There are several Saskatchewan device usage trends marketers need to know about.  It used to be that only the richest and most influential had access to a mobile phone – we called them car phones. Eventually mobile phone became small enough to be portable – we carried them around in dedicated briefcases and thought we were cool doing it. By the 70s, we got our first look at a real handheld device - the first handheld cellular was over 20 cm long, weighed over 2 pounds and took over 10 hours to recharge after only 30 minutes of use. Ah, the dark days of early adoption. By the 90s, things began to change – personal cellphones, while still far from common, were starting to appear much more often. By the early 00s, being able to access the internet became a critical feature for cellphones. Soon we adapted more smart technology, and in just a few short years, the cellphone quickly became the smartphone. In 2015 (roughly fifteen years after Zach Morris made his mark on the world), smartphone ownership became the norm with 68% of Canadian households owning a cellphone. Now fast forward 2 years (according to the 2016 Saskatchewan Media Habits Syndicated Study), and 84% of Saskatchewan households have a smartphone! That’s a pretty fast adoption of device technology for a province that has admittedly been one of the low-tech adopters (in rural areas) in the wireless internet, 5G and the race to build accessible LTE data networks. In Saskatchewan, smartphone ownership fluctuates across demographics but it becomes pretty apparent that it declines with age ↘ For matures (68+) in Saskatchewan, smartphone adoption hasn’t really penetrated, as only 58% of residents reported owning a smartphone – far below the national average (even from 2 years ago). Unlike matures, baby boomers in Saskatchewan (49 – 67) tend to be better with adopting new tech as 79% of those we surveyed claim to own a smartphone. In contrast, youth have quickly adopted mobile technology. Respondents under the age of 48 are likely to be carrying around a smartphone (94% ownership) – which is much higher than the provincial average of 84% smartphone ownership. In teens (14 – 17), smartphone ownership accounts for 99% of the residents we surveyed.                            Let that sink in a bit. And that’s just talking about smartphones! In a changing landscape of devices, each with their own screen and internet hookup, it is important to have the right information to know how to plan your strategy. Do you find yourself asking… What is the average screen time people are putting on their devices? Which devices are getting the most play? What kind content are people engaging with on these devices?   Below are a few key consumer trends you need to know about device usage in Saskatchewan. 1. It turns out that Saskatchewan residents, who are under the age of 32, use their smartphones more than 20 hours per week! ????  That is nearly one full day a week devoted to screen time – and that does not include time being spent on other devices (laptops, desktops and tablets). For those who are over the age of 32, the amount of time spent on a smartphone for personal use decreases as they get older (see the chart above). *Interesting to note - time spent using devices other than smartphones (laptops, desktops, and tablets) doesn’t vary by age in the same way that smartphone usage does. 2. People are putting more screen time in than last year ↗ When it comes to the amount of time people are spending on their devices, usage is starting to peak. We asked respondents if they spent more time than last year on their devices and found that when it comes to smartphones and 43% of respondents stated they spent more time on them than last year.   The story is similar with tablets, as 19% say they spent more time on their tablet than they did the previous year.   Desktop and laptop screen time is also on the rise. Fifteen percent (15%) say they use them more than last they did the previous year. Even that old, standby television is still getting action. As a common household device, it still remains popular with residents. 3. Content choices vary across devices ▶ Now if you’re talking about what residents are watching on their screens, we found that choice of content varies depending on which device they are using. Residents reported they tend to use their smartphones very little to view movies or television shows, stating they spend only 4% of their time on the device viewing each. Identical viewing times (4% each – movies and television shows) were reported on tablets, as well. Desktop and laptop computers received greater amounts of screen time – respondents stated they spend 12% of their time on the devices watching movies, and 9% watching television shows. Television still dominates in content viewership by quite a large margin. Respondents reported that 80% of the time they spend on their televisions is spent watching movies, and 83% watching television shows.   Interesting to note: Televisions are also changing how content can be viewed – televisions have become “smart” and now allows viewers to access the internet, stream movie applications (such as Netflix or Hulu) or even check their social media. In fact, what we call “televisions” have changed and evolved so greatly over the past several years that they are almost unrecognizable when compared to televisions of the 1980s and 90s. These changes, including PVRs and the earlier mentioned “smart” connectivity have allowed television to remain a dominant medium while still coming in second in use to smartphones.   Looking Forward: 3 Key Takeaways  ✅ Smartphones are the most used device and the one on which most of people’s time is spent, especially by younger age groups. Smartphones have changed user behaviour as consumers now connect to internet from everywhere. ✅ There is a rapid adoption of new technologies and devices, especially among younger generations. This is changing media consumption habits and preferences among Saskatchewan consumers. The change in viewing habits on multiple devices gives marketers an opportunity to reach out to these consumers across different platforms. ✅ Media plans must expand across multiple channels as markets develop.   For more information, download your Saskatchewan Device Usage Report. ...
