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Customer experience programs are not a new concept It has been pretty much established that in any line of business, while your product or service may be what gets them in the door, what keeps your customers coming back again and again is the experience.  The customer experience landscape has shifted the way all B2C organizations manage their brand. This can include impeccable front-line customer service, ease of navigating your facilities (or digital assets), the user design of those facilities, etc. - and how that all ultimately ties back into your customer journey.  In fact, customer experience is not only the responsibility of one business area; it's something that should be managed across all levels of business.  In the beginning… Weirdly enough, customer experience measurement (or management programs) have existed in many forms over the years. From the first bazaar merchant who asked a customer if they could do better, to customer comment cards and the old school variant - the customer satisfaction survey - most of these older methodologies revolved almost exclusively around identifying customer touchpoints, or moments of contact between the business and the customer before and after their purchase. But, focusing almost entirely on increasing satisfaction at these points is a slippery slope, as it can lead to a distortion effect – data like this can lead companies to believe their customers are happier with the company than they really are.    It also takes emphasis away from the customer’s actual journey with the company, and magnifies the need to act on specific touchpoints.   For example, if your customer service representative asked one of your customers during a service call how satisfied she or he was with their interaction on a Likert Scale, the number your company would get back may not accurately represent the reality of the interaction. Say the customer gave a rating of 3 out of a possible 7 – was this dissatisfaction due to the interaction the customer had with the customer service representative? Or was the frustration due to waiting too long to talk to that representative, or was the hold music not to her or his liking, or was there something else entirely that led to the customer’s dissatisfaction? In these older customer satisfaction methodologies, who knows? There just isn’t enough qualitative data to find out what led the customer to be dissatisfied – the company just knows something is wrong. Today’s customer experience measurement programs go beyond simple quantitative assessment and look to develop answers to WHY the customer is satisfied or dissatisfied. This gives a much more holistic view of what’s actually going on in these customer interactions.   Rather than trying to make sense of numbers with no meaning, today’s CX methodologies allow organizations to worry more about managing the store than managing their score.   In other words, customer experience programs allows businesses to become more customer-centric as a whole. In fact, on a recent episode of Stories of Market Research: The Insightrix Podcast we interviewed Voice of Customer consultant, John Morton, to dig into the most common and critical issues many organizations have encountered in managing their customer journey, as well as some of the customer experience best practices successful companies share.  Identify stakeholders, not just shareholders… Building a customer-centric organization is about building relationships – and building relationships is done by showing customers you are listening.  Creating a customer-centric organization involves talking to stakeholders – those people, like your customers, who rely on the company, and not just its c-suite executives and board members.   This is why employee engagement surveys are one of the crucial elements in any CX program.   To get to the bottom of a customer’s journey, you must involve front-line staff who are a major part of that journey. It’s the front-line staff of the company who are in the closest relationship with the customer. Therefore, their input to the process isn’t just important, it is critical. Without direct lines of communication between the front-line and the boardroom, divisions and disconnects across business silos occur – often resulting in a less than optimal customer experience. According to the Harvard Business Review, “Even if a fix appears obvious from the outside, the root causes of poor customer experience always stem from the inside, often from cross-functional disconnects. Only by getting cross-functional teams together to see problems for themselves and design solutions as a group can companies hope to make fixes that stick.” Customer experience programs tie the front-line and the boardroom together, creating an organization that not only understands the touch points in their customer’s journey, but also understands what’s happening in the organization on the ground level and all other points along that customer’s journey, before, during and after purchase.   Go beyond customer service and extend to all levels and all areas of a business and focus on creating customer relationships, not just sales.   Address not just the shareholders of a company, but also that company’s stakeholders – bridge the gap between the boardroom and the point of sale. Ultimately, CX programs address your customer’s entire journey with the company, resulting in someone who is willing to come back, again and again… and again. Do you want to know more about customer experience programs? You can download this whitepaper – it describes the Insightrix Customer-Centric Experience Program (Insightrix CX). ...
