A new independent Insightrix Research poll asked Saskatchewan residents about what they think it means to be from Saskatchewan. Questions asked range from topics about slang to what they liked best about the province. Personality Traits of Saskatchewan Residents The survey asked respondents what personality traits describe the people of Saskatchewan. Overall, 83% of responses are positive, with the most popular traits being caring, friendly, and kind. Only 9% of responses are negative, with the most common words used being hicks, rednecks, or unsophisticated. The remaining responses are neutral and included words like conservative and traditional. Enjoyable elements about Living in Saskatchewan When asked about what people like most about living in Saskatchewan, 28% of respondents mentioned friendly people and a community feel to the province. Other popular responses include environmental reasons and clean air (24%), open spaces and flat lands (19%), small towns/small population (14%), a quiet, peaceful and relaxed lifestyle (11%), and being with friends and close family (9%). Dislikes about Living in Saskatchewan Unsurprisingly, the number one thing that people dislike about living in Saskatchewan is the cold winters and the weather, with almost half of all respondents (49%) mentioning this aspect. The next most commonly mentioned responses include narrow minded people (16%) and infrastructure issues (12%). Slang Insightrix asked respondents to identify whether or not they were familiar with different Saskatchewan slang words.  The most recognizable words by respondents are bunnyhug (96%), brewski (87%), gotch (86%), Vi-Co (77%), matrimonial cake (76%), gibbled (73%), and ‘2-4’ (71%). Frajolaki is the least recognizable word with only 33% saying they are familiar with it. Interestingly, the phrase ‘2-4’ is a more familiar term among males, while matrimonial cake and gibbled are terms that are more familiar among females.  Given that the Vi-co brand was retired in the mid 1990’s, it isn’t surprising that this variety of chocolate milk is more recognizable among Saskatchewan residents who are 35 years and older. Use of Slang Sure, the slang is certainly recognizable, but how often is it really used? We asked respondents how often they use these slang words in everyday speech. Once again, the most commonly used word is bunnyhug. A vast majority of Saskatchewanians (85%) use the word at least sometimes, with 33% indicating they always use this word to describe this article of clothing. The second most commonly used slang word is gibbled, which has 52% of respondents indicating they use it at least sometimes in their conversations. Other slang words used at least sometimes in their conversations include ‘2-4’ (41%), Matrimonial Cake (41%), Brewski (44%), and Vi-Co (33%). Frajolaki is once again the least commonly used term, with 13% of respondents indicating they use this term at least sometimes. Research Details A total of 804 randomly selected SaskWatch Research™ panel members participated in the online research study from March 9th to 13th, 2015. Quotas were set by age, gender and region to match the general population of the province. As the research is conducted online, it is considered to be a non-probability proportion sample and therefore, margins of error are not applicable. About Insightrix Founded in 2001, Insightrix Research Inc. is a full-service market research firm that helps clients develop, administer, and manage data collection and information strategies. From its office in Saskatoon, Insightrix offers a comprehensive range of research services.  Insightrix also owns and manages the largest Saskatchewan-based online research panel, SaskWatch Research™, which currently has over 15,000 Saskatchewan residents as members. For more information, please contact Lang McGilp, Senior Research Executive Insightrix Research Inc. Tel: 306.657.5640 ext. 229 Cell: 306.281.4434 Email: lang.mcgilp@insightrix.com Web: www.insightrix.com...
