Episode 6 – Market Research Online Communities Stories of Market Research: The Insightrix Podcast is back with a new episode – Market Research Online Communities. What’s it about? The latest episode of Stories of Market Research: The Insightrix Podcast is all about market research online communities - one of the most powerful tools currently available to corporate and market researchers. They are powerful because they allow for faster research timelines, smaller budgets and greater accessibility for both researchers and research participants alike. As this technology is still relatively new, many still have questions. How do market research online communities work? What kinds of research work best with the technology? What are they in the first place? We answer those questions and delve into the details with guest co-host, Insightrix Communities Account Manager Megan McDowell. Megan gives us the insider’s scoop on many of the best research applications for online communities. She also describes how they are used, what features online communities commonly possess and much more. The episode is also joined by Affinity Credit Union Member Insights Manager, Adam Thome, and Dylan Cody from the same organization. They share their experience and understanding of online communities in relation to a recent Affinity Credit Union brand video testing project that employed one. Their perspective on the benefits of online communities and how they were used is especially insightful. If you have questions about market research online communities, or want to know how you could employ one, this podcast episode will give you a great grounding in this powerful and exciting research technology. Bonus video content! Episode 6 of the Insightrix Podcast is accompanied by a bonus special bonus video. Megan McDowell provides an inside view of what an online community looks like. She also shows some of the features that are common to almost all online communities and points out some of the features that make the Insightrix Communities market research online community platform really stand out. You can check out that video, or videos from other Insightrix podcasts, on the Insightrix YouTube channel. Where can you find Stories of Market Research: The Insightrix Podcast? You can find this episode of Stories of Market Research: The Insightrix Podcast on the Insightrix Podcast Archive. You'll find previous episodes there as well. You can access and stream episodes of the podcast, or download them to listen to later (they are great way to pass the time on long flights or your commute). If you prefer listening on a podcast listening app, you can access Stories of Market Research: The Insightrix Podcast on most podcast players. These include iTunes, Stitcher, Google Music and many others.    Insightrix Communities can deliver powerful insights Insightrix Communities™ can provide you the research insights you need with relevant, easy-to-access participants at an affordable price. By applying Insightrix Communities software, your team can benefit from on-hand market research experts who will help see your project through from concept to completion. Or you can employ and brand your own DIY community! Insightrix provides the know-how to take organizations through each step of the community-building journey, from recruiting your first community member to engaging with them and promoting participation in your research activities, to developing insights as the research is completed.  ...
 

Opt-in communities help businesses target niche markets If you are trying to get to know your target market, market research is often your first stop to find out more. And surveys are an excellent way to achieve relevant information about your brand. Although survey engines are readily available, your target audience may not be as accessible as you need them to be. Brands know exactly how important it is to talk to their potential customers and get their feedback, but the opportunity to enlist research participants who are interested in giving their opinion can sometimes stop your innovation from moving forward. And the more niche the audience, the more expensive recruiting potential participants to weigh in on your product or service can be.  While the dog days of recruiting individuals to participate are far from over, market research online communities (MROCs) have helped alleviate the pressure of attracting targeted and engaged individuals to assist businesses by contributing to research on their areas of interest. What does that look like? Maybe you are a marketer of a brand or service and you want to know how it is performing with a specific demographic. Perhaps you want to know more about that demographic – say, millennial women aged 18 to 25 – who commute by bicycle to school/work in all seasons. With access to an MROC, brands can conduct primary research with members of their niche market – like those passionate, all-season bicycle commuters!  As a result, your online community becomes a more focused group of survey participants with a unique knowledge base you can tap into. What does that mean? All online communities are different – by size and by their profiling. While some online communities can recruit as large as 15,000 general population participants, other communities can be created to be heartier, such as 50 specifically targeted survey participants. But whether it is 15,000 people or 50 community members, all online communities provide powerful insights in a cost-effective way. In fact, smaller, engaged communities can be easily facilitated by research professionals or business owners - making for research on a much more personalized level at a fraction of the cost of a traditional ad hoc research project.    By employing online communities to create surveys, you can invest in customers/clients to understand their preferences better and to gather intelligence at any stage of development. Simply – it means getting constant feedback with relevant people.    Relevant participants Why speak with participants who are not relevant to your research project? By only selecting the most appropriate individuals to participate in the research, the data produced will be much more relevant to your business goals. A more focused group can facilitate research that produces actionable intelligence because the research is done with participants who have already bought in to the organization’s goals, and who demographically conform to research needs.   