere 1)Montreal Canadiens – 24.4% 2)Saskatchewan Roughriders – 16.2% 3)Toronto Maple Leafs – 10.5% 4)Toronto Raptors (Tie) – 6.9% 4)Montreal Alouettes (Tie) – 6.9% First Brand that Comes to Mind 1)Toronto Blue Jays – 19.2% 2)Montreal Canadiens – 18.5% 3)Toronto Maple Leafs – 14.8% 4)Toronto Raptors – 12.3% Canadian Professional Sports Brand Ranking (Based on combined weighted results) First: Montreal Canadiens Second: Toronto Maple Leafs Third: Saskatchewan Roughriders Fourth: Toronto Blue Jays Click here to view additional details. About Insightrix Research Insightrix Research Inc. (Insightrix.com), established in 2001 and based in Saskatoon, is a full-service market research firm that uses a range of qualitative and quantitative market research techniques to provide effective, innovative solutions. Insightrix has achieved the Gold Seal certification from the Marketing Research Intelligence Association (MRIA), the country’s market research association. About the Phoenix Group Phoenix Group (www.thephoenixgroup.ca), established in 1982, is an employee owned, Saskatchewan based advertising and branding agency. They are a full service communications firm serving clients across Western Canada. Phoenix Group’s subsidiary, Oh! Media (www.Ohmedia.ca) serves clients across Canada and is fully integrated into the agency. Phoenix Group has been the Saskatchewan Roughriders Agency of Record since 1997. For more information contact: Mario Caceres Senior Research Executive Insightrix Research Inc. +1.306.657.5640 Ext. 258 mario.caceres@insightrix.com Darren Mitchell VP Strategic Development Phoenix Group +1.306.585.9500 dmitchell@thephoenixgroup.ca...
 

Dashboards are a great way to present information, especially when the data needs to be shown at a high level. Digital dashboards are collections of key reports, metrics, KPIs, and other data that provide relevant context and highlight the essential elements of a research study. They are a great tool for presenting information to executives who may only have a few minutes to review and make decisions about a project. Here are five key points to consider when developing dashboards for executives. #1. Dashboards are not scorecards. Scorecards are report cards for your projects. Scorecards measure performance against goals, show the success/failure of specific metrics, and are utilized once a project is complete. Dashboards, on the other hand, are used throughout a project and offer a snapshot of a study’s progress. Dashboards are a collection of reports, KPIs, and comments from consumers, all of which provide context for the status of a project. #2. Looks matter. A dashboard needs to convey information quickly and clearly, so appearance is very important. All elements of a dashboard, including gauges, colour, highlights, and fonts, are critical to ensuring that messages are communicated efficiently. #3. Dashboards should be actionable. Every dashboard should be created with the goal of making the data actionable. Since organizations collect large amounts of data, dashboards need to provide an overview of the most relevant information in a concise, clear manner. Remember that dashboards are not reports: their function is to assist with the decision-making process. #4. A one-size-fits-all approach does not work. While dashboards keep track of the relevant information for a project, the same information and style of presentation will not meet the needs of all hierarchical levels. According to dashboardinsight.com, performance dashboards can be loosely categorized into four levels, and each should include a different number of metrics: CEO/board level – about six high-level metrics Corporate vice president/director level – between 12 and 20 metrics IT strategic level – range of 12 to 50 metrics IT operational level – around 20 metrics Always begin dashboard design with a clear understanding of the end user and his or her executive level. While different levels of users will require various dashboard views, remember that you can create filters to extract the information required for each type of user. #5. Focus on simplicity. Poorly designed dashboards gather huge amounts of data on one screen, preventing clear understanding and slowing down decision making. With more and more web applications using a minimalist design (a change for the better), dashboards need to be clear and simple. Use clear fonts, appropriate whitespace ratios, and iconography to guide the user through the dashboard....