 

Winter in Winnipeg is no joke. You don’t earn the nickname, Winterpeg, for nothing after all. Around this time of year, it’s not uncommon to hear friends and family complain about the winter taking a toll both physically and mentally. To combat these winter blahs, many cities and their residents work hard to create a positive winter culture. Insightrix wanted to know how the City of Winnipeg and its residents created a winter culture all their own - like how do they spend their time outdoors during the winter, how cold is just too darned cold and what else could be done to promote a positive winter culture in Winnipeg. We surveyed 360 residents of Winnipeg between February 12 and 15 using ManitobaWatch®  - the Insightrix online research panel in Manitoba. ManitobaWatch sample quotas are set by age, gender and region to match the general population of the province, and since the research is conducted online, it is considered to be a non-probability proportion sample. Therefore, margins of error are not applicable. This is what we learned...
 

Ad testing isn’t a thing of the past It seems like every time forward-thinking marketers bring up ad testing these days, they are dismissed by their older, set-in-their-ways colleagues.  Concerns of cost and timeliness, as well as the idea that ad testing (in nebulously described ways) diminishes the creativity of your advertising efforts are usually at the root of criticism of the practice. While it may have been true at one point – before strides in technology and methodologies were made – practical application has lifted the practice of ad testing out of focus group rooms of the nineties and back into common practice for forward-thinking marketers. This is because ad testing has evolved. While today’s innovating front-line marketers are fixated on the metrics to help justify their advertisement choices, their executives and stakeholders simply want results. Marketers believe ad results should be inherently data driven, but businesses are starting to see the need for their brands to be more daring and better represented in the media, so the expectation is much bigger than a marketer’s projected ROI.   New quantitative techniques and methodologies have been developed to create faster, more credible and more actionable quantitative testing protocols and to build and access deeper, more robust norms - making those criticisms mentioned earlier more than a little invalid and out of date. But is advertisement research really worth the effort? The short answer is...
 

***UPDATE*** The final three members of the Insightrix 10 have found forever homes! As of February 1, the final member of the group, Darlene, was adopted - meaning that all of the kitties Insightrix sponsored over the holidays have found homes. We at Insightrix would like to thank not only those who took these cats home, but also all of those who liked, shared and retweeted our messages to help get them adopted.  Operation Cat Adoption has been a success – but three feline friends still need a forever home. Over the holidays, because our animal friends are often forgotten around this time of year, Insightrix sponsored 10 cats from the Saskatoon SPCA – paying their adoption fees for whomever could give them a home for the holidays. We’d like to give a short update on how those cats are doing. We’re very happy to say that seven of the cats we’ve come to affectionately call “The Insightrix 10” have already been saved from the big house, and are now happy in their new adopted homes. Thank you to all of the people who gave these cats a home. One of the cats, Darlene, has fallen under the weather over the holidays and is recuperating at the Saskatoon SPCA Animal Care Centre. She should make a complete recovery, though, and will be available to adopt soon. Stay tuned to Saskatoon SPCA and Insightrix social media for updates on her condition. The two remaining members of The Insightrix Ten are still at large and are still looking for a forever home. Both Chestnut and Rachel are currently waiting at the Stonegate Petland in Saskatoon, SK for a new friend to help them by bringing them home. Through Insightrix sponsorship, the adoption fees for these cats have been prepaid and they are ready to take home. If you could welcome one or both of these fine feline fellows into your home, or know someone who could provide a safe and stable forever home, please head to the Stonegate Petland in Saskatoon and take them home. You know they would appreciate it, and you’ll gain a friend for life. Insightrix would like to again thank the Saskatoon SPCA for making this possible, and for their continued work here in Saskatoon, as well as all SPCA locations, for the great work they are doing. If you’d like to contact the Stonegate Petland for more information or to arrange adoption, please call them at (306)934-3920....
