How will Saskatchewan residents be celebrating Thanksgiving this year?   For the most part, most of Saskatchewan will be celebrating Thanksgiving 2018! We ran an OnTopic® survey between September 17 – 20, 2018, with members of our SaskWatch Research® online panel in all parts of Saskatchewan to find out how residents of the province plan on spending their Thanksgiving 2018. We found out that most residents of the province (87%) plan to celebrate Thanksgiving in some way. We also learned that more women (90%) than men (84%) are planning to celebrate the holiday. Age seems to have some bearing on Thanksgiving plans, as well. Interestingly, more young residents are planning to celebrate Thanksgiving in 2018 than older residents of the province. Nine out of ten (90%) residents aged between 18 – 34 years old stated they plan to celebrate their reasons for being thankful – a full 7% more than those aged 55 years and older (83%). Less statistically significant, but still worth noting, 89% of those aged 35 – 54 reported they also plan to celebrate a Canadian Thanksgiving in 2018. How will Saskatchewan residents celebrate Thanksgiving 2018? By a great margin, it turns out that Sask. residents really enjoy eating with their loved ones over Thanksgiving. More than nine out of ten (94%) respondents who said they planned on celebrating Thanksgiving in 2018 reported that having a meal at home with friends and/or family was the way they plan on celebrating the holiday in 2018. While Thanksgiving dinner was by far the most popular planned activity in 2018, Sask. residents who said they plan on celebrating the holiday also said they plan to watch football (17%), decorate their homes (15%) or enjoy a meal out at a restaurant with friends and/or family (5%). Only 4% of those who plan on celebrating this year said they plan on decorating their places of work, 3% said they had other plans entirely – and 2% said they plan on enjoying the holiday all alone. What will Saskatchewan residents eat for Thanksgiving 2018? Now that we know that eating with friends and/or family is on everyone’s mind this year, let’s look at what Saskatchewan residents who plan on celebrating the holiday will be sitting down to at Thanksgiving dinner in 2018. Not surprising was that 85% of them stated they plan to go back to that tried and true Thanksgiving champion – turkey - for Thanksgiving dinner. This may be a case of not fixing what isn’t broken, as many of those reliable Thanksgiving dinner sides were also mentioned. Seventy-six percent (76%) stated they plan on enjoying some stuffing for dinner, 74% said they were looking forward to having gravy and 74% said they want to get some mashed potatoes in, as well. Pumpkin pie is looked forward to by 71%, and 45% anticipate cranberry sauce in their future. Dinner rolls are also looking like a popular choice (43%) and almost four in ten (39%) plan to partake in some ham rather than the more popular Thanksgiving turkey. Apple pie is once again dominated by the choice for its rival, pumpkin pie – only 29% of those who plan on celebrating Thanksgiving plan to eat it this year. Sweet potatoes are something that one quarter (25%) look forward to, 8% plan to eat wild game and only 2% are planning to choose fish for Thanksgiving dinner. More than one in ten (11%) of those who plan to celebrate Thanksgiving plan to eat something else entirely. Check out the word cloud below for some of these Thanksgiving dinner choices (responses depicted larger were more popular and smaller ones were less popular).  Thanksgiving dinner continues to be a big deal in Saskatchewan It looks like Thanksgiving remains something that many Saskatchewan residents look forward to and plan for – and younger residents seem to be embracing the holiday more than their older counterparts. Thanksgiving dinner is the most popular planned activity to celebrate the holiday by quite a large margin, but Sask. residents also plan to watch football and to decorate their homes.    We also learned that traditional choices beat out more unconventional ones when it comes to Thanksgiving meal planning in Saskatchewan in 2018. Pumpkin pie and turkey are still the people’s champions when it comes to Thanksgiving dinner choices, beating out apple pie and ham by quite a bit. There may be something to not fixing things that aren’t broken after all. To view the full infographic, click here.  Do you want to participate in fun and interesting research like this? You can! Register with SaskWatch Research® today and start participating right away. SaskWatch Research is Saskatchewan’s largest online research community, comprising over 18,000+ Saskatchewan residents from all over the province. When you become a SaskWatch member, you’ll have the opportunity to weigh in on important issues in Saskatchewan, and have your voice heard on concerns related to brands and businesses. ...
