Living in the shoes of your research participants is a good way to learn about them. At least, that is the general thinking around the research methodology of ethnography. In its roots in the social sciences, this was very much how ethnographic research was performed – by living with and observing a person or a group to get a deeper qualitative understanding of who they are and what they are all about. Ethnography is performed a little differently in a market research context – though it can still involve a great deal of direct observation, as well as interviews and discussions, often through one-on-one interviews, video or written diaries and other forms of qualitative research. What makes this type of research ethnographic is that the research takes place in context with the research problem – such as where the participant buys or tries a product, or where an issue may arise for example. Ethnographic research, in most cases, will produce research findings that cut to the core of the “why” or “how” of a thing, perception, process, etc. by providing deep and complex behavioral data based on participants’ actions and behaviours that can be used for all manner of applications in a business sense. Ultimately, there is a business case for ethnographic research any time an organization wants to know more about consumers in terms of lifestyle factors, attitudes, cultural trends and how context affects selection, usage, perceptions or attitudes. How Could an Organization Use Ethnographic Research Effectively? One case for ethnography is to learn how a person or group will respond to a new product or system and actually employ it in their real, daily lives. Let's say your organization is a large department store, for example, and you want to test a new system that would allow your customers to perform their own price checks without the assistance of store staff. You could ask a great number of existing customers what they would like to get out of your price-check system and how they would like to use it. However, since very few if any will have given the question a great deal of thought in their daily lives, the answers they provide may not result in the best system being prototyped and released for mass distribution to your stores. Rather, in this case, it may be better to develop a few prototypes and put them into your stores to observe how your customers are actually engaging with them. Combined with short intercept interviews about their experiences, ethnography research on how your customers negotiate your new system can answer some very important questions: Can your customers use the system without any training? Where were they showing signs of frustration? When were they succeeding? How did the system work best or worst from the customers’ perspective? Armed with this data, you can feel secure that the system your store ends up developing based on the behaviour of your actual customers will meet your customers’ needs best. This is just one example of where an ethnographic study could successfully produce actionable data. However, developing prototypes is only one application of ethnography in market research – it can also be used in almost any situation in which one wishes to know the “how” and “why” a person or a group of individuals does what they do. If you have a great qualitative understanding of these things, the business applications for that data are almost limitless. Ethnographic Research at Insightrix In the summer of 2020, Insightrix wanted to provide select members of our SaskWatch Research® online market research community the opportunity to engage on how they were adjusting to life during the COVID-19 pandemic. We recruited residents to participate in a two-week diary using the FocusVision Revelation platform that included discussion boards, posting videos and images and more, using an ethnography methodology. Participants were asked to engage in a number of activities relating to different subject areas of their daily lives in the study. These subjects included media consumption habits, adjusting to a new elements of daily life interaction like social distancing and experiences with homeschooling and more. The results of this study can be found in our report, Adjusting to the New Normal: A Two-Week Ethnography Study of Saskatchewan Residents. Would you like to know more? Adjusting to the New Normal: A Two-Week Ethnography Study of Saskatchewan Residents answers questions around how residents of Saskatchewan were coping during the early months of the pandemic. It explores their fears and their hopes for the future, how they have worked to adapt and change in their new environment, why they have made the changes they have made and more. Please contact us for more information if you would like to know more about this insightful ethnographic report. ...
 

Insightrix infographics are a memorable, engaging and flexible way to communicate research data These days, data is everywhere. We get it from our televisions, our computers, our phones, our smartwatches and fitness bands – data is ubiquitous. All that data has one thing in common – it must be communicated in a way that can be readily understood, and if necessary, acted upon in ways that achieve results. But data can be hard to consume without visual aids like dashboards or charts and graphs. In fact, most of us would like to know the gist of what the data is saying - because not everyone gets excited about correlation or predictions. We fitness wearable users crave a clean, easy-to-read dashboard. Would Fitbit have succeeded without one? Maybe so, but...
