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"The whole is greater than the sum of its parts." - Aristotle Customer experience (CX) and Voice of the Customer (VoC) programs are an essential element of business intelligence because they inform stakeholders about how customers view their organization. In general, they focus on: Understanding what drives customers attitudes and behaviors Predicting the future attitudes and behaviours of customers Maximizing customers' future positive attitudes and behaviours Our framework encompasses a holistic measurement of Customer Experience and Voice of Customer for both relationship and transaction surveys, driver analysis at the transaction level, priority setting among the different transactions, overall evaluation of different facets of the customer relationship and relationship driver analysis against an overall performance metric. Holistic Customer Experience Measurement There are two key components to this framework: 1. The relationship a customer has with the organization. 2. Direct feedback a customer has from a recent transaction/interaction with the organization. Using the quantitative framework outlined below, research is conducted in these two components simultaneously and is aimed at delivering a holistic outlook from a bird’s eye view of the organization, connecting the strategic elements of the business with its operational components. Relationship Surveys Relationship surveys are designed to gauge the entire relationship that a customer has with an organization and are less influenced by recent interactions/transactions. Their outcomes tend to be more stable and to fluctuate less over time. Relationship assessment surveys provide strategic guidance on organization-wide initiatives. Such surveys are longer (often 10-15 minutes in length) but are conducted among a relatively lower volume of customer respondents. As the nature of the underlying relationships (i.e., perceptions of high-level service experiences and overall value of the relationship) rarely changes quickly over time, it is not generally necessary to undergo continuous measurement for such surveys. Rather, they can be conducted periodically (i.e., annually). Transaction Surveys Feedback on transaction surveys is influenced by a customer's recent experience with an organization, often around a given process or “touch point” (e.g., a visit to the company's website, interaction with a technician or contact with a customer call centre). Compared to relationship surveys, post-transactional surveys tend to be less static and fluctuate more over a shorter period. Post-transactional measurement is appropriate for providing process improvement diagnostics and for measuring/managing the performance of mid- to lower-level managers in an organization (e.g., technician managers, customer service managers, call centre managers, managers with control of/responsibility for specific customer processes or services). For post-transactional surveys, the survey length is short (e.g., optimally, three to five minutes in length, content-focused on just one type of interaction or customer touch point, the volume of data collection is high and interviewing is conducted in as short a period of time as possible after the interaction. This way, individual process/service managers can receive feedback on the specific customer experience they are in control of and can be held accountable for the results. In designing this CX and VoC framework, we use an approach that recognizes these two types of surveys are different but connected, using the outline below. Linking Relationship Surveys & Transaction Surveys The linkage between the Relationship Surveys and Transaction Survey occurs in Service Culture. Essentially, on the Relationship Survey within the area of Service Culture, the survey has two parts: a series of statements at the strategic level about the level of service provided by the organization. These are typically more brand promise statements, such as “how would you rate the organization on being easy to work with? Showing interest in customers”? However, a section for those who might have had a recent transaction with the organization can also be included. This post-contact section within the relationship survey helps determine which of the touch points (i.e., Transaction Survey) drive the overall metric. However, in going beyond just the bird’s eye view we also encourage organizations to look inward and elicit feedback from their employees through an Employee Experience (EX) program. The overall goal of the EX program is to develop a transparent, two-way conversation process between the organization's management and front-line employees to address internal elements that contribute to CX concerns/issues. Beyond the Bird's Eye View Our approach recognizes that front-line employees play a critical role when it comes to delivering exceptional CX, as they possess a unique perspective of having direct experience with customers and insights on how customers are reacting to services. By empowering front-line employees to participate in the CX problem-solving process and by listening and incorporating their feedback, an organization will be able to secure greater buy-in from its front-line employees on future CX initiatives, better understand the customer service challenges front-line employees encounter and gain a more comprehensive understanding of the overall customer experience journey. This, in turn, will lead to more engaged and committed front-line employees who will further enrich the CX program - making it even more holistic. The recommended approach is to run both a quantitative survey aimed at collecting data over time on specific metrics as it relates to employee engagement that measure the impacts of specific changes or initiatives that have been implemented. We also recommend a qualitative discussion board that is aimed to collect more in-depth feedback on specific issues, with shorter turnaround. The intent of the qualitative piece of the research is to help organizations act fast and come up with solutions that are driven by employee feedback, creating stronger buy-in. This latter approach also allows organizations to rectify issues before they can cause a noticeable decline in key performance indicators (KPIs) collected through the quantitative piece of the research. These two research components work together to provide the full employee experience picture. However, in going beyond just the bird’s eye view we also encourage organizations to look inward and elicit feedback from their employees through an Employee Experience (EX) program. Would you like to know more about Insightrix CX Programs? To find out more about specific measures, timing, costs and how the Insightrix Holistic CX program could work for you, please contact Shonna Caldwell, our Chief Revenue Officer. ...
 