 

Insightrix recently ran an OnTopic survey to determine the state of philanthropy in Saskatchewan. Saskatchewan residents are a pretty charitable bunch, with 95% of Saskatchewan residents reporting they have donated money to a charitable organization at one point or another. Those charitable contributions add up – and the organizations Sask. residents are donating to and the amounts they are donating haven’t changed much over the last year. Where are they donating? When comes to the percentage of their charitable donations, residents still donate as much as they did last year to organizations in the field of healthcare – 40% this year and 40% in 2017. For those who report that they have donated to a charity, a similar story can be seen in donations to hospitals (36% in 2017 and 34% in 2018), pet shelters (32% in 2017 and 34% in 2018) and to food banks (41% in 2017 and 39% in 2018). The only real fluctuation occurs in donations to religious organizations, whose donations have increased from 34% of the monies donated by residents who donated to charities in 2017 to 41% in 2018. Where are they volunteering? In 2018, Saskatchewan volunteers participated in a wide range of activities, such as fundraising, event organizing, participating as a board member and many more activities. In fact, in the past 12 months, 55% of Saskatchewan residents participated in volunteer activities at some time or another. For some activities, volunteerism in Saskatchewan has increased to some degree. While 64% of Saskatchewan residents who volunteered engaged in fundraising activities in 2017, that number grew to 77% in 2018. A similar situation emerges when looking at organizing and coordinating (66% in 2017, 75% in the last 12 months) and maintenance volunteering (37% in 2017 and 51% in the last 12 months). Acting as a board or committee member, on the other hand, is something just as many Saskatchewan volunteers got up to in 2017 as they did in the past 12 months – 59% of Saskatchewan volunteers. Why did they do it? According to those who were involved in volunteering in Saskatchewan, for the most part, being a volunteer was something they benefited from. Beyond a feeling of having done something worthwhile, some volunteers stated they benefited physically through their activity – 55% of those who volunteered in the past 12 months said they feel healthier, and 77% stated it improved their mood. It wasn’t just physical benefits for volunteering, though. Of those who volunteered in the past 12 months, 40% stated they benefited through increased time management skills, and a whopping 74% said they now enjoy improved people and teamwork skills. Do you want to participate in fun and interesting research like this? You can! Register with SaskWatch Research® today and start participating right away. SaskWatch Research is Saskatchewan’s largest online research community, comprising over 18,000+ Saskatchewan residents. By becoming a SaskWatch member, you can weigh in on important issues in Saskatchewan, and have your voice heard on concerns relating brands and businesses. Learn More >>...