For example, if the desire is to survey those who bike to work everyday – it can be assumed the potential participants are a more defined group of the population than those who commute in other ways, like a personal vehicle. By zeroing in on the target participant group, you may get answers to questions that other, less-targeted participants may have no experience with (i.e., how often there is snow removal in bike lanes). Ease of access Because online communities can be set up ahead of time, and because survey participants have bought in, organizations can field as much research as they like, about whatever topic that is of interest to them, with a sample group that is ready to go right away. For example, if an organization wants to test specific winter tires for bicycles, or perhaps a series of advertisements involving bicycle winter safety, they can access their target group whenever they like and turn the research around at a much faster rate. Affordability Because target groups are enlisted from online recruitment, primary research can be done with an online community at a fraction of the cost of research projects that rely on the need to recruit qualified participants. And, as all participants are pre-screened to meet exact criteria (for example, those who commute to work on their bicycle in all seasons), and since the research is conducted online, many costs associated with custom research projects are eliminated. Think about travel costs, call centre costs (like telephone recruitment, etc.), participant incentives, focus group facility rentals and more. The turnaround One of the best reasons to employ an online community for your target group is undoubtedly the speed with which your research can be turned around. If you are burning the midnight oil and interested in tapping into the knowledge of your participants, you can do so at any given time. Most research questions are turned around in under 48 hours - it’s almost as if you have a research group in your back pocket, waiting to help make the decisions as quickly as possible.    Insightrix Communities can deliver powerful insights Insightrix Communities™ can provide you the research insights you need with relevant easy-to-access participants at an affordable price. Online community software is flexible - giving the capability to build short-term communities or more long-term, complex research projects. By applying Insightrix Communities software, your team can benefit from on-hand market research experts who can help see your project through from concept to completion – or employ and brand your own DIY community! Insightrix provides the know-how to take organizations through each step of the community-building journey, from recruiting your first community member to engaging with them and promoting participation in your research activities, to developing insights as the research is completed. If you want to learn more about how communities can help, listen to The Insightrix Podcast Episode 6: Market Research Online Communities by streaming here or from any major podcast app. ...
 

Insightrix recently ran an OnTopic survey to determine the state of philanthropy in Saskatchewan. Saskatchewan residents are a pretty charitable bunch, with 95% of Saskatchewan residents reporting they have donated money to a charitable organization at one point or another. Those charitable contributions add up – and the organizations Sask. residents are donating to and the amounts they are donating haven’t changed much over the last year. Where are they donating? When comes to the percentage of their charitable donations, residents still donate as much as they did last year to organizations in the field of healthcare – 40% this year and 40% in 2017. For those who report that they have donated to a charity, a similar story can be seen in donations to hospitals (36% in 2017 and 34% in 2018), pet shelters (32% in 2017 and 34% in 2018) and to food banks (41% in 2017 and 39% in 2018). The only real fluctuation occurs in donations to religious organizations, whose donations have increased from 34% of the monies donated by residents who donated to charities in 2017 to 41% in 2018. Where are they volunteering? In 2018, Saskatchewan volunteers participated in a wide range of activities, such as fundraising, event organizing, participating as a board member and many more activities. In fact, in the past 12 months, 55% of Saskatchewan residents participated in volunteer activities at some time or another. For some activities, volunteerism in Saskatchewan has increased to some degree. While 64% of Saskatchewan residents who volunteered engaged in fundraising activities in 2017, that number grew to 77% in 2018. A similar situation emerges when looking at organizing and coordinating (66% in 2017, 75% in the last 12 months) and maintenance volunteering (37% in 2017 and 51% in the last 12 months). Acting as a board or committee member, on the other hand, is something just as many Saskatchewan volunteers got up to in 2017 as they did in the past 12 months – 59% of Saskatchewan volunteers. Why did they do it? According to those who were involved in volunteering in Saskatchewan, for the most part, being a volunteer was something they benefited from. Beyond a feeling of having done something worthwhile, some volunteers stated they benefited physically through their activity – 55% of those who volunteered in the past 12 months said they feel healthier, and 77% stated it improved their mood. It wasn’t just physical benefits for volunteering, though. Of those who volunteered in the past 12 months, 40% stated they benefited through increased time management skills, and a whopping 74% said they now enjoy improved people and teamwork skills. Do you want to participate in fun and interesting research like this? You can! Register with SaskWatch Research® today and start participating right away. SaskWatch Research is Saskatchewan’s largest online research community, comprising over 18,000+ Saskatchewan residents. By becoming a SaskWatch member, you can weigh in on important issues in Saskatchewan, and have your voice heard on concerns relating brands and businesses. Learn More >>...