 

A new independent Insightrix Research poll reveals support on issues such as the building of a new hospital, and the fairness of municipal taxes within Weyburn.  Results are a bit more mixed regarding the lowering of speed limits around school zones and whether or not Weyburn is undergoing too much development for its current and future needs. New Hospital? A new independent poll conducted by Insightrix Research shows that the majority of Weyburn residents would like to see a new hospital built. Overall, 82% of residents support the addition of a second hospital. Another 14% don’t want to see a new hospital erected in Weyburn, and 4% aren’t sure. Those who disagree cite reasons such as, if a new hospital was built they would still be referred to larger centres for many procedures (34%), the old building just needs to be fixed (25%), and the current hospital just needs more staff (23%), while the remainder didn’t know or didn’t have a comment. Females and those aged 18-34 are more likely to want a new hospital built than males and those aged 35 and over. When asked about the potential location of a new hospital, 73% of respondents said it should be located close to the current hospital. Municipal Taxes Insightrix asked Weyburn residents if they thought municipal taxes were at a fair level. Respondents generally agreed that they paid a fair amount of tax (68%), while only 13% believe that they pay an unfair amount of tax. The remaining 19% didn't know or weren't sure. School zone speed limits Insightrix asked the survey respondents if they believe Weyburn should impose lower speed limits around school areas. Respondents were split, with 51% agreeing that they should be lowered, and 46% disagreeing. Respondents who were in the 18-34 and 35-54 demographics were more likely to disagree with lowering the speed limit than those who were in the 55+ demographic. Too much development? Insightrix asked respondents if they thought Weyburn was undergoing too much development for the city’s current and future needs. Once again results were split, with 52% agreeing that it was undergoing too much development and 43% disagreeing. Residents in the 18-34 and 35-54 demographics are more likely to disagree that the city is undergoing too much development than those who are 55+ Research Details A total of 320 randomly selected Weyburn residents participated in the research study, which was conducted over the telephone from February 18th to March 3rd, 2015. Quotas were set by age and gender to match the city’s population.  The results for this study are accurate within ± 5.39 percentage points 19 times out of 20. About Insightrix Founded in 2001, Insightrix Research Inc. is a full-service market research firm that helps clients develop, administer, and manage data collection and information strategies. From its office in Saskatoon, Insightrix offers a comprehensive range of research services.  Insightrix also owns and manages the largest Saskatchewan-based online research panel, SaskWatch Research™, which currently has over 15,000 Saskatchewan residents as members. For more information, please contact Mario Caceres, Senior Research Executive Insightrix Research Inc. Tel: 306.657.5640 ext. 258 Cell: 306.281.4434 Email: mario.caceres@insightrix.com Web: www.insightrix.com...
 

With the large amounts of data that market researchers deal with, finding ways to present data in a creative, interesting way can be a challenge. Here's a list of the six best ways to present your research data. #1: Interactive Dashboards Interactive dashboards let you communicate important information to your audience. A dashboard is a visual display of the most significant information from a project. The information appears on a single screen, offering a quick and simple way to monitor and evaluate a study’s progress. Dashboards are a highly effective way to present data to executives who don’t have a lot of time and need to be able to check data at any point in a project. #2. Infographics Infographics illustrate data and combine text, images, and design to tell the story of a study. They are becoming increasingly popular and since infographics present data in an engaging and easy-to-understand manner, they are frequently shared on social media, boosting the viral capabilities of your information. Infographics can drive increased traffic to your website and highlight key elements of your data. #3. Prezi Prezi is a new way to present information that engages audiences, visually demonstrates how ideas relate to one another, and allows collaboration in virtual space. Prezi is cloud-based, so you can present from your browser, desktop, or iPad and you will always have the most recent version available. Prezi offers visually engaging features such as zooming in and out of images and barrel rolls. Prezi is engaging and memorable, helping you make great presentations. #4. Videos/Vox Pops Videos let you put a face to the research, making study results more relatable and memorable. Vox pops are another effective way to bring research to life: vox pops (or streeters) are interviews with members of the public where people speak on camera and tell the viewer what they think and how they feel about a particular subject. Videos and vox pops can supplement both qualitative and quantitative research and is compelling way to involve the viewer in the research. #5. Motion Graphics Motion graphics are graphics that use video footage or animation technology to create the appearance of movement. They are often combined with audio and used in multimedia projects. Motion graphics are a captivating way to present your data and they help create a story for your data. The graphics help people understand concepts more clearly and make your project more appealing. #6. Web & Mobile Apps The increase in the number of smartphone users has led to the development of new ways of presenting data. In the increasingly fast-moving world, people need to be able to check reports and research data at any time, and apps are the perfect solution. Web apps let users check research data on their mobile devices, and the interactive nature of the apps lets the user control the research data they want to access and present. Apps are intuitive, easy to use, and an engaging way to view data and results. Related post: 4 Chart Tips to Turnaround Your Report Quickly ...