 

Market research is a powerful tool for advocacy In an internet age, not-for-profit organizations should understand how important it is to adopt market research as advocacy to help inform their public interest initiatives. Because not-for-profits are vital to the local communities they serve, it is their shared responsibility to encourage policy and law makers to do what is right for the public. By using advocacy market research, not-for-profits can adopt a robust tool to put their cases forward and reach change agents in all levels of government.   This is research for advocacy in a nutshell. In most funding circles, advocacy is often considered an “art of persuasion”; it can be loosely defined as “converting the impossible into the inevitable”. Ask any campaign manager and they will tell you the same. The question is: How do campaign managers convert the impossible and reach the public to create more awareness and become relevant to policymakers?   Research for advocacy When we think of research for advocacy, some may think of decades of long, drawn-out research studies that show obscure connections between lifestyle and behaviour factors. And while some industry research can take many years to yield actionable results, research for advocacy can often be done MORE QUICKLY and can deliver information that is sometimes more relevant to policymakers. One way to get an advocacy message in front of the public is by undertaking and publicizing research that demonstrates the need for such laws or policies, the public support behind them and the likely results if the change were implemented. For example, as part of Tourism Saskatoon’s strategic plan, they identified the need to expand hosting capacity and to remain competitive for business and sporting events. For the past several years, the city of Saskatoon has seen on and off support for a new downtown arena and convention centre. Because Tourism Saskatoon ran a public opinion poll conducted by Insightrix to promote their advocacy message, they received media coverage to help grow support and validate their city planning initiatives. Insightrix worked with the Tourism Saskatoon on the question wording to ensure that the answers represented the views of the community, and were not leading, thereby ensuring credibility. This is an example of publicizing research that demonstrates the direct interest of the community. https://globalnews.ca/news/4101828/downtown-arena-tourism-saskatoon/ (media coverage) http://www.tourismsaskatoon.com/about/about-strategic-plan/ (strategic plan) What distinguishes research for advocacy from other types of evidence-based research is that it is focused on specific answers in mind, and that it is a part of an overarching strategy to influence potential policy development and policy change. While other research can contribute to the overall understanding of an issue, market research for advocacy has a narrow and specific aim, and it does not have to take a lot of time or money to be effective for advocacy campaigns.    Think like an NGO and run an Omnibus Poll Most NGOs conduct research in-house, but can use market research firms to help with validating or creating evidence for the larger research projects undertaken by these organizations. NGOs often use market research to “top up” their existing research by employing omnibus surveys and using locally-conducted research. Omnibus surveys often make good news, particularly if your research is interesting and shows potential for strong public support for the initiative at hand. Not-for-profits should monitor how NGOs conduct omnibus polling – as these kinds of research methodologies can be done easily and are inexpensive to conduct. At Insightrix, we run a monthly omnibus poll. Omnibus surveys are a quick and cost-effective, potent research tool that doesn’t break the bank. Our monthly omnibus sample is random and representative: we set quotas by region, age and gender to ensure the sample matches the distribution of the populations. When thinking about conducting an omnibus survey – keep two things in mind: your story should be newsworthy and contain something interesting that will catch people’s attention (or the attention of journalists), and it should also incorporate the advocacy message. Many NGOs have created media partnerships that have proven to be fruitful. With the internet becoming an important tool to promote timely research, low-cost media advocacy is an inexpensive way to increase your initiative’s chances for success, especially when it becomes news.   Getting an “in” with the media Using the media to get your advocacy research in front of the public is an effective way to secure better policies on a range of issues.  Cultivating relationships with journalists and local media can be difficult – that is, until you get your in with them. Media professionals are often on the look out for good ideas to write about for an article or to produce a segment for broadcast, and they pay close attention to press releases they receive. However, your press or media release itself is not the objective of advocacy; it is the effect of the news coverage that is important, and that may not always be easy to measure. One of the best ways to get your in with the media is to be analytical in your own observations of the media and their interactions with those you’re trying to reach. Attempt to understand what type of news is considered newsworthy - What appeals to readers? What issues gain little attention and which gain a lot? Are there local journalists who are more interested in social issues than others? Through your own research, you can see what gets covered in the media and how that information is presented. Doing this will create advocacy research that is desirable to media, that will be easier to digest and that will more than likely land you publicity for your initiative.   Use omnibus research to spur your advocacy efforts Media and research are two extremely valuable tools that can increase the awareness of your advocacy research and often require few resources other than the time and people to see them through. By using more advocacy to validate long-term research, by strengthening your relationship with the media (thereby building the understanding of the population), it will be much easier to influence the policies that matter to them most over time.  ...