 

Market research is a powerful tool for advocacy In an internet age, not-for-profit organizations should understand how important it is to adopt market research as advocacy to help inform their public interest initiatives. Because not-for-profits are vital to the local communities they serve, it is their shared responsibility to encourage policy and law makers to do what is right for the public. By using advocacy market research, not-for-profits can adopt a robust tool to put their cases forward and reach change agents in all levels of government.   This is research for advocacy in a nutshell. In most funding circles, advocacy is often considered an “art of persuasion”; it can be loosely defined as “converting the impossible into the inevitable”. Ask any campaign manager and they will tell you the same. The question is: How do campaign managers convert the impossible and reach the public to create more awareness and become relevant to policymakers?   Research for advocacy When we think of research for advocacy, some may think of decades of long, drawn-out research studies that show obscure connections between lifestyle and behaviour factors. And while some industry research can take many years to yield actionable results, research for advocacy can often be done MORE QUICKLY and can deliver information that is sometimes more relevant to policymakers. One way to get an advocacy message in front of the public is by undertaking and publicizing research that demonstrates the need for such laws or policies, the public support behind them and the likely results if the change were implemented. For example, as part of Tourism Saskatoon’s strategic plan, they identified the need to expand hosting capacity and to remain competitive for business and sporting events. For the past several years, the city of Saskatoon has seen on and off support for a new downtown arena and convention centre. Because Tourism Saskatoon ran a public opinion poll conducted by Insightrix to promote their advocacy message, they received media coverage to help grow support and validate their city planning initiatives. Insightrix worked with the Tourism Saskatoon on the question wording to ensure that the answers represented the views of the community, and were not leading, thereby ensuring credibility. This is an example of publicizing research that demonstrates the direct interest of the community. https://globalnews.ca/news/4101828/downtown-arena-tourism-saskatoon/ (media coverage) http://www.tourismsaskatoon.com/about/about-strategic-plan/ (strategic plan) What distinguishes research for advocacy from other types of evidence-based research is that it is focused on specific answers in mind, and that it is a part of an overarching strategy to influence potential policy development and policy change. While other research can contribute to the overall understanding of an issue, market research for advocacy has a narrow and specific aim, and it does not have to take a lot of time or money to be effective for advocacy campaigns.    Think like an NGO and run an Omnibus Poll Most NGOs conduct research in-house, but can use market research firms to help with validating or creating evidence for the larger research projects undertaken by these organizations. NGOs often use market research to “top up” their existing research by employing omnibus surveys and using locally-conducted research. Omnibus surveys often make good news, particularly if your research is interesting and shows potential for strong public support for the initiative at hand. Not-for-profits should monitor how NGOs conduct omnibus polling – as these kinds of research methodologies can be done easily and are inexpensive to conduct. At Insightrix, we run a monthly omnibus poll. Omnibus surveys are a quick and cost-effective, potent research tool that doesn’t break the bank. Our monthly omnibus sample is random and representative: we set quotas by region, age and gender to ensure the sample matches the distribution of the populations. When thinking about conducting an omnibus survey – keep two things in mind: your story should be newsworthy and contain something interesting that will catch people’s attention (or the attention of journalists), and it should also incorporate the advocacy message. Many NGOs have created media partnerships that have proven to be fruitful. With the internet becoming an important tool to promote timely research, low-cost media advocacy is an inexpensive way to increase your initiative’s chances for success, especially when it becomes news.   Getting an “in” with the media Using the media to get your advocacy research in front of the public is an effective way to secure better policies on a range of issues.  