If you have ever wondered - then you can learn a lot from your competitors using web data extraction. Web data is accessible in many public domains - corporate websites, news forums and even social media like Twitter and Reddit. But even the most technically minded among us may run in the opposite direction when they hear anyone suggesting a  data extraction project. But, as an insights agency, we do not run away from data science - we run toward it. After all, it is quality data that drives our clients' business strategies. And, dare I say it - what is so scary about that? Web Data Extraction Accessing web data can be leveraged in a way that diversifies your data - but web data extraction using the traditional "Google search" can require a great deal of time and effort given the size of the "web jungle" out there. Our extraction solution is simple - by using proprietary software and processes, Insightrix can crawl the web using advanced programming capabilities, and scrape it for valuable information related to your brand or organization or any topic of interest. We have seen our clients use web data extraction results with great success - and since the internet is continuously growing, the volume of web data analyzed is increasing. In market research, web data extraction is employed for many facets of business: Historical data is valuable - Think about it this way; whether you are a public service, in agriculture or a consultancy, having insights into historical trends can be critical for any kind of trend analysis - especially pricing data. Support your R&D - Spending more time in R&D could mean...
 

Stay connected & informed with Employee Engagement surveys In today’s times, because of business problems brought about by the coronavirus pandemic, uncertainty has pushed millions to work from home. It is because of these concerns leaders in many organizations are looking to business continuity strategies they have already put in place. Many have already modified their business operations to accommodate this new reality we find ourselves in – a reality that requires immediate consultation with your employees to try and adapt processes to be more suitable to remote environments. In the current business landscape, with all the challenges and uncertainty brought about by the pandemic, it is critical to know how your employees are handling their work and whether they have the means and the support they need to succeed. Employee engagement seems like a bizarre thought when most of us are displaced and working by means of networks, video chats and instant messages. But what about letting them know they are heard and valued? Lift employee listening with employee surveys If you haven’t already done so, consider engaging with employees with regular questionnaires to check in on how your employees are managing during these unprecedented times. A pulse survey approach can be used with regularly scheduled surveys administered to staff every few weeks or so to track changes as your company implements new ways of managing day-to-day operations in response to COVID-19 and the reopening of the economy. You can use this data to see how your people are adjusting, what they may need or have questions about and areas where you can create more clarity for your staff around new procedures or policies. With more and more employees working from home, it is very important that employees stay connected to your organizational goals and modifiers are made to company cultures to accommodate for this change. Though it may look a bit different than it did a few months ago, listening to employees so you can get valuable information to continue to connect individual work to the greater good is extremely important for engagement and performance. Often it is the small things that are overlooked during times of quick decision-making. For instance, while organizations were busy preparing for overhauls in technology, software and networking capabilities – there was a spike in those working from home experiencing back pain and neck soreness from improper office equipment (Brandwatch Bulletin, 05/05/20). While organizations were preparing their technology capabilities, small things like office chairs, keyboards and mice were of utmost importance to those who have had to shift their way of working almost overnight. A continuance in culture A survey program is a great way to protect your work culture and continue to share your values – live your values. Showing employees their input is heard is vital to getting through this crisis and moving your company forwards both during and after COVID-19. Collecting your employee’s opinions lets them know you care about how they are feeling and managing during what is a stressful and challenging time for them. Employees have been through a lot over these past months and they will need continuing support and guidance from their organization. To move forward, organizations need to continue to show they are listening to their people – looking ahead and adapting to concerns and perceptions and modifying company cultures to accommodate new ways of working. It could be you are looking to get back to the office as soon as possible, or you may be looking to make remote working the new normal for your organization. Employee engagement surveys will give you the information you need to make these organizational changes with confidence. Through employee engagement surveys, you can get help understanding answers to questions like: What concerns or needs do employees have? How are managers handling things? Are employees clear on expectations in this changing environment? Do employees feel engaged? Are they connected to organizational goals? When you uncover issues and concerns among employees, you aren’t just informing your business strategy – you are showing that you are willing to listen to their concerns and act. Ensure employees are getting the right tools and information When you’ve launched your employee engagement surveys, you will gain an abundance of information that will aid in decision-making – both now and in the new reality we will find ourselves in months from now. Employee engagement can be defined as the strength of the mental and emotional connection employees feel towards their places of work. To feel this connection, employees require: The right information The right equipment Managerial and organizational support Valuable insight to support strategic decisions Employee engagement surveys are an important tool in assessing and understanding how your people are coping and adjusting to new organizational procedures as we shift the future of work. They are also a powerful approach to both communicate to your employees that you are listening to their concerns and inform your business strategy. Interested in getting started on an employee engagement program? Contact us! We'd love to chat about getting started.    ...
 