 

Using qualitative approaches is nothing new in research. It is often applied to help strengthen quantitative approaches to give answers to questions that cannot always be obtained by measurements alone. Qualitative research – as a broad approach – often employs in-person focus groups, in-person interviews or online survey open-end text boxes to tap into a respondent’s thoughts, feelings, attitudes and behaviours. Insightrix has been collecting qualitative data for years – and we’ve directly benefited from using these approaches to enrich survey data. Using qualitative data in online surveys can be engaging (and, dare I say… sometimes fun?) for respondents, while research groups find it easy and rewarding to support quantitative data - and that can be a game changer in presentations to your board members. In the past, Insightrix has employed qualitative tools for many exciting projects with partners and clients. We’ve used qualitative methods like: Observational research – like ethnography – and we have been served well by using this approach. Market research online communities (MROCs) – using MROCs in select research projects allows for much larger participant groups and exciting opportunities for survey design. Open-ended text questions on online surveys – these can be fun for participants and can really help provide researchers with a more complete picture Focus groups - we even travel across the nation to facilitate focus groups. Yes… still. In-depth interviews - for many consulting projects that require explicit details from participants, IDIs are essential. But what do all these approaches have in common? They require human intervention, human coding – and time. Yes, qualitative research takes time to dig into. It’s a way to uncover more about a subject rather than determining the research narrative by crunching the numbers. But when insights are wanted quickly and are expected to come with depth – are these qualitative methodologies the best approach to get the whole story? That depends. By using these approaches, will it take the research team time and effort to develop the insights? Absolutely. We know that, going into a new decade, our research participants are changing – they expect quick survey experiences, they appreciate best-in-class user design and have more immediate distractions than ever before. So, if our clients’ demands are changing and survey participants’ experiences are evolving rapidly – shouldn’t market research be innovating qualitative approaches at the same pace? Here are three ways to optimize your next qualitative research project that will appease both your research participants, as well as your clients:   Find a unique way to tell the story through another person’s lens. For example, if you are an ice cream producer who is curious about the visibility of your packaging in a specific chain superstore you operate in – you may want to conduct market research to find out what is most visible to your customers and who frequents these chain stores of interest. Your business would then work with a research team who may use an ethnography approach to answer this research question about your product and its visibility in stores. Ethnography would allow the research team to find participants who have purchased the ice cream in the past 12 months and those who frequent the chain store. The participant/ice cream connoisseur may be tasked with a research scenario that employs video response using an application to help the respondent tell their experience in their own words. The brand could follow up by asking about a competitor’s visibility and how it compares to your own. You could even have the participant travel to other locations to explore the same research question. While the incentive would have to outweigh the work involved for the participant, the research team would be able to gather rich qualitative data which the ice cream brand could then include in their next product packaging or distribution decisions. Let video responses tell a larger-than-life story for consumer research. Video is one of the most effective ways to provide a short survey experience for your participant. Not only does it provide the opportunity to see through the eyes of the consumer – it allows for rich storytelling that can bring life to research findings. Take Vox Pops – they are a fly-on-the-wall video research approach that are quick and cost effective, and they allow us to share market research information while gaining hot topic insights from the general population. Insightrix uses Vox Pop video research for consumer-curated content that gives greater engagement and deeper interaction with our brand. It gives us an opportunity to share video research with the general population who may be interested in the topics discussed while exploring the insights of the gen pop through video that is digestible for social media audiences. Vox Pops are quick and easy to turn around – avoiding the time a qualitative survey would take to set up. A short and informal interview can be a great way to simplify collecting public opinion that can be applied to many business needs – like marketing! We have recently done Vox Pops on subjects like quality of life, opinion on professional sports, holiday shopping and purchase habits – and even favourite beer brands! These Vox Pops can be done in 48 hours from question to completion. Use a video response tool to gain insights into your target market’s desires and expectations. One easy and cost-effective way to improve qualitative research online is the inclusion of video responses. Video responses can assess attitudes or immediate reactions associated with a question. Survey participants are more likely to elicit feedback and give the researcher more diverse data to evaluate. Video responses provide the participant the opportunity to answer authentically because they are in a comfortable setting using one-way communication – instead of driving to a strange facility or sitting on the other line of a one-on-one interview, answering thoughtful questions. This approach can provide video reels that capture multiple respondents’ answers and allow clients and stakeholders to view responses from the consumers themselves. Video insights are deeper than an open-end at the end of a market research survey – they provide an opportunity for the survey participant to tell an authentic story, they let the researcher ask for a unique answer and they give video research data that can be applied to internal stakeholder presentations that provide more depth than any well-designed PowerPoint slide. Video response questions can be applied in ad hoc market research projects – they require very little work to include in an online survey and provide a value add to any quantitative research project. Without being intrusive, video questions can be easily opted out of and the same question can be applied in other methods, so as not to lose data, and not have to re-involve your participants either. We do not require video responses to be mandatory, and we know the response rate is important. An extra (small) incentive to provide a video response is important – but so is the question you ask! Make the survey experience is rewarding and don’t ask a question that can be effortlessly typed out in a text box or that will create any bias. Ask a question that allows the respondent to share a story. Ask about an experience or get feedback on something they have just been shown – like a new logo or new product packaging. Video responses are a great storytelling solution for your survey that will both enrich your qualitative data while providing the top of mind feedback that can take your research report to the next level.   ...