Cultivating relationships with journalists and local media can be difficult – that is, until you get your in with them. Media professionals are often on the look out for good ideas to write about for an article or to produce a segment for broadcast, and they pay close attention to press releases they receive. However, your press or media release itself is not the objective of advocacy; it is the effect of the news coverage that is important, and that may not always be easy to measure. One of the best ways to get your in with the media is to be analytical in your own observations of the media and their interactions with those you’re trying to reach. Attempt to understand what type of news is considered newsworthy - What appeals to readers? What issues gain little attention and which gain a lot? Are there local journalists who are more interested in social issues than others? Through your own research, you can see what gets covered in the media and how that information is presented. Doing this will create advocacy research that is desirable to media, that will be easier to digest and that will more than likely land you publicity for your initiative.   Use omnibus research to spur your advocacy efforts Media and research are two extremely valuable tools that can increase the awareness of your advocacy research and often require few resources other than the time and people to see them through. By using more advocacy to validate long-term research, by strengthening your relationship with the media (thereby building the understanding of the population), it will be much easier to influence the policies that matter to them most over time.  ...
 

You could be doing research for your small business Getting the chance to ask research questions for your business is often thought to be beyond the ability of most small and medium-sized businesses (SMB). Market research, while desperately needed for SMB, can be considered a lower priority when determining what an SMB should or should not spend money. With the constant need to probe, learn and collect intelligence for businesses – in an economy where everyone is trying to market their product effectively – research should not be the first budget item on the chopping block. Especially when market research companies offer cost-saving alternatives to custom research projects like omnibus research. Not only is market research a necessity for all levels and types of business – it could also save further investment down the road and have a major impact on the brand. Getting actionable insights from asking the right research questions can be both affordable and accessible to all businesses who need a pulse check.  The question is, what are some best practices to employ to create good research questions that yield actionable results? Actionable market research needs to start out right It isn’t always easy to find the right place to start a market research project. It may be there are many ideas for research that come to mind. But a good place to get rolling is to decide the exact research questions you would like to have answers for. Market research isn’t always about uncovering the hidden insights that you never knew before you started – it is also to help clarify or validate what you already knew.     Think about it this way… As an SMB, start by asking, “What kind of market intelligence is it that I want or need for my business?” or “What evidence am I after to clarify my business or marketing strategy?” Let’s say you are a business developer or a marketing specialist for a tech company. You are ready to start concept testing on a new feature of the product but do not know if your customers are interested or ready in such a feature. You may rely on your general understanding of how the product works to prepare the lot of questions in ways that make sense to you - but will that yield actionable results? You may come up with questions like… -or- But take a minute. Are these questions going to yield actionable results for the business or marketing strategy?   Think about the answers when reading the question; will it help you define if your customers like the new feature(s)? Sure. Will it help determine if the new feature is right for your customers? Perhaps not. Questions, questions… Formulating questions that need to be answered, based on the research topic, is a problem waiting to be solved. As an insights agency, we encourage our clients to deliver us their questions monthly to be included in our omnibus. And our omnibus functions as a lean research tool for businesses that need quick results. Whether it is pre-determined market intelligence that requires questions developed to explore, or if you already have research questions that need answering, our consultants can help in the formulation and fielding of omnibus research that will yield relevant and actionable information.  But before you contact your market research provider, we’ve provided some hints you can use when coming up with your own research questions. Ask research questions that can be answered. Before starting to try to answer a question, it must first be determined whether there is the time or resources available to conduct the research in the first place. Let’s go back to our first example… Finding out which age groups engage with your product or what your customers want from the new features are questions that can be easily answered! But determining the factors of influence that led your customers to be interested in your product in the first place may not be (with this level of research, at least!). Ask one question at a time. Compound questions should be avoided. Asking questions around “if they use your product” and “at what times” may seem like a good place to start the survey, but asking questions like these at the same time or all at once will result in answers that are confusing and uninformative. It is always better to ask single, succinct questions to avoid confusing your customers. Review the research questions thoroughly. Before consulting your research provider, make sure to investigate with your developers to know how your product works, and with sales managers to know its selling points. While you consult your pros, you will still need to develop your own perspective that will help validate the need for your questions.   