 

Gauge citizen engagement - check in with the people who matter most Imagine you are a manager within a municipal department and/or provincial ministry. Now, imagine you are asked if citizens are aware of and satisfied with your department’s services, or perhaps if they have seen and can recall your department’s ad campaign.   Yikes!  How are you going to do this? How can you measure your success and get data to help in planning your next steps? OK – take a minute to breathe. It’s not really happening! This situation is fictional, of course. After all, this isn’t 1988. Today, you can easily get this data! However, budgets are tight and you need research that is not only timely, but that is affordable as well. Policy planning cannot be built on intuition. To do any good planning upfront or to validate those plans later, you need a pulse check to ensure initiatives or plans are on the right track - and any good plan has proper research behind it. How does omnibus research work? Government employees who employ omnibus research work together with research professionals to develop expertly crafted research questions to obtain the information they need. These research questions can be asked in one or two ways, either as closed or open-ended questions, depending on the kind of intelligence desired. Examples of closed questions Closed questions are designed to get a specific response from the population – either a yes or no answer, or perhaps a response to a multiple response question (one that asks for responses that involve picking one or more responses from a pre-determined list of possible responses). Example of an open-ended question Open-ended questions ask the population for a verbatim response, allowing for you to obtain citizen engagement in their own words. With the choice of either open-ended or closed questions, you have the choice of asking either qualitative or quantitative research questions – meaning there is virtually no end to the types of issues you can examine.   What kinds of market research are available to government managers? With omnibus research, you can obtain intelligence of almost any kind, and benefit from consultation with experienced researchers to ensure the survey is accurate and regionally representative. Measure citizen engagement and citizen participation in new or existing initiatives. Understand how initiatives have performed with the people who matter most – residents in your province or city itself. Provide needed information to inform stakeholders of the importance of a cause or issue. Answer objections that may be raised about a proposed policy change before rolling it out. Demonstrate popular support for a specific policy or program.   There are very few research topics market research cannot answer for governments. In the past, Insightrix has provided research insight on many policy and planning decisions. Awareness and usage of government services Recall rates of government advertising campaigns Satisfaction with specific government services Citizen opinion research relating to hot-button issues like the legalization of cannabis, anti-bullying policies, etc.   Government can do fast, lean research In times of shrinking budgets, the research budget is often one of those hardest hit. Maximize research budgets by employing omnibus research. Omnibus research allows you to do fast, lean, regionally representative research at a fraction of the cost of custom studies. How fast? Omnibus research allows for you to submit research questions and receive actionable data and insight back in just a few days. With the Insightrix omnibus service, you can begin a research project, put it into field and receive valuable insights back in only 7 days from beginning to end. How affordable? Omnibus research projects field multiple research projects together, all at once, at the same time every month. Combining questions from multiple research projects in a single survey increases government purchasing power by spreading costs across a larger sample. Choose the sample The Insightrix omnibus service, OnTopic™, allows you to choose the geographic location of interest. If you’d like to know about what people in Regina or Saskatoon feel about a specific topic to validate initiatives against the opinions and beliefs of those regions or against those of rural or northern demographics, OnTopic can accommodate. OnTopic allows for sample to be taken from either Saskatoon, Regina, southern Saskatchewan, northern Saskatchewan, or just one of these places - or all at once for the whole province. We set age, gender and region quotas to ensure the sample is representative of the area of interest. If you are a government decision maker in Manitoba, we’ve got you covered too. Insightrix OnTopic gets you regionally representative sample that is either specific to Winnipeg or province wide. How you use omnibus research is up to you. Are you interested in using omnibus research? The Insightrix omnibus service, OnTopic, is just an email or phone call away. Our experienced researchers and analysts are here to consult with you on the formulation of research questions, to put them into field and to assist in making the most out of the results. We run OnTopic once every month in Saskatchewan on the first Friday of every month, and we provide detailed tables that contain useful, actionable insights only a week later on the following Friday. We also do follow the same process in Manitoba, on the following week. Get the intelligence you need for a fraction of the cost of custom research projects.   ...