 

Most Manitoba residents (88%) intend to buy gifts during the 2017 holiday shopping season.   FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: December 21, 2017   In a recent independent poll by Insightrix Research Inc., 88% of Manitoba residents reported they intend to purchase gifts this holiday season. During this holiday season, 90% of women polled state they intend to purchase gifts, as do 87% of men. Ninety-seven percent (97%) of Manitobans with one or more children stated they intend to purchase gifts this holiday season, as do 82% of those polled with no children.   When will Manitobans be doing most of their holiday shopping?   When it comes to when Manitobans intend to do most of their holiday shopping, almost half (47%) of those polled stated they had already completed their shopping. Almost 2 in 10 (19%) state they plan on doing their shopping between December 16-20, while 13% plan on getting it done by the middle of the month (December 1-15). More than one in ten (11%) of those polled plan on putting it off until the last minute, doing their shopping in the last week before Christmas, and 7% state they plan on doing their holiday shopping after Christmas, during Boxing Week. Another 4% said they were unsure when they’d do their holiday shopping. How much will Manitobans spend over the holidays? When asked how much they plan on spending over the holiday season compared to last year, almost half (49%) of those polled report they plan on spending about the same amount as last year. One quarter (25%) state they plan on spending less than last year, and more than one quarter (27%) state they plan on spending more. How will they pay for it all?   How Manitobans plan on paying for their holiday purchases was another question we asked. A larger proportion of those polled (50%) reported they plan on making their holiday purchases with a major credit card, and almost four in ten (37%) state they will be relying on cash put aside specifically to pay for holiday shopping. Two in ten (20%) of those we polled state they plan on using discretionary income to shop over the holidays, while 16% report they will dip into their savings. Nearly 1 in 10 (8%) state they plan on delaying payment of bills, and another 8% plan on using gift cards. Seven percent (7%) of polled residents state they intend to use a store credit card, and 4% will be relying on other means to make their holiday purchases. *Note that respondents could have provided more than one response which is why the following numbers add to more than 100%. Research Details A total of 603 randomly selected Manitoba Watch Research® panel members participated in the online research study on December 12 through December 14, 2017. Quotas were set by age, gender and region to match the general population of the province. Since the research is conducted online, it is considered to be a non-probability proportion sample; therefore, margins of error are not applicable. About Insightrix Founded in 2001, Insightrix Research Inc. is a full-service market research firm that helps clients develop, administer, and manage data collection and information strategies. From its office in Saskatoon, Insightrix offers a comprehensive range of research services. For more information, please visit our website. For more information, please contact: Duncan McGregor, Marketing & Communications Coordinator Insightrix Research Inc. Tel: 306.657.5640 ext. 240...
 

Most Saskatchewan residents (93%) intend to buy gifts during the 2017 holiday shopping season. FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: December 21, 2017   In a recent independent poll by Insightrix Research Inc., 93% of Saskatchewan residents reported they intend to purchase gifts this holiday season. During this holiday season, 95% of women polled state they intend to purchase gifts, as do 90% of men. Ninety-five percent (95%) of residents between the age of 35-54 years state they intend to buy gifts, while a lower number (89%) of those over the age of 55 years report the same.   When will Sask. residents be doing most of their holiday shopping?   When it comes to when residents of Saskatchewan intend to do most of their holiday shopping, half the respondents (50%) had already purchased most of their gifts, and other 14% planned to do by middle of December (1st to the 15th). Almost a quarter (22%) plan to purchase most of their gifts in the latter half of December (16th to 20th) and 10% plan to do so in the last few days before Christmas (21st to 24th). Another 2% of residents plan to purchase most of their gifts during boxing week and 2% were not sure when they would get most of their gifts.   How much will residents spend over the holidays? When asked how much they plan on spending over the holiday season compared to last year, more than half (56%) of those polled report they plan on spending about the same amount as last year. Almost one quarter (24%) state they plan on spending less than last year, and two in ten (20%) state they plan on spending more. How will they pay for it all?   How Saskatchewan residents plan on paying for their holiday purchases was another question we asked. A larger proportion of those polled (46%) reported they plan on making their holiday purchases with a major credit card, and almost four in ten (37%) state they will be relying on cash put aside specifically to pay for holiday shopping. Nearly one quarter (24%) of those we polled state they plan on using discretionary income to shop over the holidays, while 17% report they will dip into their savings. Nearly 1 in 10 (8%) state they plan on delaying payment of bills, and 4% plan on using gift cards. Three percent (3%) of polled residents state they intend to use a store credit card, and 7% will be relying on other means to make their holiday purchases. *Note that respondents could have provided more than one response which is why the following numbers add to more than 100%. Research Details A total of 801 randomly selected SaskWatch Research® panel members participated in the online research study on December 12 through December 14, 2017. Quotas were set by age, gender and region to match the general population of the province. Since the research is conducted online, it is considered to be a non-probability proportion sample: therefore, margins of error are not applicable.  About SaskWatch Research Insightrix began developing its SaskWatch Research® online market research panel in October 2007, using high quality techniques, including telephone recruitment and referrals from existing panel members. Presently, there are over 15,500 active panel members representing all regions of the province and distributions of the general population. The panel membership closely matches the 2011 Census based on age, gender, household composition, household income and education. For more information, please visit SaskWatch.ca.  About Insightrix Insightrix is a dynamic, Western Canadian, full-service market research company. It exists to serve businesses and government entities with insights-driven research solutions, and interpretive analysis through leading-edge tools and senior-level expertise across a broad range of industries. Insightrix is based in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. For more information, please visit our website. For more information, please contact Duncan McGregor, Marketing & Communications Coordinator Insightrix Research Inc. Tel: 306.657.5640 ext. 240...