Be straightforward. If your responding customers do not know what the research question is asking, the response given won’t be of any use to inform the insights gathered at the end of research. Avoid the use of confusing words or language – keep questions as simple and as short as possible, and try to be specific about what it is that is being asked. Avoid research questions like, “Do you like to eat a lot?” Instead, stick to questions like, “At what times of day do you usually eat?” Being specific like this will lead to less confusion for customers, providing actionable market intelligence that relates directly to the research at hand. Provide restrictive and extensive response options. When setting up multiple choice research questions, be sure to make choices exhaustive (they cover all possible choices to the question asked) and restrictive (one answer cannot be mistaken for another by the respondent). In a question like, “What is your annual net income after taxes?”, an example of a restrictive and extensive series of responses could be: In a series of responses like this, virtually all possible options are covered and none of the answer categories can be said to overlap with the others. Setting up research questions so they are restrictive and extensive will not only provide a wide range of detailed data to work with, it will avoid biasing, or presupposing the answers respondents will provide before they are asked. Give your respondents an out. Some respondents may not feel comfortable answering all research questions. If inquiring about demographic information like household income, gender, etc., or looking to gather other sensitive information, it is often a good idea to provide a “Prefer not to answer” option to respondents. Giving responding customers an opportunity to opt out of questions will keep more of them answering (instead of dropping out entirely) and will limit them giving inaccurate responses only to proceed in the survey (resulting in unreliable data). On top of this, the number of those who preferred not to answer questions is still valuable data that can used in finding insight into the research topic. Balance the scale of available responses. Think long and hard about the scale upon which responding customers will answer survey questions. Points on scales should be equally distant from one another in concept or number from one another. Meaning - always avoid response scales that do not measure the same thing. If the question were to be asked, “How would you rate your experience with my company’s product?”, it doesn’t make sense to ask customers to rate their experience on a scale of 1 – Excellent. The first response is a number; the second is a feeling. Both are much different in concept, and using them both in the same scale would not just confuse responding customers, but it would also confuse the data gathered from their responses. If the research question requires a scaled response, stick to easy-to-use scales of one to ten, or scales that involve concepts that are very easily understood at first reading. Pitch your questions to a market research firm for consultation.  Now that you know what you want to research, and you have some great research questions ready to ask, it never hurts to call in a pro to validate the direction and scope of the research before committing to the investment of time and resources to the project. Market research firms like Insightrix are experts in their field and are both accessible and affordable to all levels of business. Whether to validate a specific project, or to inform a project from its beginning, engaging a market research firm at the outset for a consultation will result in more focused research (saving your business both time and money), and will provide more actionable data when the research is done.  What's more, when you access the experience of a market research firm, you'll be sure your research project is overseen by a third party, ensuring the project design and the data it produces are free from any bias - either real or imagined by others.  Doing good research is within reach Creating market research, formulating research topics, deciding on methodologies, crafting the perfect research questions, etc. can all be heavy lifting at first, but if you stick to the tips above, the process can be made much less arduous. Do you have a question or an idea for a research topic for your business? Insightrix OnTopic omnibus surveys allow any size or type of business to ask a research question affordably. Using either the SaskWatch or ManitobaWatch online research panels, the OnTopic service can ask your question or questions for you and provide you the intelligence your business needs at a fraction of the cost of undertaking a research project yourself – and benefit from the insight and survey design experience of seasoned pros. ...