 

Seven in ten social media users in Saskatchewan have witnessed racial/ethnic bigotry on social media. In a new independent poll conducted by Insightrix Research Inc., Saskatchewan residents were asked how social media has impacted their lives. Sixty percent (60%) of Saskatchewan social media users indicated it had both a positive and negative impact on their lives. Another 14% felt it didn’t change their lives, 11% indicated it had positively impacted their lives, 6% indicated it had negatively impacted their lives, 4% said they never use social media, 2% were unsure and 3% have quit using social media altogether. Despite indicating social media has had some positive impact on their lives, more than one third (34%) feel the behaviour of others on social media has negatively impacted their lives. In fact, 59% of Saskatchewan social media users feel social media has led them to have a more negative view of society. Another 22% indicate it has had no impact on how they view society while only 7% thought it has led to a more positive view of society. Another 12% indicate they are not sure.  In what way has social media changed the way you view society as a whole? (% of SK Social Media Users) Men (65%), compared to women (53%), are more likely to indicate social media has led them to have a more negative view of society, as are those aged 18 to 34  (64%) and 35 to 54 (63%). Older Saskatchewan social media users aged 55 or older were more likely to indicate social media has no impact on how they view society (30%). Witnessing Online Harassment These negative perceptions are likely influenced by having witnessed someone being harassed on social media. Overall, more than half (55%) of Saskatchewan social media users indicate they have seen someone, other than themselves, harassed on social media. This number is higher among those aged 18 to 34 years old (76%) and 35 to 54 years old (59%). When asked what types of harassment they have witnessed others experience on social media, more than two thirds (70%) report witnessing racial harassment, 59% report harassment based on political affiliation, 59% report sexist/gender-based harassment, 57% report body shaming, 56% report religious intolerance, 55% report threats or intimidation and more than one half (51%) report witnessing homophobic/sexuality-based harassment on social media.* What forms of harassment have you witnessed  while you have been on social media? (% of SK Social Media Users) Those Saskatchewan social media users aged 18-34 years old are more likely to report having witnessed revenge porn (15%), harassment of disabled persons (40%), impersonation/catfishing (36%) and sexist/gender-based harassment (68%). Those with children in the household are more likely to indicate they have witnessed threats and intimidation (61%) on social media. Victims of Harassment Two in ten (21%) Saskatchewan social media users report having once been a victim of harassment on social media. Those aged 18 to 34 years old (36%) and those of indigenous ancestry (32%) are more likely to indicate they have been a victim of harassment on social media.  When asked what types of harassment they have experienced, 47% of Saskatchewan social media users indicate threats and intimidation, 34% indicate body shaming, 28% indicate sexist/gender-based harassment and 24% indicate harassment based on political affiliation.* *Respondents were given the option to make multiple selections; therefore, percentages total more than 100%. Potential for Discontinuation The negative impact of social media appears to be taking a toll on Saskatchewan social media users, with one third (34%) indicating harassment on social media has made them at one time want to discontinue the use of one or more forms of social media altogether. Another 9% of Saskatchewan users indicate they have already discontinued at least one form, and 57% indicate they do not plan discontinue. Research Details A total of 804 randomly selected SaskWatch Research® panel members participated in the online research study between February 5 to February 8, 2018. Quotas were set by age, gender and region to match the general population of the province; therefore, the data did not need to be weighted.  Since the research is conducted online, it is considered to be a non-probability proportion sample; therefore, margins of error are not applicable. However, the margin of error can be estimated to be ±3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20 for questions answered by all respondents (n=804). Detailed information on this release is available upon request.  About SaskWatch Research® Insightrix began developing its SaskWatch Research online market research panel in October 2007, using high quality techniques including telephone recruitment and referrals from existing panel members. Presently, there are over 18,000 active panel members representing all regions of the province and distributions of the general population. Panel membership closely matches the 2016 Census, based on age, gender, household composition, household income and education. For more information, please visit http://saskwatch.ca.  ...