Market research and data science are related entities; combining the insights from both disciplines leads to a deeper understanding of marketing issues. In general, there seems to be confusion about what “data science” is, and how it relates to traditional market research....
 

Have you been wanting to start listening to Stories of Market Research: The Insightrix Podcast, but don't know which episode to start with? Check out our handy episode guide to get descriptions and information about each podcast episode we've published so far....
 

Three of the Biggest Market Research Trends Since 2010 The world of market research has changed, meaning the role of a research supplier has been forced to change. With the evolution of technology, pressure building on clients to solve critical business problems and the need for more agile research solutions, the role of a market researcher can now be defined as an insights professional. Insightrix has responded to the evolution of trends in the industry by shifting our client service philosophy to provide innovative solutions and actionable insights, and by becoming more of a partner to our clients. The following infographic outlines how Insightrix has responded to three of the major trends impacting the market research industry over the last decade and the innovation we've engaged in to meet them. ...
 

What's the difference? The terms data visualization and data representation can be easy to confuse. They sound pretty similar, and at first glance, one may find it's tricky to keep the two straight. And since data is ubiquitous these days, we are seeing more examples of both almost everywhere from our watches and fitness bands to the apps on our phones and dashboards on our computers.  Both have been employed in insights research and reporting for some time and they both fulfill specific functions. They both sound pretty similar, too, and they do similar things – it’s no wonder how it can be hard keeping data visualization and data representation straight. So, we've created a new downloadable infographic to explain the differences between the two and how they are used. We've been using it around our offices to help our researchers and data professionals explain the styles of data representation or data visualizations we might utilize in our reports. We've also been employing it to work with research professionals who are new to the field to help them also become acquainted with the uses and development of both - and now it's available for you to download for your own use! Scroll to the bottom of this article to download the infographic right away, or read on to learn more about the differences between data visualization and data representation for market research. Data visualization crunches numbers Putting it simply, data visualization is the process of taking information and representing it graphically. Common in insights and market research reporting, data visualization makes it easier to communicate the story in the data. When one is looking at a complex, large and perhaps varied data set, data visualization can be a great choice to impart that data story in a way that can be quickly and easily understood. Data visualizations are developed programmatically; that means they are built through the use of software. Think Google Maps or complex GIS systems - they crunch large data sets through sometimes sophisticated algorithms to find trends and correlations in the data, producing interactive representations that allow one to communicate or understand data more easily. Common examples of data visualizations include heat maps, streamgraphs and word clouds. Download your own copy of our infographic, The Difference Between Data Visualization and Data Representation for Market Research, by filling out the form below to see more data visualization examples and how they are used. Data representations support data reporting Sometimes referred to as infographics, data representations can support almost any kind of data reporting. They allow one to drill down to and communicate the most important parts of a data story graphically. Data representations, unlike