 

Two thirds of Saskatchewan residents support the provincial government taking legal action against the federal government in regard to the Carbon Tax. For Immediate Release: March 28, 2019 In a new independent poll conducted by Insightrix Research, Inc., residents were asked whether they support or oppose the Saskatchewan government in taking legal action against the federal government in regard to the federal Greenhouse Gas Pollution Pricing Act (i.e., the carbon tax). Results from this independent survey indicate that one half (51%) of residents strongly support this stance and another 16% somewhat support it. A majority of residents within all age ranges support the provincial government although support rises with age (18-34: 60% support, 35-54: 69% support and 55+: 72% support).  Support is lower in Regina (53%) and Saskatoon (57%) than in the remainder of the province (76%). Most of those who support the legal action most commonly believe the Act will result in price increases, have minimal benefit to reducing pollution, be harmful to the provincial economy and simply be one more tax.  One half say they do not support the Act because they believe the federal government does not have the right or jurisdiction to impose such a tax.  Findings are uniform across demographic variables. Among the 22% who oppose the provincial government stance, most feel the Act will limit environmental impacts caused by industry, while one half feel it would limit impacts caused by consumers, it would be beneficial to the provincial economy or simply feel the federal government has the right to impose such a tax. *** Research Details A total of 801 randomly selected SaskWatch Research® panel members participated in the online research study between March 5 and 7, 2019. Quotas were set by age, gender and region to match the general population of the province and as such the data did not need to be weighted.  Since the research is conducted online, it is considered to be a non-probability proportion sample; therefore, margins of error are not applicable.  However, the margin of error can be estimated to be ±3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20 for questions answered by all respondents.  About SaskWatch Research® Insightrix began developing its SaskWatch Research online market research panel in 2007, using high quality techniques including telephone recruitment and referrals from existing panel members. Presently, there are over 18,500 active panel members representing all regions of the province and distributions of the general population. Panel membership closely matches the 2016 Census, based on age, gender, household composition, household income and education. For more information, please visit http://saskwatch.ca. About Insightrix Insightrix is a dynamic, Saskatchewan-based, full-service market research company. It serves businesses and government entities with insights-driven research solutions, and interpretive analysis through leading-edge tools and senior-level expertise across a broad range of industries. Insightrix is based in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. For complete details visit:  https://insightrix.com/market-research-industry-blog/.   For more information, please contact: Lang McGilp, Research Director Insightrix Research Inc. Tel: 306.290.9599 Email: lang.mcgilp@insightrix.com Web: www.insightrix.com...