 

According to a new independent poll conducted by Insightrix Research Inc., 32% of Saskatchewan residents in romantic relationships are expecting to “do the deed” on Valentine’s Day this year, consistent with findings in 2014. Given that only 23% of individuals report having sex at least once a week, playing your cards well on Valentine’s Day does indeed increase your odds for intimacy. With a significant portion of males (58%) wishing they had sex at least once a week, we looked into how they can get their partner on the same page this Valentine’s Day. While the leading turn on for both males and females is a massage or caress (30%), it turns out that females are looking to pages to get into the mood, with females being significantly more likely than males to pick up a romance novel to get their wheels rolling. So are Saskatchewanians purchasing gifts this Valentine’s Day? Males are significantly more likely than females (61% vs. 44%) to be purchasing a gift for their significant other this weekend, and are directing their attention to jewellery and flowers for their partners. Looks like men are hitting the right spot with these plans as females are significantly more likely to be expecting flowers (45%), a romantic meal (30%), and jewellery (17%). The fellas are planning on spending an average of $80.77. Men on the other hand, are more likely to be expecting to receive gift cards (19%), and clothing (16%). Tough luck for the gals though, who are more likely to be buying chocolates (43%) or a greeting card (39%). Not shocking that Saskatchewan ladies are planning to spend less than male counterparts, at an average of $56.35 – still a fair amount of that chocolate aphrodisiac! That being said, all is good in love and war; 70% of Saskatchewan residents would marry their spouse again if they had the option, with those 35 and older being more likely to admit they are still on board! Research Details A total of 800 randomly selected SaskWatch Research™ panel members participated in the online research study from February 2nd to 6th, 2015. Quotas were set by age, gender and region to match the general population of the province. As the research is conducted online, it is considered to be a non-probability proportion sample and therefore, margins of error are not applicable. For more findings on this survey, please visit http://www.insightrix.com/saskatchewan-valentine-day-intimacy-survey/ About SaskWatch Research™ Insightrix began developing its SaskWatch Research™ online market research panel in October 2007, using high-quality techniques including telephone recruitment and referrals from existing panel members. Presently, there are over 15,000 active panel members representing all regions of the province and distributions of the general population. The panel membership closely matches the 2011 Census based on age, gender, household composition, household income, and education. For more information, please visit http://saskwatch.ca. About Insightrix Founded in 2001, Insightrix Research Inc. is a full-service market research firm that helps clients develop, administer, and manage data collection and information strategies. From its office in Saskatoon, Insightrix offers a comprehensive range of research services. For more information, please contact: Mario Caceres, Senior Research Executive at Insightrix Research Inc. Tel: 306.657.5640 ext. 258 mario.caceres@insightrix.com...
 

A new independent Insightrix Research online poll reveals support on issues such as rental suites, P3’s, and carbon capture technology. Results are a bit more mixed regarding the views of those from outside the community and personal impacts from the lower oil prices. Rental suites A new independent poll conducted by Insightrix Research shows that majority of Estevan residents believe enough is being done to encourage the addition of new rental units to the Estevan accommodation market. Overall, 61% of residents agree enough is being done in this area. Another 23% do not agree and 16% don’t know. Women are more likely to agree that enough is being done to encourage the addition of new rental units to the Estevan accommodation market. Views on people outside the community Insightrix asked Estevan residents if the transient nature of oilfield workers impacted their view of people from outside the community. Just less than one half of those surveyed (45%) indicated it has had a negative impact. Approximately one-quarter (26%) indicated it has not changed their view and 23% believe it has positively impacted their view of people from outside the community. Another 6% did not know. Public-private partnerships Insightrix asked the survey respondents if they support or oppose the use of public-private partnerships or P3’s to fund health care, education, and other services. Approximately two thirds of respondents (68%) indicated they support the use of P3’s to fund health care, education and other services. Less than one-quarter (22%) do not support them and 10% did not know. The price of oil Insightrix asked Estevan residents how the sliding price of oil has impacted them personally. The results to this survey question was generally mixed with 24% indicating a positive impact, 38% indicating a negative impact, and 37% indicating no impact at all. Carbon capture technology Finally, we asked whether the carbon capture technology that is happening at the Boundary Dam Power Station is an acceptable means of maintaining coal as a source of power. Our results showed that residents in Estevan support carbon capture technology with 84% of respondents agreeing that it is an acceptable means of maintain coal as a source of power. Research Details A total of 300 randomly selected Estevan residents participated in the research study, which was conducted over the telephone from January 19th to February 2nd, 2015. Quotas were set by age and gender to match the city’s population. The results for this study are accurate within ± 5.58 percentage points 19 times out of 20. About Insightrix Founded in 2001, Insightrix Research Inc. is a full-service market research firm that helps clients develop, administer, and manage data collection and information strategies. From its office in Saskatoon, Insightrix offers a comprehensive range of research services. Insightrix also owns and manages the largest Saskatchewan-based online research panel, SaskWatch Research™, which currently has over 15,000 Saskatchewan residents as members. For more information, please contact Mario Caceres, Senior Research Executive Insightrix Research Inc. Tel: 306.657.5640 ext. 258 Cell: 306.281.4434 Email: mario.caceres@insightrix.com Web: www.insightrix.com...