 

  Trended data specific to Saskatchewan Since 2016, Insightrix has been tracking the use of social media by Saskatchewan residents and their social lives online to understand how they engage with one another and with brands and businesses, and to find out their preferences and the ways they use the platforms themselves. When the Saskatchewan Social Media Report (2016) was published – it was presented at workshops and conferences across Western Canada, and more than 200 marketers, business consultants, policy makers and advertisers downloaded the report or benefited from its insight. Many of those who accessed the report say they have used it to validate their marketing initiatives, and as a valuable tool for planning and strategizing.   For the first time, it was possible examine the ways Saskatchewan consumers (aged fourteen years old and older) interact with social media over mobile technologies and the internet, their attitudes toward social networks and their behaviours while using them - and what their preferences might be in the future. And even more important, it became possible to compare those statistics with trended data specific to Saskatchewan social media users. A useful narrative that you can understand  Now, those with interests in the province are able to examine Saskatchewan-specific usage data that have been trended over time and make comparisons to the historical story.  The value of this trended data is obvious when comparing Saskatchewan-specific social media usage data over time. In Saskatchewan, social media use has clearly increased since 2015. Back then, 83% of Saskatchewan residents said they used social networking sites - now, that number has increased to 90% of the people in the province over the age of 14! With evidence like this, it doesn’t take a genius to see that untrended data do not give the whole picture when it comes to social media usage statistics. New to the 2018 Saskatchewan Social Media Report The 2018 Saskatchewan Social Media Report has been slimmed down in terms of raw data and beefed up with digestible and thoughtful insight - and it's been repriced to be accessible to all levels of business in Saskatchewan. Dive into this rich, trended data and actionable insight to learn how the Saskatchewan digital landscape has changed over the years with visualized reporting and a clear narrative that you can understand and use right away. The 2018 Saskatchewan Social Media Report has also added a local chapter dedicated to Saskatchewan brands and how Saskatchewan social media users engage with them. Use the report to find out why residents are following local brands, which industries they are engaged in and what they are looking for in terms of advertisement and brand engagement.  ...
 

Corrin will be presenting a recent study by Insightrix that profiled the non-profit sector in Saskatchewan on behalf of the Saskatchewan Nonprofit Partnership – the first ever of its kind.   The study that will be discussed provided a richly detailed profile of the non-profit sector, identified top challenges in the sector and examined finance and grant application efforts while providing an idea of the differences (and similarities) of the research requirements that exist in both the for-profit and non-profit sectors. The presentation will be held at 6:00 PM at the University of Regina – Administration Humanities Bldg, in the AH 527 Boardroom. For more information, check out the Data for Good Regina website.   Data for Good Data for Good is a Canadian organization that gives back by volunteering their data science expertise to help non-profits and not-for-profits. They organize statisticians and analysts, marketers and market researchers and developers and data scientists of all kinds to lend their data acumen to help out by providing services like sector profiling, employee engagement studies, data gathering, data cleaning and interpretation, website and dashboard construction and a host of other necessary functions. They regularly host meetups, presentations and datathons presented by their regional chapters.  If you’d like to learn more about this organization and how Insightrix is involved, check out the Data for Good episode of Stories of Market Research: The Insightrix Podcast, where we speak to co-founders Joy Robson and Jeff Zakaib to get the scoop on how the movement of volunteering in data science is helping non-profits, not-for-profits and NGOs in Canada.    ...