 

In an era where every Internet user has a journey to share and is the storyteller of their own immediate world – the question is – how often does your brand take into consideration that it needs to do the same?  In business, we often interpret the act of purchasing products as a purely transactional experience – one that is solely between a business and its consumer. It is rare that a brand superimposes its ability to sell you a human experience past why their product is made for you. Too often, their marketing ensures how the offering will ultimately give you a better lifestyle experience, yet few rarely provide a narrative experience for the human in you. But times they are a changin’, as Dylan sang. Take this for example - no lies - I nearly shed a tear while watching a Duracell commercial. https://youtu.be/tSlUH2WmkYA That’s it folks – a battery commercial tugged on my heartstrings and it had me thinking: How…. but why…. BUT HOW? Well – to put it simply – the brand told me a story I could relate to and the "offering" was humanized as a story...
 

In a recent Insightrix article on neuroscience, we discussed the trend of neuromarketing, or as preferred for our purposes, using neuroscience tools and methodologies in the field of market research. Aside from leaving many wracked with existential dread, the article on neuroscience raises a few questions about how the processes described in the post actually work and how they are useful in the field of market research. If you haven’t yet, you may want to give it a read, as it will fill in any blanks from this post and tell you why this is relevant to market research. As Insightrix is all about providing answers, we decided to write another blog article to talk about it and provide some clarity regarding the ways neuroscience is used in market research. In the last post, we mention EEG, eye tracking and facial coding, so we’ll go from there. EEG (Electroencephalogram)  EEG (electroencephalogram) can be a powerful addition to the toolkit of market researchers. In the field of market research, EEG biosensors are used to measure changes in participants’ brain activity to try to track changes in participants’ levels of attention to what they are seeing and/or hearing. With interpretation, this can be a useful tool for researchers wishing to know what parts of their content (video/commercial/film/etc.) held an audience’s attention best, and where that audience’s attention strayed from their message. EEGs monitor changes in the electrical activity in the brain and allow researchers to measure changes in the levels of attention participants  experience when viewing and/or listening to content (video/advertisement/movie clip/etc.), or when trying a new product. Theoretically, when attention is high, electrical activity in the brain increases, and when attention is low, electrical activity falls. With data derived from this process, market researchers can discover what points of the experience were most interesting (held participants’ attention), and what parts caused attention to drift. EEG biosensors are relatively small and, as a result, they are portable. This means marketers can use them almost anywhere (stores, theatres, wherever) to get responses and data in natural settings.   Eye Tracking    Now that you are armed with the understanding of what your participants’ attention levels are doing, you’ll need to have some kind of way to find out where that attention is being directed. That’s where eye tracking comes in. Eye trackers are usually portable, multi-camera apparatuses that track participants’ eye-movements (of course), how long something is looked at and (in some models) even track the number of times a participant blinks. The data generated from this lets market researchers know just where participants are looking, and for how long they looked at it. Many eye trackers are extra useful, in that they come with software that allows researchers to designate specific elements in the test material to see how many times a specific field was looked at, and how long and how many people looked at it. This can be very useful if you want to know how noticeable a brand logo or your visual messaging is. Data from eye trackers is represented with the help of some handy and sophisticated software in graphic visualizations. Generally, these visualizations can be in the form of Heat Mapping, Bee Swarms (no, not real bees) and/or Gaze Plotting. If you want to see what this looks like, check out the video attached to this post.  Like EEG biosensors, eye trackers are relatively inexpensive and can be set up almost anywhere – some can even be attached to laptops or phones.When used in conjunction with other neuro tools and tried-and-true techniques like in-depth interviews and focus groups, eye trackers can provide very powerful data.  