 

Winter in Winnipeg is no joke. You don’t earn the nickname, Winterpeg, for nothing after all. Around this time of year, it’s not uncommon to hear friends and family complain about the winter taking a toll both physically and mentally. To combat these winter blahs, many cities and their residents work hard to create a positive winter culture. Insightrix wanted to know how the City of Winnipeg and its residents created a winter culture all their own - like how do they spend their time outdoors during the winter, how cold is just too darned cold and what else could be done to promote a positive winter culture in Winnipeg. We surveyed 360 residents of Winnipeg between February 12 and 15 using ManitobaWatch®  - the Insightrix online research panel in Manitoba. ManitobaWatch sample quotas are set by age, gender and region to match the general population of the province, and since the research is conducted online, it is considered to be a non-probability proportion sample. Therefore, margins of error are not applicable. This is what we learned...
 

NEWS RELEASE: JANUARY 22, 2018 A new independent poll conducted by Insightrix Research® in partnership with CJME and CKOM highlights a tight race for the top chair in the Saskatchewan Party, and the new premier of Saskatchewan. Between January 9 and 17, 2018, we conducted an online poll with 1,004 randomly selected Saskatchewan residents from our SaskWatch Research® online panel. Out of these 1,004 respondents, 72 report being a Saskatchewan Party member. To increase the accuracy of our results among Sask. Party members, we conducted additional surveys, targeting only Sask. Party members. This resulted in a total of 104 Sask. Party members in our study. Note that in select cases numbers do not add precisely to 100% due to rounding. Who Would Make the Best Premier? When asked which of the five leadership candidates would make the best premier, a large portion of Saskatchewan residents are unsure (48%).  Ken Cheveldayoff emerges in the lead, but only 16% of Saskatchewan residents name him as the best choice.  Alanna Koch follows at 9%, with Gord Wyant and Scott Moe each garnering 5% of Saskatchewan resident responses and Tina Beaudry-Mellor just behind at 4%.  One in ten (12%) believe none of the candidates would make the best premier of Saskatchewan. Of note, among the 104 Sask. Party members polled within our general public survey, the findings differ somewhat.  Specifically, equal proportions believe Ms. Koch (22%) and Mr. Cheveldayoff (21%) would make the best premier.  Mr. Moe (13%) and Mr. Wyant (12%) earn roughly equal support and Ms. Beaudry-Mellor trails behind at 3%.  A sizable proportion of Sask. Party members (27%) are unsure which candidate would fit the job best and the remaining 3% feel none of the candidates would be the best as premier.   Saskatchewan Residents (n=1,004) Sask. Party Members (n=104)   Likelihood of Voting for the Sask. Party in the Next General Election Dependent on Leader Residents were next asked how likely they would be to vote for the Sask. Party in the next general election if each of the candidates were premier.  At this point in time, a large proportion state they are uncertain whether they would be more or less likely to vote for the Sask. Party regardless of who is selected as leader (roughly 50%).  However, a greater proportion say they are less likely to vote for the Sask. Party in the next general election regardless of who is leader of the party. This suggests that whoever becomes leader must prove themselves over the coming years to perform well in the next general election. *Calculated by taking the % of much more and somewhat more likely minus % somewhat or much less likely (example: Mr. Cheveldayoff: 11% + 13% - 9% - 19% = -4) Voter Intent - Sask. Party Members* Of the 104 survey respondents who report being a Sask. Party member, voter intentions vary slightly from public opinion on who is believed to be the best premier.  Out of the 104 Sask. Party members, 77 say they intend to vote (or have already voted) and have decided on their candidate selections. In the first round of candidate selections, it appears a fair amount of vote splitting may take place.  Specifically, Mr. Cheveldayoff and Ms. Koch are statistically tied with the most votes in our poll, yet Mr. Moe and Mr. Wyant also earn very similar vote counts to each other in the first round.  Ms. Beaudry-Mellor trails notably behind.  This means second choice candidate selection will likely be important in determining final voter outcomes.  Directionally, our poll suggests comparatively fewer Sask. Party members intend to vote for Mr. Cheveldayoff as their second choice, potentially limiting his impact in gaining momentum in each subsequent round of the voting process. *Caution is advised in interpreting the above findings due to the small sample size and larger margins of errors.  The estimated margin of error on “first choice” is ±11.2 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.  