 

Here at Insightrix Research Inc., we’ve been feverishly preparing for our joyous holiday celebrations both in and out of the office. In the last few weeks we have kick started the season by delivering treats to our neighbouring businesses, visited the Ronald McDonald House with gifts, delivered in-kind donations to a variety of organizations, volunteered at the Friendship Inn, and even celebrated National Ugly Sweater Day. Last week we delivered a fun survey to our SaskWatch panelists for points, matching each donation if given to charity, and we received some great insight into the spending and shopping habits of those around Saskatchewan! For an extra splash of fun, we took to the streets and asked the folks about their holiday season habits! Catch the streeter here: ...
 

By Corrin Harper, CEO and President, Insightrix Research Inc. Recently I had the opportunity to attend the W100 Idea Exchange designed specifically for women entrepreneurs, by the editors of PROFIT and Chatelaine. The Idea Exchange, held at the Ritz Carleton in Toronto on November 26th, provided a unique opportunity to share best practices with other leading women entrepreneurs, to learn from management experts about today's key business opportunities and challenges, and to create personal connections with other top entrepreneurs. Both being educational and inspirational, what a wonderful experience it was! One item from the exchange really resonated with me – every entrepreneur has to find their own path and use lessons they learn along the way to their advantage. Entrepreneurs – no matter what their educational background – achieve success by focusing on their passion and backing it up with an unparalleled work ethic. Here are a few tips that were discussed at the Exchange that can help a person become the most successful entrepreneur possible. Work Hard, No Matter What If you aren’t giving it 100 percent, you won’t be successful, and this resonates beyond business. Success is directly related to the amount of effort you’re willing put in. Always. Giving 100 percent does not mean having to put in 100 hours a week, but it does mean taking care of your investment, taking the breaks when needed to clear your mind to see things from a fresh perspective, and above all, it means being dedicated and driven to meeting the projective goals. People are Your Greatest Assets All businesses need a range of skills to be sustainable and be able to grow. As the owner of a business, you are called upon to perform several roles out of necessity. However, there are some roles you are better at than others. If you want your business to progress, it will reach a stage when necessary skills, need to be improved and extended. Getting the right mix of people to complement and reinforce your skills is essential. When hiring for a small [firm/business], you need employees who demonstrate entrepreneurial characteristics and work habits. Employees come in all shapes and sizes,with all sorts of diverse skills and quirks. Look for those who can handle risk, are results oriented, a team player, high energy, and growth-oriented. No one is perfect, so create a environment where these dynamics are supported and work with employees to maximize their potential in those areas. Learn from Your Hits and Misses Every entrepreneur will have missteps and false starts along the way, but they will end up helping in the long run. You have to be prepared to take those high reward risks and accept the fact that you will make mistakes along the way. The key is not to fall into the trap of believing you always have to get everything right. Risk Taking Risk-taking is almost synonymous with entrepreneurship. When just starting your business, you’ll have to put your career, personal finances, and sometimes even your mental health at stake. Almost all entrerpreuneurs at the Idea Exchange shared stories about abandonig their steady paycheck, sacrificing personal capital, and donating personal time and health. Let’s face it -- this sounds awful. However entrepreneurs frequently talk about this as being the best time of their life! Because we are dedicated to our business, enjoy what we are doing, and worked hard to overcome those stressors, we often reflect on these times with a positive feeling, knowing how far we’ve really come. The Exchange was a wonderful experience, sharing stories with other entrepreneurs, and one that I will remember always....