 

In November, Insightrix and SaskWatch partnered on a campaign for SaskWatch members – giving residents of Saskatchewan the chance to win free groceries up to $1,000 to use at the grocery store of their choice while at the same time having a donation of $1,000 made to their local food bank. Through the month of November, SaskWatch members liked, shared and promoted the campaign and we are happy to announce the winners! Congratulations to Keith, our Grand Prize finalist! The promotion’s lucky winner was chosen on December 1st and Keith B. from Saskatoon won NOT ONLY $1,000 worth of groceries for himself, but also won the chance to donate another $1,000 to his local food bank! On December 8, Insightrix was thrilled to have the opportunity to drop off Keith’s $1,000 donation to the Saskatoon Food Bank & Learning Centre.   The Saskatoon Food Bank and Learning Centre Executive Director, Laurie O’Connor, was delighted to receive the donation and made sure to pass on her thanks, not just to Keith, the Grand Prize winner, but to everyone who participated. Give back to charities with SaskWatch points! Even though the Free Groceries promotion has finished, SaskWatch members are still giving back to charities all over Saskatchewan! For every survey completed as a member of the SaskWatch community, members can donate their earnings to the over 75 charities listed on the site. Not only do SaskWatch members donate a sizeable share to these charities, most of those charities were recommended by community members themselves....
 

Black Friday is here again - and Saskatchewan is ready for some sales. It used to be that Black Friday was an Americans-only event, with Canadians only able to get in on the deals by crossing the border and shopping in the United States. In the last decade or so, the shopping event has spread to Canadian retailers hoping to cash in on one of the biggest shopping days of the year. A similar story can be told about Cyber Monday – the first Monday after American Thanksgiving (November 27, this year) that has seen online retailers offer steep discounts to shoppers in an effort to siphon off some of the holiday sales that had formerly gone to brick and mortar retailers. By 2011, the shopping event had become entrenched in Canadian retail culture almost as thoroughly as Black Friday. Black Friday and Cyber Monday in Saskatchewan (historically) In 2015, Insightrix wanted to see how residents of Saskatchewan were participating in Black Friday and Cyber Monday. We ran a poll through our online community, SaskWatch Research, and we found that at that time, only 8% of Saskatchewan residents planned on doing most of their holiday shopping between Black Friday and Cyber Monday. In fact, most of the people polled (42%) stated they planned on doing the bulk of their holiday shopping between December 1-15. From this data, it wasn’t difficult to conclude that at this time, these shopping events hadn’t penetrated deeply into Saskatchewan retail culture. Black Friday and Cyber Monday in 2017 Insightrix was curious to see how these holiday shopping behaviours may have changed over time since the last time we looked into it. So, we ran another survey on the topic through our online community to see what, if any, changes had occurred. Fast-forward two years, and we see that behaviours around Black Friday and Cyber Monday have changed a great deal. Rather than the 8% who were planning on doing most of their holiday shopping between Black Friday and Cyber Monday in 2015, we found that 54% of those polled this year stated they would be doing at least some of their holiday shopping between those dates. Any guess as to why Saskatchewan residents have cottoned on to both of these sales events would be just that – a guess. One thing is certain, though, and that’s that Saskatchewan residents have included both Black Friday and Cyber Monday into their provincial retail culture. How much do residents expect to spend? Black Friday - A higher percentage of respondents (35%) who said they would be shopping Black Friday reported they expect to spend between $101-$250 during Black Friday sales. Twenty-six percent (26%) state they expect to spend between $251-$500 and another 21% said they expected to spend between $51-$100.  Cyber Monday – So, we then asked how much residents expect to spend during Cyber Monday sales and learned 30% of those who state they expect to participate in Cyber Monday sales expect to spend between $101-$250 online during Cyber Monday. Another 30% expect to spend between $51-$100, while 18% expect to spend between $251-$500. This holiday season, Insightrix is giving back by helping you give back! Do you want to be part of fun surveys like this one, or others that help you have your say in both business and political decisions in Saskatchewan? Head over to SaskWatch and register! Right now, SaskWatch Research and Insightrix are holding a promotion – Win free groceries for a month (up to $1000) and the opportunity to make a $1000 donation in your name to your local food bank. All you have to do to enter is register with SaskWatch! If you’re already a member, there are ways for you to win, too! Head over to the promotion Facebook page for rules and further information and sign up with SaskWatch today!  ...
 