 

Seven in ten social media users in Saskatchewan have witnessed racial/ethnic bigotry on social media. In a new independent poll conducted by Insightrix Research Inc., Saskatchewan residents were asked how social media has impacted their lives. Sixty percent (60%) of Saskatchewan social media users indicated it had both a positive and negative impact on their lives. Another 14% felt it didn’t change their lives, 11% indicated it had positively impacted their lives, 6% indicated it had negatively impacted their lives, 4% said they never use social media, 2% were unsure and 3% have quit using social media altogether. Despite indicating social media has had some positive impact on their lives, more than one third (34%) feel the behaviour of others on social media has negatively impacted their lives. In fact, 59% of Saskatchewan social media users feel social media has led them to have a more negative view of society. Another 22% indicate it has had no impact on how they view society while only 7% thought it has led to a more positive view of society. Another 12% indicate they are not sure.  In what way has social media changed the way you view society as a whole? (% of SK Social Media Users) Men (65%), compared to women (53%), are more likely to indicate social media has led them to have a more negative view of society, as are those aged 18 to 34  (64%) and 35 to 54 (63%). Older Saskatchewan social media users aged 55 or older were more likely to indicate social media has no impact on how they view society (30%). Witnessing Online Harassment These negative perceptions are likely influenced by having witnessed someone being harassed on social media. Overall, more than half (55%) of Saskatchewan social media users indicate they have seen someone, other than themselves, harassed on social media. This number is higher among those aged 18 to 34 years old (76%) and 35 to 54 years old (59%). When asked what types of harassment they have witnessed others experience on social media, more than two thirds (70%) report witnessing racial harassment, 59% report harassment based on political affiliation, 59% report sexist/gender-based harassment, 57% report body shaming, 56% report religious intolerance, 55% report threats or intimidation and more than one half (51%) report witnessing homophobic/sexuality-based harassment on social media.* What forms of harassment have you witnessed  while you have been on social media? (% of SK Social Media Users) Those Saskatchewan social media users aged 18-34 years old are more likely to report having witnessed revenge porn (15%), harassment of disabled persons (40%), impersonation/catfishing (36%) and sexist/gender-based harassment (68%). Those with children in the household are more likely to indicate they have witnessed threats and intimidation (61%) on social media. Victims of Harassment Two in ten (21%) Saskatchewan social media users report having once been a victim of harassment on social media. Those aged 18 to 34 years old (36%) and those of indigenous ancestry (32%) are more likely to indicate they have been a victim of harassment on social media.  When asked what types of harassment they have experienced, 47% of Saskatchewan social media users indicate threats and intimidation, 34% indicate body shaming, 28% indicate sexist/gender-based harassment and 24% indicate harassment based on political affiliation.* *Respondents were given the option to make multiple selections; therefore, percentages total more than 100%. Potential for Discontinuation The negative impact of social media appears to be taking a toll on Saskatchewan social media users, with one third (34%) indicating harassment on social media has made them at one time want to discontinue the use of one or more forms of social media altogether. Another 9% of Saskatchewan users indicate they have already discontinued at least one form, and 57% indicate they do not plan discontinue. Research Details A total of 804 randomly selected SaskWatch Research® panel members participated in the online research study between February 5 to February 8, 2018. Quotas were set by age, gender and region to match the general population of the province; therefore, the data did not need to be weighted.  Since the research is conducted online, it is considered to be a non-probability proportion sample; therefore, margins of error are not applicable. However, the margin of error can be estimated to be ±3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20 for questions answered by all respondents (n=804). Detailed information on this release is available upon request.  About SaskWatch Research® Insightrix began developing its SaskWatch Research online market research panel in October 2007, using high quality techniques including telephone recruitment and referrals from existing panel members. Presently, there are over 18,000 active panel members representing all regions of the province and distributions of the general population. Panel membership closely matches the 2016 Census, based on age, gender, household composition, household income and education. For more information, please visit http://saskwatch.ca.  ...