 

#1. What does a research company need to know from me? If your business has questions that need answering you may have made the same decision that a lot of businesses do: turning to market research to get those answers. However, for companies that have never done market research before, it may be difficult to know what they need to do in order to get the best possible results. Start with an internal discussion of what problems your business may be facing. You don’t need to know exactly how you will address those questions through research – that’s where the provider will come in. Also think about what goals you are hoping to achieve with your research results and who in your organization will need to use these results. Talk with stakeholders within your organization to see what’s on their wish list to know. These points will allow the researchers to choose a research methodology that will fit your needs. Furthermore, letting your research provider know what kind of budget you are working with will help them operate within your means. #2. Who is my target population? Determining your target population or respondent group (those who will be providing you with answers – such as current or potential customers, employees, or other stakeholder groups) is crucial to gathering actionable results that answer the research objectives. The target respondent is often determined by thinking critically about what hurdle your business is trying to overcome. For example, if you wanted to determine customer satisfaction for a line of winter tires, you might want to survey only those with a vehicle. Your target audience may be quite general (all Canadians, for example) or quite specific. If you’re unsure of who your target audience is, our team of research executives can help you pin-point exactly who you should be talking to. For example, our SaskWatch Research™ Panel has over 100 profile questions to ensure your survey is taken by exactly who you want to reach. #3. What are quotas and do I need them? Quotas are partitions of the population that are created to make sure that your research is representative of the population you’re trying to survey. For example, if you want to get an idea about what Canadians think about a certain topic, you would want to have about half of the people answering to be male and half female in order to match demographics. The most common quotas are based on age, gender, and region. Setting quotas helps you to make sure that the research results that you get are applicable to the population at large. This extra step allows you to make accurate forecasts about things like market share or uptake of a new product. #4. What approach should I take? What kind of research methods you utilize depends on what kind of answers you’re looking for. If the questions you want to ask start with ‘how many, how often, what, and where,’ then chances are you will want to use a method of quantitative research. This type of research is intended to be statistically reflective of the market, and will give you quantitative statistics that you can extrapolate to a larger population. If your question is about ‘why’ or ‘how,’ you might want to utilize a qualitative research method. Qualitative research employs methods, such as focus groups and in-depth interviews, allow you to dig deeper, but with fewer respondents. These exploratory research methods more fully uncover respondents’ perceptions, experiences and feelings, and add additional context to quantitative results. The division between qualitative and quantitative research is frequently blurred. Often, a comprehensive research project will involve more than one type of research to answer various objectives. #5. How much data should be collected? This question depends heavily on what kind of budget you are working with, however, spending more is not necessarily better. Depending on what your objective is, impactful research can be done on a relatively minimal budget. Think about how much detail you need in order to make whatever business decisions you’re trying to make. Are you looking to understand if your customers are satisfied with a certain product? Measuring a potential customer’s perception and barriers? Determining the awareness of your brand on a local scale? Whatever the need, it is crucial that enough respondents are obtained to ensure your results are statistically valid. However, paying more to get extremely accurate results when the organization is not able to take action on them means wasted budget. An experienced research provider can guide you to making these decisions and recommend an effective methodology. #6. How long will it take? How long your research takes depends on what type of research you are wanting to conduct, how many people you want to reach, and what method you would like to use (telephone takes longer than online, for example). It also depends on how clear you are with your research objectives. Your research provider will provide you timeline at the beginning of your project so that you are able to plan accordingly. However, there are options if you are in a crunch for time. For example, Insightrix offers a monthly OnTopic™ omnibus survey. OnTopic™ surveys are great if you only have a few questions to ask and have a tight deadline on the data needed. Your questions will be combined with other omnibus clients and is given as one single survey to our panelists. OnTopic™ has a one week turnaround, giving you faster access to the answers you’ve been looking for. #7. How will I be kept aware of the progress of my research? Your project will be assigned a project manager that will keep you informed on the status of your research. This is your primary point of contact and this individual will be the one to inform you if any complications should arise. Especially if your research project has a long field window, you may want to monitor the results as interviews are taking place. Topline reporting allows clients to monitor the results of each survey the moment the responses are collected. The results ideally include user-friendly features that display counts, percentages, and graphs for each question, offering the ability to share these topline results within your organization. #8. What kind of results will I receive? Research results don’t mean much if they are indecipherable. Depending on the needs of your business, there are many different types of deliverables that can be provided at the end of your research project, such as written reports in Word, PowerPoint reports, detailed tables, in-person presentations, infographics, to name a few. With individuals at all levels in an organization becoming shorter and shorter on time, a concise reporting style is essential. Sharp analysis, visually-engaging presentations, structured narrative, and succinct summaries as well as infographics that “pop” and engaging videos will engage stakeholders with the story your data is trying to tell....