As such, these findings should be considered directional in nature, and actual voter outcomes could differ notably. Research Details A total of 1,004 randomly selected SaskWatch Research® panel members participated in the online research study between January 9th and 17th, 2018. Quotas were set by age, gender and region to match the general population of the province and as such the data did not need to be weighted. An additional 32 surveys were completed, targeting only Sask. Party members to boost the sample size to 104 for questions related to Sask. Party member voting intentions. Since the research is conducted online, it is considered to be a non-probability proportion sample; therefore, margins of error are not applicable. However, had a probability sample been utilized, the margin of error would be estimated to be ±3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20 for questions answered by all respondents (n=1,004). The margin of error on voter intentions among Sask. Party members would be estimated to be ±9.6 percentage points, 19 times out of 20. About SaskWatch Research Insightrix began developing its SaskWatch Research online market research panel in October 2007, using high quality techniques including telephone recruitment and referrals from existing panel members. Presently, there are over 18,000 active panel members representing all regions of the province and distributions of the general population. Panel membership closely matches the 2016 Census, based on age, gender, household composition, household income and education.  http://saskwatch.ca About Insightrix Insightrix is a dynamic, Western Canadian, full-service market research company. It exists to serve businesses and government entities with insights-driven research solutions, and interpretive analysis through leading-edge tools and senior-level expertise across a broad range of industries. Insightrix is based in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. For a PDF version of this release click here. For full details click here. For more information, please contact: Lang McGilp, Research Director Insightrix Research Inc. Tel: 306.290.9599 Email: lang.mcgilp@insightrix.com Web: www.insightrix.com...
 

Most Manitoba residents (88%) intend to buy gifts during the 2017 holiday shopping season.   FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: December 21, 2017   In a recent independent poll by Insightrix Research Inc., 88% of Manitoba residents reported they intend to purchase gifts this holiday season. During this holiday season, 90% of women polled state they intend to purchase gifts, as do 87% of men. Ninety-seven percent (97%) of Manitobans with one or more children stated they intend to purchase gifts this holiday season, as do 82% of those polled with no children.   When will Manitobans be doing most of their holiday shopping?   When it comes to when Manitobans intend to do most of their holiday shopping, almost half (47%) of those polled stated they had already completed their shopping. Almost 2 in 10 (19%) state they plan on doing their shopping between December 16-20, while 13% plan on getting it done by the middle of the month (December 1-15). More than one in ten (11%) of those polled plan on putting it off until the last minute, doing their shopping in the last week before Christmas, and 7% state they plan on doing their holiday shopping after Christmas, during Boxing Week. Another 4% said they were unsure when they’d do their holiday shopping. How much will Manitobans spend over the holidays? When asked how much they plan on spending over the holiday season compared to last year, almost half (49%) of those polled report they plan on spending about the same amount as last year. One quarter (25%) state they plan on spending less than last year, and more than one quarter (27%) state they plan on spending more. How will they pay for it all?   How Manitobans plan on paying for their holiday purchases was another question we asked. A larger proportion of those polled (50%) reported they plan on making their holiday purchases with a major credit card, and almost four in ten (37%) state they will be relying on cash put aside specifically to pay for holiday shopping. Two in ten (20%) of those we polled state they plan on using discretionary income to shop over the holidays, while 16% report they will dip into their savings. Nearly 1 in 10 (8%) state they plan on delaying payment of bills, and another 8% plan on using gift cards. Seven percent (7%) of polled residents state they intend to use a store credit card, and 4% will be relying on other means to make their holiday purchases. *Note that respondents could have provided more than one response which is why the following numbers add to more than 100%. Research Details A total of 603 randomly selected Manitoba Watch Research® panel members participated in the online research study on December 12 through December 14, 2017. Quotas were set by age, gender and region to match the general population of the province. Since the research is conducted online, it is considered to be a non-probability proportion sample; therefore, margins of error are not applicable. About Insightrix Founded in 2001, Insightrix Research Inc. is a full-service market research firm that helps clients develop, administer, and manage data collection and information strategies. From its office in Saskatoon, Insightrix offers a comprehensive range of research services. For more information, please visit our website. For more information, please contact: Duncan McGregor, Marketing & Communications Coordinator Insightrix Research Inc. Tel: 306.657.5640 ext. 240...