 

Over the past year, we've introduced new business programs, launched eCommerce accessible reports and worked for our ISO 27001 certification. We've also made several upgrades to our physical space and got up to all kinds of initiatives and events that made the year really fly by. We figured we would share a synopsis of 2018 as we saw it - feel free to scan through the Insightrix 2018 Year in Review. ISO Certification Throughout 2018, Insightrix Research invested a great deal of capital and worked tirelessly with the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) in pursuit of obtaining ISO 27001 certification. And we are only months away from completing the process. This international certification means Insightrix will distinguish itself as having some of the most stringent information security management systems (ISMS) available anywhere. ISO 27001 certification goes beyond regular IT and data management security. It covers all aspects of information security and data management in our organization. Whether it is raw data, paperwork or even the physical space of the Insightrix offices, ISO 27001 certification means our clients can be assured their data and information is safe and protected. Securing ISO 27001 certification in 2019 will bring Insightrix ISMS closely in line with recent EU GDPR requirements and will set Insightrix apart in the national and international marketplace as a leader in information asset and data security. Insightrix AdCheck Launched Early in 2018 In early 2018, we launched Insightrix AdCheck – a new and innovative way of pre-testing advertisement creative. Suitable for individual ads or multi-media campaigns, AdCheck is the most comprehensive tool for assessing, predicting and optimizing the performance of advertising copy and creative. Insightrix AdCheck is a quantitative pre-testing solution that uses standardized copy-testing measures based on a battery of questions. With AdCheck, we can help execute ad testing projects quickly and build industry norms - all with metrics that are both easy to understand and to act on. eCommerce and Syndicated Reporting 2018 In April 2018, we added an eCommerce  storefront to the Insightrix website. Now, clients and those interested in purchasing our syndicated reports can conveniently access them directly though the website powered by Stripe. The 2018 Saskatchewan Social Media Report offers in-depth and representative analysis of social media habits and perceptions across devices and platforms. The Saskatchewan Media Democracy Report digs into device usage behaviours, media consumption habits, views on advertising, the online shopping behaviours of Saskatchewan residents and more. Both reports are quickly becoming recognized as an indispensable tool for targeted marketing intelligence in the Saskatchewan marketplace. New Features to SaskWatch Research in 2018 We've strengthened our already robust SaskWatch Research® member profiling system. We’ve added more and even deeper categories to ensure our clients get to consult the niche groups they need to engage with most. We’ve added specific profile categories and subcategories. These speak to general interests and spending habits, residency and newcomer status, specific occupations and distinct sub-fields of employment or activity and a whole lot more. By adding these categories, we can probe even deeper and be incredibly specific to choose the exact participants you need for your study. This provides actionable research that speaks precisely to your unique question. With these changes, we continue to provide the most accurate and relevant market intelligence about Saskatchewan possible. Continuous Development in Insightrix Communities 2018 was a year of team effort and client partnership at Insightrix Communities. As part of our commitment to providing the best customer service available, we’ve worked with our clients to develop a user experience that is second to none for the Insightrix Communities software – the only all-inclusive market research online community (MROC) platform available. By adopting an international focus in 2018 and through consultation with existing and prospective clients, we’ve tailored our MROC to be the most robust and worry-free online panel anywhere. Office & Focus Group Facility Upgrades In early 2018, Insightrix implemented several office upgrades and enhancements to amenities in our focus group rental facilities and meeting rooms, including connectivity and multimedia display capabilities. With these upgrades now in place, Insightrix is now able to offer the highest-quality focus group spaces available in the province. Podcasts & Publications Stories of Market Research: The Insightrix Podcast got its legs under it in 2018 and really hit its stride. What follows are the episodes of Stories of Market Research: The Insightrix Podcast we produced in 2018. Episode 3: Market Research & the Customer Experience In this episode of the podcast, we were joined by voice of market consultant and customer experience guru, John Morton, to discuss how customer experience is evaluated, why companies are focusing on this more and more lately and how market research can be used to make buyers’ journeys remarkable… Episode 4: Market Research & the World of Marketing In Episode 4, we were joined by President of the Saskatchewan Professional Marketers Assoc. and Manager of Marketing and Communications at the United Way of Saskatoon and Area (and local marketing wiz), Paige Gignac, to discuss the ways marketing professionals benefit from market research and her perspective on the place of market research in relation to the world of marketing… Episode 5: Careers in Market Research In this special episode of the podcast, we spoke with some of the younger researchers at Insightrix to get their unique perspectives on their careers. We discovered what led them to pursue careers as market research professionals and learn a few tricks and tips for those new to the field. The episode also features an interview with Insightrix Research Director, Lang McGilp, about the skills, abilities and background he looks for in researchers. This episode is a must-listen for anyone considering a career in market research...
 

Recently, Insightrix Research independently ran a survey from November 26 to December 3, 2018, to find out more about whether the stockings in Saskatchewan were hung by the chimney with care, in hopes that St. Nicholas soon would be there. Residents share their insights on their holiday purchase intentions, including how much they plan to spend, where they plan to purchase gifts and their online holiday shopping behaviours in 2018. Of those surveyed… 93% of Saskatchewan residents say they plan to purchase holiday gifts this year. And as the prairie children were all nestled snug in their beds, some seniors and grandparents (55+) decided they did not want to bend. “Purchase gifts?” they said, with a big hefty sigh...