 

We’ve all been there - your client needs the report by noon tomorrow, and though you may have the meat and potatoes, you scratch your head at the prospect of presenting all that data in a visual way. In anticipation that you will communicate your study’s results in a way that is attractive and straight to the point (but in a time restraint), time management can be problematic. Don’t fret, a few simple chart tips can save some of that precious time. Many researchers cling to the standard bar graphs, and when creating a report with a fast turnaround, disregard data visualisation in lieu of time management. When under pressure, these few, simple practices can help you create a quick and clean visual that your client can truly understand. #1. Plan ahead – When inserting a graph or chart in your report, it is important to decide what information you wish to display. If you’re skipping lunch to finish said document, then chances are you do not have extra time to fiddle with changes in the display of data for each chart. Each time you re-make a format decision, you could run into time management issues. Simply formulating a plan allows you to save time in the long run. Choosing a simple chart will allow for more time to control the quality before the report lands in your client’s hands – and often simpler is better anyway. #2. Consider your target audience– Even with a formulated plan, it’s important to think about the purpose of charting to begin with. A great chart must achieve its purpose – it must be meaningful to the beholder. As well, keep in mind as to who is all looking at the report. Different levels in the organization require different levels of detail. Often a chart geared toward an executive needs less detail than a manager responsible for that particular product line. #3. A graph isn’t always the answer– I know, contradiction much? Not everyone reads charts every day. At times, using a chart can cloud the result instead of giving it clarity. By simply contrasting white space within your report, tables or textboxes can be just as visually impactful as charts. Highlighting differences with colour, especially when dealing with qualitative or open-ended responses, can also help to effectively convey a message without using a chart. #4. Perform a clarity test – Sometimes when working too close to a document, one needs a fresh set of eyes to graze over the information. Before pushing the report out, have a co-worker or peer review the visual data information without any context. If they can read the data without needing extensive background information, then you have succeeded in representing the data in a way it can stand alone. Studies with a smorgasbord of charts can prove puzzling, and may be curtly disregarded by a client short on time. Your clients expect that the report findings will provide clear answers to their objectives, and most importantly, illustrate the story behind the data. And at the end of the day the researcher is the illustrator, whereas the data remains the ink to craft the story. Have a plan, know your audience, provide clarity and generalize data in a way it can be read across the board. Related post: 6 Creative Ways to Present Your Market Research Data...
 

Because of recent news events, the 2014 CIRPA conference in Hamilton, Ontario had a more introspective atmosphere compared to years past. All the same, the conference was full of great information and friendly people, all wanting to share their knowledge and insights on various facets of institutional research. Many of the themes at this year’s conference had been recognized in sessions in prior years ; however, these trends continued to evolve with advancements in technology and broader, worldwide changes in research. There were many new insights at the sessions. In my opinion, two interesting themes were changes in data collection and changes in data dissemination: the types of data and methods to collect primary data, and the ways in which the research results are being disseminated to key stakeholder groups. Survey methodologies are quickly evolving, in educational institutions and elsewhere in market research. As mobile phones become ubiquitous, the more imperative it is that researchers adapt their survey design and their expectations to the changing technology. In this regard, the use of mobile phones to take surveys has been steadily increasing – to such an extent that research must take the device into account – most specifically in the design of the survey. This means more than making sure the survey technically works on a smartphone. It might mean shortening surveys or adapting the question types to be easier to complete on a mobile device. There was a roar of discussion in boosting survey results with other data, including nationally or provincially collected statistics from government agencies and data containing online conversations through social media sites. Additionally, more sophisticated data tools and outcomes-driven predictive modelling, on things like retention and enrolment, are becoming more common as a part of an educational institution’s research toolkit. I find this development promising and it has the capacity to be a relevant theme for many years, as the amount and nature of the data that is available increases. Disseminating information within a large organization such as an educational institution can be difficult. For this reason, many research groups are actively creating tailored materials to disseminate information for a variety of audiences. At CIRPA, there were several sessions with tips on data visualization, dashboarding, and combining multiple datasets into more holistic research results. With the amount and variety of information ever increasing, it is often difficult to ensure that stakeholders aren’t drowning in data. I anticipate it will become common for institutional research groups to provide stakeholders with more frequent and shorter sets of research results, rather than a long, drawn out report that they may or may not have time to read at once. This follows a greater theme in research where clients are increasingly asking for a suite of deliverables rather than a single report. The conference left me with a feeling of confidence in the way that institutional researchers are tackling some of the major changes in the industry. Adaptability is key in making sure that participation in research remains high, and I saw evidence of many institutions innovating their current practices to address these needs. Overall, it was a great conference where I had a great time connecting with old friends and making new ones. I’m looking forward to seeing everyone in Halifax for CIRPA 2015!...