data visualizations, are human generated. Design software is employed to build them (like Adobe Creative Suite, Canva or Piktochart), but they require a professional to take an editorial role in deciding which data to include to tell the data story best. Infographics communicate information creatively and stylistically to engage and create memorable experiences. This makes data representation ideal for executive summaries or to highlight key data points that may not be as well communicated in a data table or chart. Some ways data representations are used are in timelines, hierarchical representations, flow charts and comparisons.           Want to know about data visualization? Listen to Ep. 14 of Stories of Market Research: The Insightrix Podcast - it's all about how to use them, best practices on how to build them and more. Always know which to use and when We’ve developed an infographic that will help you remember the differences and uses of both data visualizations and representations. This rich and engaging chart offers insights into how both visualizations are representations are used and why, as well as the most common forms of both. You can hold onto it to refer to later, or share it to help teach others about infographics and visualizations. Go ahead - put it on your wall and never be unsure which chart or graphic to use to tell your next data story! Fill out the form below to access your own copy of The Difference Between Data Representation and Data Visualization for Market Research infographic.   Want to access the entire infographic? Fill out the form below to receive an email to download your own PDF copy.   hbspt.forms.create({ portalId: "374811", formId: "ae9b4751-7c2e-41f9-bde5-07da17ec7a90" }); ...
 

Insightrix Holiday Spending 2019 has arrived! What is the Saskatchewan holiday shopping scene looking like for 2019? Did you know that this year, 93% of Saskatchewan residents plan to buy holiday gifts? And what’s more, 78% of those holiday shoppers expect to make at least some of their purchases online. The holiday shopping experience in Saskatchewan is as unique as the people who live here. So, we’ve developed a web report to let you know just how Saskatchewan shoppers plan to make their holiday purchases this year, how much they expect to spend and where they will be shopping. Whether you need to know because you’re a decision maker in the retail industry, whether you want to know because you like to keep an eye on what's happening in the Saskatchewan retail marketplace – or even if you’re just someone who is curious, Insightrix Holiday Spending 2019 has all the Saskatchewan-specific Christmas shopping statistics you'll want. What’s in Insightrix Holiday Spending 2019? Insightrix Holiday Spending 2019 has all of the up-to-date facts about the holiday retail experience in Saskatchewan. What’s more, it is deep on context, containing Saskatchewan holiday shopping intelligence that has been trending from 2015. Find out how just how many Saskatchewan residents expect to buy gifts during the 2019 holiday shopping season and how certain demographics will be spending. Learn about which proportions of residents expect to do their holiday shopping online in 2019 and who expects to do their shopping locally in brick-and-mortar stores. More than just that, you can discover how much residents expect to spend this year, what means of payment they will be using and how that compares to their holiday spending in previous years. Get an understanding of how discounts affect expected holiday shopping behaviour… and much more! You can access Insightrix Holiday Spending 2019 right here on the Insightrix website. hbspt.cta.load(374811, 'dfa7ed65-a26d-49d3-8eab-a45427eb22c7', {}); ...
 

Adding video responses to your research project can build on your insights story One of the qualitative tools our clients have recently requested more of lately has been the adoption of online video research (video surveys) to tap into consumer behaviours. Video surveys are a powerful tool to evoke customer feedback in a way that is simply unmatched by more traditional approaches than say...