 

For Immediate Release: December 7, 2018 In an independent poll conducted by Insightrix Research Inc., more than 2,400 Saskatchewan residents were asked over a period of three months (September, October, November 2018) about their plans to shop in the upcoming holiday season. Procrastination changes our perceptions! Our perceptions of when to do holiday shopping shift as the holiday season grows closer A majority of residents believe holiday shopping before Thanksgiving is too early, although this opinion decreases as the holiday season approaches (61% in September as compared to 50% in November). Similarly, fifty-three per cent (53%) say holiday shopping before Remembrance Day is too early in September, versus the forty-six per cent (46%) who believe it is too early in November. Only three in ten residents believe shopping before Black Friday (November 23) is too early, and close to one in ten say before Christmas Eve is too early to start their holiday shopping. What is interesting, though, is that women and younger residents are generally more likely to agree it is fine to do holiday shopping earlier in the year We have many residents shopping year-round! A slim majority of Saskatchewan residents (55%) agree that they do their holiday throughout the year.   A majority of residents plan to try to spend $500 or less on their gifts Overall, 57% say they intend to spend $500 or less in total holiday shopping this year. Unlike their thoughts about what date is too soon to start holiday shopping, Saskatchewan residents' holiday spending plans don't change much as the holidays draw nearer. Compared to last year, most residents (70%) plan to spend about the same amount. Twelve per cent (12%) say they plan to spend more, while 18% say they plan to spend less than last year. In general, Saskatchewan women and older residents (55 years of age and older) are more likely to say they plan to spend less than last year on holiday shopping. Of those who plan to spend more than they did last year, 40% say they plan to spend more than $250 compared to last year. Of those who say they plan to spend less than last year, 66% say they plan to spend between $1 - $250 less than they did last year. We are in the gift buying mood!   Most Saskatchewan residents plan to purchase holiday gifts in 2018 Based on data collected over the three-month research period (September, October, November 2018), approximately 94% of residents reported that they intend to purchase gifts this holiday season. Slightly more Saskatchewan women (96%) say they intend to purchase gifts than do men (92%) in 2018.   *** Research Details This research was conducted over the course of three months in three separate studies. A total of 2,406 randomly selected SaskWatch Research® panel members participated in the online research studies from September to November 2018. In September, 805 panellists participated in the study between September 18 and 20, 2018. In October, 800 panellists participated between October 10 and 14, 2018, and 801 participated between November 6 and 9, 2018. Quotas were set by age, gender and region to match the general population of the province. Since the research is conducted online, it is considered to be a non-probability proportion sample: therefore, margins of error are not applicable. About SaskWatch Research© Insightrix began developing its SaskWatch Research® online market research panel in October 2007, using high-quality techniques, including telephone recruitment and referrals from existing panel members. Presently, there are more than 18,000 active panel members representing all regions of the province and distributions of the general population. The panel membership closely matches the 2011 Census based on age, gender, household composition, household income and education. For more information, please visit SaskWatch.ca. About Insightrix Research© Insightrix is a dynamic, Western Canadian, full-service market research company. It exists to serve businesses and government entities with insights-driven research solutions, and interpretive analysis through leading-edge tools and senior-level expertise across a broad range of industries. Insightrix is based in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. For a printer-friendly version of this release, click here. For more information, please contact: Marketing & Communications Coordinator Email: info@insightrix.com Telephone: (306)657-5640 Ext. 240...