 

Most Saskatchewan residents (93%) intend to buy gifts during the 2017 holiday shopping season. FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: December 21, 2017   In a recent independent poll by Insightrix Research Inc., 93% of Saskatchewan residents reported they intend to purchase gifts this holiday season. During this holiday season, 95% of women polled state they intend to purchase gifts, as do 90% of men. Ninety-five percent (95%) of residents between the age of 35-54 years state they intend to buy gifts, while a lower number (89%) of those over the age of 55 years report the same.   When will Sask. residents be doing most of their holiday shopping?   When it comes to when residents of Saskatchewan intend to do most of their holiday shopping, half the respondents (50%) had already purchased most of their gifts, and other 14% planned to do by middle of December (1st to the 15th). Almost a quarter (22%) plan to purchase most of their gifts in the latter half of December (16th to 20th) and 10% plan to do so in the last few days before Christmas (21st to 24th). Another 2% of residents plan to purchase most of their gifts during boxing week and 2% were not sure when they would get most of their gifts.   How much will residents spend over the holidays? When asked how much they plan on spending over the holiday season compared to last year, more than half (56%) of those polled report they plan on spending about the same amount as last year. Almost one quarter (24%) state they plan on spending less than last year, and two in ten (20%) state they plan on spending more. How will they pay for it all?   How Saskatchewan residents plan on paying for their holiday purchases was another question we asked. A larger proportion of those polled (46%) reported they plan on making their holiday purchases with a major credit card, and almost four in ten (37%) state they will be relying on cash put aside specifically to pay for holiday shopping. Nearly one quarter (24%) of those we polled state they plan on using discretionary income to shop over the holidays, while 17% report they will dip into their savings. Nearly 1 in 10 (8%) state they plan on delaying payment of bills, and 4% plan on using gift cards. Three percent (3%) of polled residents state they intend to use a store credit card, and 7% will be relying on other means to make their holiday purchases. *Note that respondents could have provided more than one response which is why the following numbers add to more than 100%. Research Details A total of 801 randomly selected SaskWatch Research® panel members participated in the online research study on December 12 through December 14, 2017. Quotas were set by age, gender and region to match the general population of the province. Since the research is conducted online, it is considered to be a non-probability proportion sample: therefore, margins of error are not applicable.  About SaskWatch Research Insightrix began developing its SaskWatch Research® online market research panel in October 2007, using high quality techniques, including telephone recruitment and referrals from existing panel members. Presently, there are over 15,500 active panel members representing all regions of the province and distributions of the general population. The panel membership closely matches the 2011 Census based on age, gender, household composition, household income and education. For more information, please visit SaskWatch.ca.  About Insightrix Insightrix is a dynamic, Western Canadian, full-service market research company. It exists to serve businesses and government entities with insights-driven research solutions, and interpretive analysis through leading-edge tools and senior-level expertise across a broad range of industries. Insightrix is based in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. For more information, please visit our website. For more information, please contact Duncan McGregor, Marketing & Communications Coordinator Insightrix Research Inc. Tel: 306.657.5640 ext. 240...