Facial Coding Now that you think you understand at what points your participant is interested and attentive, and to where and at what your participant is looking, it would be nice to have some idea about what your participant might be feeling in regards to what she is looking at. This is where facial coding can be useful. Facial coding uses existing facial recognition technology (like the kind they use to track down criminals or create matches on dating sites) to try to learn about participants’ emotional state in relation to test materials. With cameras and some really complicated software, researchers try to detect seven basic, universal emotions in participants. These emotions have been proven through a great deal of testing and re-testing (of the scientific kind) to be associated to seven basic facial expressions (disgust, delight, sadness, skeptical, surprised, fear and negative emotions like anger). These facial expressions are universal and are the same in everybody, regardless of age, culture or ethnic background. It is hoped that using facial coding technology as a tool in market research can allow researchers to read their participants’ emotional responses before they are able to rationalize them into thought and words. The goal is to give an impression of the knee-jerk responses your test materials engender in observers – data that is useful if you want to know if your product is being well received or not. And there it is… There you have it – some of the most common tools used in the field of neuroscience, and particularly, in neuroscience as it employed in the field of market research. It doesn’t take a degree in neuropsychology or neurobiology, or even one in marketing, to understand how, when put together with the other tools described in this article and adept interpretation, combined with tried-and-true market research methodologies like in-depth interviews and focus groups, can come together to make a powerful toolkit for market researchers. With that said, these techniques require a caveat when used in market research in that they are useful and appropriate only in specific settings. The human mind is ridiculously complex, and attempting to understand its processes through machines can produce less trustworthy data if well-defined and rigorous research design is not put in place. Most market researchers who employ neuroscience methodologies advocate their use in conjunction with tried-and-true market research methodologies like focus groups and/or in-depth interviews. If you’d like to understand more about why neuroscience in market research is used in the first place, check out this article about just that. Keep checking back to the Insightrix blog regularly for updates on how Insightrix uses neuroscience and other cutting-edge techniques and methodologies in its own client projects.     Sources: neursky.com/neuromarketing-and-eeg-measuring-engagement-in-advertising scholar.google.ca/ijps/article lcbr-online.com/index_files/proceedingsemc12 greenbookblog.org/neuromarketing-identifying-the-fact-from-the-fiction/...
 

Trying to figure out millennials and how to market to them effectively has been quite the topic of discussion of late. Actually, every time we are on the cusp of a new generation set to become the primary purchasers in Canada, we flock to their archetype and often attempt to exploit it. But it seems nobody can get a handle on who these millennials are and what they are all about. What a typical millennial problem… According to StatCan, this demographic makes up a significant portion of the population of Saskatchewan – not only that – but we actually have more young people, per capita. So… shouldn’t there be a way to understand their media habits and ensure advertising can effectively target them? This head-scratcher is often brought up at Insightrix in attempt to better segment younger users and learn their media behaviours (This is similar to what we've recently accomplished for a favourite CFL brand, the Saskatchewan Roughriders). To better understand millennials and their media behaviours, Insightrix recently examined its Saskatchewan Digital Democracy syndicated series, which answers questions like:  What social media platform is most popular among teens, millennials, gen-X'ers or baby boomers in Saskatchewan? How many residents are engaging with more than one social platform, and if so, which ones? The syndicated study measures media usage among generations, including determining the ways people in Saskatchewan connect and their preference of social media platforms like Facebook, Snapchat, Twitter or Instagram. This syndicated study continues our ongoing Saskatchewan Data Insider Series which tracks how Saskatchewan engages online.  If you’re interested in a teaser report outlining how, access it free here.   When it comes to individuals aged 26 to 31 in the province - 97% use social media of some kind. Here's a breakdown of social media usage by millennials: Though you might not guess it - believe it or not - most millennials believe they spend too much time on social media, while 42% say the time they spend on these sites is, “about right”. Only 1% said they believed they should spend more time on social media: Not only that, but more than half of SK millennials (54%) claim checking their phone is the last thing they do before bed.  Because millennials think they spend too much time on social media, it can said that over promoting to this group has its drawbacks because of the over exposure it may cause. Millennials are the group that is more likely "hide" your social media promotions if they crowd their news feeds.  Do you think millennials are easy or hard to market to?    Syndicated Series In our syndicated report, you’ll find further information about social media usage of millennials in Saskatchewan, as well as media habits across other age demographics. This data can inform your advertising efforts, giving you a valuable addition to your marketing toolkit. For a social media snapshot, access your free eBook and get highlights from the syndicated report. Or, even better, purchase the entire report and gain an understanding of the media habits of Saskatchewan residents across all age demographics.  ...