Presentation of Market Research data remains a popular topic   In February of 2015, we published an article called 6 Creative Ways to Present Your Market Research Data that, before we knew it, became one of the most read and shared articles we’ve ever published. Fast-forward two and a half years, and that article is still doing well – still one of the most read and shared articles on our site. Which got us thinking that while the article still holds lots of value, some of the information in it may have gotten a little out of date in the intervening years. So, in the spirit of today’s Hollywood, we’ve decided to reboot it and make it more relevant to current audiences. Therefore, without further ado, we bring you – 6 Creative Ways to Present Your Market Research Data – The Reboot! Let’s get creative, people! With the large amounts of data that market researchers deal with, finding ways to present this information in a creative, interesting way can be a challenge. For years, some researchers have put the onus on the client when it comes to understanding, internalizing and actualizing their reports. Rather than providing concise reporting, in the past, many firms would data dump their clients with unwieldy and hard to follow reporting, thick with data and charts, and thin on actionable insight. There are better ways! Market research reporting can be interesting and assimilable! What follows are 6 creative ways you could be using to present your market research data. 1. Interactive Dashboards Interactive dashboards let you communicate important information to your audience. A dashboard is a visual display of the most significant information from a project. The information appears on a single screen, offering a quick and simple way to monitor and evaluate a study’s progress. Dashboards are a highly effective way to present data to executives who don’t have a lot of time and need to be able to check data at any point in a project. 2. Infographics Unless you’ve been living under a rock (or without an Internet connection), you’ve likely come into contact with lots of infographics over the last couple of years. They illustrate data and combine text, images and design to tell the story of a study. They have become exceedingly popular over the last few years since they present data in an engaging and easy-to-understand manner. Because the are so engaging and easy to grasp with little explanation, they are ideally suited to Internet and social media sharing. This boosts your chances for organic sharing. It’s because of this that Infographics are a great way to drive increased traffic to your website and highlight key elements of your data.   3. Presentation Software The days of coming to meetings with nothing but a few clip art-laden PowerPoint slides are way over (audible cheer!). If you want your data to stand out, try using out-of-the-box presentation software like Customshow or Prezi. These presentation platforms are a way to present information that engages audiences. They visually demonstrate how ideas relate to one another and allow collaboration in virtual space. Prezi and Customshow are cloud-based. So, you can present from your browser, desktop or tablet. Plus, you will always have the most recent version available. Presentation software like these offer visually engaging features such as zooming in and out of images and barrel rolls. This makes your insights both engaging and memorable.     4. Videos & Podcasts Sure, these formats are usually reserved for entertainment. They are also a great way to make your presentation more engaging. Podcasts [like the Insightrix Podcast] provide listeners an opportunity to immerse themselves in the narrative, or story, behind your research. They engage your audience in a way that offers you the opportunity to connect your research and your audience in meaningful ways and are relatively easy and inexpensive to attempt. Videos, on the other hand, let you put a face to your research and make study results more relatable and memorable. Vox pops (or streeter videos) are an effective way to bring research to life. They are video interviews with members of the public in which people speak on camera and tell the viewer what they think and how they feel about a particular subject. Videos and vox pops can supplement both qualitative and quantitative research. They are a compelling way to involve your audience in your research with minimal difficulty. *Pro Tip – Always make sure you have permission to film before setting up in any location.