 

Customer experience programs are not a new concept It has been pretty much established that in any line of business, while your product or service may be what gets them in the door, what keeps your customers coming back again and again is the experience.  The customer experience landscape has shifted the way all B2C organizations manage their brand. This can include impeccable front-line customer service, ease of navigating your facilities (or digital assets), the user design of those facilities, etc. - and how that all ultimately ties back into your customer journey.  In fact, customer experience is not only the responsibility of one business area; it's something that should be managed across all levels of business.  In the beginning… Weirdly enough, customer experience measurement (or management programs) have existed in many forms over the years. From the first bazaar merchant who asked a customer if they could do better, to customer comment cards and the old school variant - the customer satisfaction survey - most of these older methodologies revolved almost exclusively around identifying customer touchpoints, or moments of contact between the business and the customer before and after their purchase. But, focusing almost entirely on increasing satisfaction at these points is a slippery slope, as it can lead to a distortion effect – data like this can lead companies to believe their customers are happier with the company than they really are.    It also takes emphasis away from the customer’s actual journey with the company, and magnifies the need to act on specific touchpoints.   For example, if your customer service representative asked one of your customers during a service call how satisfied she or he was with their interaction on a Likert Scale, the number your company would get back may not accurately represent the reality of the interaction. Say the customer gave a rating of 3 out of a possible 7 – was this dissatisfaction due to the interaction the customer had with the customer service representative? Or was the frustration due to waiting too long to talk to that representative, or was the hold music not to her or his liking, or was there something else entirely that led to the customer’s dissatisfaction? In these older customer satisfaction methodologies, who knows? There just isn’t enough qualitative data to find out what led the customer to be dissatisfied – the company just knows something is wrong. Today’s customer experience measurement programs go beyond simple quantitative assessment and look to develop answers to WHY the customer is satisfied or dissatisfied. This gives a much more holistic view of what’s actually going on in these customer interactions.   Rather than trying to make sense of numbers with no meaning, today’s CX methodologies allow organizations to worry more about managing the store than managing their score.   In other words, customer experience programs allows businesses to become more customer-centric as a whole. In fact, on a recent episode of Stories of Market Research: The Insightrix Podcast we interviewed Voice of Customer consultant, John Morton, to dig into the most common and critical issues many organizations have encountered in managing their customer journey, as well as some of the customer experience best practices successful companies share.  Identify stakeholders, not just shareholders… Building a customer-centric organization is about building relationships – and building relationships is done by showing customers you are listening.  Creating a customer-centric organization involves talking to stakeholders – those people, like your customers, who rely on the company, and not just its c-suite executives and board members.   This is why employee engagement surveys are one of the crucial elements in any CX program.   To get to the bottom of a customer’s journey, you must involve front-line staff who are a major part of that journey. It’s the front-line staff of the company who are in the closest relationship with the customer. Therefore, their input to the process isn’t just important, it is critical. Without direct lines of communication between the front-line and the boardroom, divisions and disconnects across business silos occur – often resulting in a less than optimal customer experience. According to the Harvard Business Review, “Even if a fix appears obvious from the outside, the root causes of poor customer experience always stem from the inside, often from cross-functional disconnects. Only by getting cross-functional teams together to see problems for themselves and design solutions as a group can companies hope to make fixes that stick.” Customer experience programs tie the front-line and the boardroom together, creating an organization that not only understands the touch points in their customer’s journey, but also understands what’s happening in the organization on the ground level and all other points along that customer’s journey, before, during and after purchase.   Go beyond customer service and extend to all levels and all areas of a business and focus on creating customer relationships, not just sales.   Address not just the shareholders of a company, but also that company’s stakeholders – bridge the gap between the boardroom and the point of sale. Ultimately, CX programs address your customer’s entire journey with the company, resulting in someone who is willing to come back, again and again… and again. Do you want to know more about customer experience programs? You can download this whitepaper – it describes the Insightrix Customer-Centric Experience Program (Insightrix CX). ...
 

Winter in Winnipeg is no joke. You don’t earn the nickname, Winterpeg, for nothing after all. Around this time of year, it’s not uncommon to hear friends and family complain about the winter taking a toll both physically and mentally. To combat these winter blahs, many cities and their residents work hard to create a positive winter culture. Insightrix wanted to know how the City of Winnipeg and its residents created a winter culture all their own - like how do they spend their time outdoors during the winter, how cold is just too darned cold and what else could be done to promote a positive winter culture in Winnipeg. We surveyed 360 residents of Winnipeg between February 12 and 15 using ManitobaWatch®  - the Insightrix online research panel in Manitoba. ManitobaWatch sample quotas are set by age, gender and region to match the general population of the province, and since the research is conducted online, it is considered to be a non-probability proportion sample. Therefore, margins of error are not applicable. This is what we learned...