 

 A person is able to articulate their wants and desires through conscious, reflective deliberation, through weighing facts and arguments and through making rational decisions, right?   Right? Actually - probably not. While most of us think we are consciously creating all of our thoughts and decisions through rational processes, research in the field of neuroscience has actually told us something else might be going on. Making decisions or forming opinions like this may not actually be the reality when it comes to our reactions to new situations, ideas or even products – really, in any situation in which you react emotionally. According to neuroscience, that’s because most emotional decisions of this kind are made unconsciously. Think about it. When you see something new, and you feel a certain way about it, do you think about why you should feel the way you do first - or do you just feel a certain way about that thing or situation and then try to find reasons for the reaction you are having? Most likely, you thought about your feelings a bit, and decided why you felt the way you did. If that is the case, you are normal – or as normal as the rest of us, anyway. According to neuroscience research, qualitative decisions of an emotional nature are often made on the unconscious level – meaning these decisions are made with little or no authorship of the observer. Aside from the existential angst this may provoke (remember to breathe), this has more than a few implications when it comes to market research.   Neuroscience in market research People’s knowledge and understanding of their own wants and desires is usually dependent on their own power to describe and articulate those wants and desires to themselves. This self-articulation allows them to form opinions about those desires. This state of affairs might create all kinds of issues in the field of market research, as so much of what market researchers do depends on asking people what they think and feel about a certain thing, situation or idea. What happens when the participants in market research might not actually know why they feel the way they do – that they just feel a certain way about a thing or situation and think up reasons for their feelings after feeling them? You can imagine that in situations like this, the data gathered might be problematic at best. Many traditional, qualitative market research methods (focus groups, surveys, etc.) rely on participants’ conscious thoughts and their conscious creation of ideas and words to express those thoughts to the researcher. To try to get around this challenge, many market research firms have adopted neuroscientific techniques and methodologies, adapting them to fit the demands specific to market research. Used in the field of market research, the use of neuroscience techniques is referred to as Neuromarketing. This term, though, gives many in the field of market research serious pause, as the practice in question has little to do with marketing itself and more to do with the market research process – it has more to do with discovery than selling. For our intents and purposes, then, for this article the practice will be referred to as the use of neuroscience in market research.       So what’s it all about? Neuroscience is not about reading people’s minds or predicting consumer behaviour. As far as we know, nothing can do that. Rather, using neuroscience in market research is about attempting to use technology to get around the need for participants to describe their feelings, bypass participants’ conscious reactions and their conscious creation of thoughts and words and try to uncover participants’ unfiltered reactions about a product, idea or situation. The means by which researchers try to read participants’ emotional reactions are through an array of techniques and gadgets that monitor changes in participants’ physical states, allowing researchers to interpret these changes. It is these interpretations that result in data. Some common techniques and tools to attempt this are EEG monitoring (to try to track participants’ levels of attention to what they see and/or hear), eye tracking (to track where participants are looking) and facial coding (to attempt to track how participants feel about what they experience). All of these tools and techniques may give market researchers a look into participants’ unrationalized feelings and reactions, without having to get participants to describe how they feel. These feelings that we are told have been provided by participants without their filtering or rationalization could, ostensibly, provide much more reliable qualitative data.   For a case study describing neuroscience tools we use for market research, click here. This is probably why the neuroscience market is expected to grow at a compound annual growth rate of 2.9%, reaching a market value of over $30.8 billion by 2020. That’s not to say tried-and-true qualitative market research techniques like focus groups and in-depth interviewing are doomed to obscurity. Far from it. There is no one market research tool or technique that will give you all the answers – including neuroscience. In fact, most market researchers who employ neuroscience techniques and tools in market research rely on the established and dependable methods we’ve all come to count on in conjunction with neuroscience. Most market researchers believe there is a great amount of value in participants’ own descriptions of their feelings and their involvement in the research process, itself. A Proven Method? Who’s to say what the filtering and rationalization we all use to describe our emotions actually plays in decision-making and the formation of emotional reactions? There is still much that is unknown about this process. For this reason and others, forthright market researchers who employ neuroscience techniques and tools usually adhere to proven methods like focus groups and in-depth interviews to back up and gain insight from the data acquired through this form of research.  The field of neuroscience and its tools can provide a lot of data when it comes to understanding the reactions of market research participants. Through a mix of the use of neuroscience technology and methodology in addition to proven market research techniques, market researchers can better access the feelings and attitudes of their participants. For more information on neuroscience techniques and tools used in the field of market research, check out the Insightrix Blog. Also, have a look at a case study describing one of the Insightrix research projects in which these techniques were used.   Sources: http://www.marketingprofs.com/opinions/2016/29822/what-neuroscience-can-teach-us-about-marketing http://www.grandviewresearch.com/industry-analysis/neuroscience-market https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/278922 http://www.greenbookblog.org/2017/01/19/neuromarketing-identifying-the-fact-from-the-fiction/ http://essay.utwente.nl/65342/1/Roth_BA_MB.pdf...