* #5. GIFs (Motion Graphics) GIFs, or motion graphics as they are sometimes called, are very short video clips. Though short, they can be a very impactful way to present your research by helping to create a story around your data. While they can be made up of video footage, they can also be used to create short, repeating slide shows of statistical data. Use of GIFs can help people understand difficult concepts and make your presentation more appealing. 6. Web & Mobile Apps   Everyone has a smartphone these days. As a result, apps are a great way to make your research more accessible to your clients. With a couple of quick taps of the screen, your clients can have access to your research at any time and at any place on their mobile devices. To top it off, the interactive nature of apps lets you control the research data you want to present. Like interactive dashboards, they can be out of the reach of most students and very small firms. That said, they are definitely worth the investment for small to medium firms looking to jazz up their presentations.     Presentation of Market Research Data can be engaging As you can see, presentation of market research data can be engaging - and it doesn't have to be rocket science getting it done. There are lots of other ways you can present your data. These examples are only a couple of ways we've found that have been especially well-received.  Can you think of other ways to present market research data?     ...
 

Who celebrated Halloween this year? It looks like it was a spooky one this year - roughly two thirds (66%) of the province planned on celebrating Halloween in 2017. That number breaks down demographically to show more females (72%) planned on celebrating than males (60%). Urban residents (74% in Saskatoon and 76% in Regina) also planned on celebrating much more than Saskatchewan residents living in the north (58%) and those who live in the south of the province (61%). People with one or more children (87%) planned on celebrating more than residents without kids (53%), and people of Indigenous ancestry (78%) planned on celebrating more than those who are not (65%). How did they celebrate Halloween? This year, the most popular ways people planned to celebrate Halloween were handing out candy (74%), taking the kids or grandkids trick or treating (49%) and decorating (45%). Some of the other popular ways people planned on spending the holidays were dressing up in a costume (36%), watching a scary movie or TV show (19%), dressing up their pets in costumes (13%) or going to a haunted house (13%). When it comes to costumes, men are spoil sports - only 30% saying they planned on wearing one at all. Forty percent of women, on the other hand, said they planned on wearing a costume for Halloween this year. Trick or treating – How old is too old for Halloween? There has been a lot of discussion about trick or treaters’ ages and whether there is an appropriate age for kids to hang up their masks for keeps. We thought we’d get an idea of how old is too old to be trick or treating. Most respondents (34%) agreed that 11-13 years old was the right time to retire the pillowcase. Others said that 14 years old (22%) is the correct age to stop, while 7% said 10 years or younger is just right. Another 7% said 15 is when kids should stop trick or treating, and 6% said that kids as old as 16 should be allowed to join in on the fun. Of note, the second most common response to this question (23%) was that people are never too old to trick or treat – so hang on to those old costumes! ZOINKS!!!!!! Since the season is a spooky one, we thought we ask a lighthearted question to break up the mood – little did we guess that the resulting responses would be so spine chilling. We asked Saskatchewan residents whether they had ever personally seen a ghost. As it turns out, 73% have not and 17% say they are unsure. Eerily, another 17% of the people of Saskatchewan have at one time or another, personally seen a ghost. Remember that next time someone asks you to grab something from the basement! Join in on the fun! Do you want to be part of fun surveys like this one, or others that help you have your say in both business and political decisions in Saskatchewan? Head over to SaskWatch and register! Right now, SaskWatch Research and Insightrix are holding a promotion – Win free groceries for a month (up to $1000) and the opportunity to make a $1000 donation in your name to your local food bank. All you have to do to enter is register with SaskWatch! If you’re already a member, there are ways for you to win, too! Head over to the promotion Facebook page for rules and further information and sign up with SaskWatch today!  ...