 

How will Saskatchewan residents be celebrating Thanksgiving this year?   For the most part, most of Saskatchewan will be celebrating Thanksgiving 2018! We ran an OnTopic® survey between September 17 – 20, 2018, with members of our SaskWatch Research® online panel in all parts of Saskatchewan to find out how residents of the province plan on spending their Thanksgiving 2018. We found out that most residents of the province (87%) plan to celebrate Thanksgiving in some way. We also learned that more women (90%) than men (84%) are planning to celebrate the holiday. Age seems to have some bearing on Thanksgiving plans, as well. Interestingly, more young residents are planning to celebrate Thanksgiving in 2018 than older residents of the province. Nine out of ten (90%) residents aged between 18 – 34 years old stated they plan to celebrate their reasons for being thankful – a full 7% more than those aged 55 years and older (83%). Less statistically significant, but still worth noting, 89% of those aged 35 – 54 reported they also plan to celebrate a Canadian Thanksgiving in 2018. How will Saskatchewan residents celebrate Thanksgiving 2018? By a great margin, it turns out that Sask. residents really enjoy eating with their loved ones over Thanksgiving. More than nine out of ten (94%) respondents who said they planned on celebrating Thanksgiving in 2018 reported that having a meal at home with friends and/or family was the way they plan on celebrating the holiday in 2018. While Thanksgiving dinner was by far the most popular planned activity in 2018, Sask. residents who said they plan on celebrating the holiday also said they plan to watch football (17%), decorate their homes (15%) or enjoy a meal out at a restaurant with friends and/or family (5%). Only 4% of those who plan on celebrating this year said they plan on decorating their places of work, 3% said they had other plans entirely – and 2% said they plan on enjoying the holiday all alone. What will Saskatchewan residents eat for Thanksgiving 2018? Now that we know that eating with friends and/or family is on everyone’s mind this year, let’s look at what Saskatchewan residents who plan on celebrating the holiday will be sitting down to at Thanksgiving dinner in 2018. Not surprising was that 85% of them stated they plan to go back to that tried and true Thanksgiving champion – turkey - for Thanksgiving dinner. This may be a case of not fixing what isn’t broken, as many of those reliable Thanksgiving dinner sides were also mentioned. Seventy-six percent (76%) stated they plan on enjoying some stuffing for dinner, 74% said they were looking forward to having gravy and 74% said they want to get some mashed potatoes in, as well. Pumpkin pie is looked forward to by 71%, and 45% anticipate cranberry sauce in their future. Dinner rolls are also looking like a popular choice (43%) and almost four in ten (39%) plan to partake in some ham rather than the more popular Thanksgiving turkey. Apple pie is once again dominated by the choice for its rival, pumpkin pie – only 29% of those who plan on celebrating Thanksgiving plan to eat it this year. Sweet potatoes are something that one quarter (25%) look forward to, 8% plan to eat wild game and only 2% are planning to choose fish for Thanksgiving dinner. More than one in ten (11%) of those who plan to celebrate Thanksgiving plan to eat something else entirely. Check out the word cloud below for some of these Thanksgiving dinner choices (responses depicted larger were more popular and smaller ones were less popular).  Thanksgiving dinner continues to be a big deal in Saskatchewan It looks like Thanksgiving remains something that many Saskatchewan residents look forward to and plan for – and younger residents seem to be embracing the holiday more than their older counterparts. Thanksgiving dinner is the most popular planned activity to celebrate the holiday by quite a large margin, but Sask. residents also plan to watch football and to decorate their homes.    We also learned that traditional choices beat out more unconventional ones when it comes to Thanksgiving meal planning in Saskatchewan in 2018. Pumpkin pie and turkey are still the people’s champions when it comes to Thanksgiving dinner choices, beating out apple pie and ham by quite a bit. There may be something to not fixing things that aren’t broken after all. To view the full infographic, click here.  Do you want to participate in fun and interesting research like this? You can! Register with SaskWatch Research® today and start participating right away. SaskWatch Research is Saskatchewan’s largest online research community, comprising over 18,000+ Saskatchewan residents from all over the province. When you become a SaskWatch member, you’ll have the opportunity to weigh in on important issues in Saskatchewan, and have your voice heard on concerns related to brands and businesses. ...
 

Multi-channel ad campaigns have their own challenges It doesn’t take a genius to know today’s customer is always connected and that audiences consistently have their finger on the social pulse through social media and the internet. And, let’s face it, getting honest feedback about your company, your product or your advertising can be especially difficult. This is the reality most advertisers are working in today, especially those working in multi-channel campaigns. With the desire to get messages out to as wide an audience as possible, many creative professionals can be quick to launch a multi-channel advertising campaign without putting effort into understanding how the overall message of the campaign is about to be received.  When advertisers (or marketers for that matter) are executing their digital campaigns this way, without employing ad testing methodologies and being unaware of how their messages are going to be received by their audiences, it is usually to be quicker than the other guy, or to avoid the dreaded, “Why did you spend money on that?” These micro-marketing moments can have a major impact on your brand, and if your audience does not respond well to your campaign, the backlash can happen as quickly as a comment on social media can be posted. Not employing creative testing can come at the cost of your brand’s reputation   While marketers and advertisers want to be quick and efficient, what they need is to be credible and relevant. This is even more relevant in multi-channel campaigns, in which messaging can change depending on in what location and on what medium it is being seen, and who the intended audience will be.  There are simple tools that can help deliver customer feedback on your advertising at the same pace your target audience is connecting with you. Feedback tools like advertising testing offer real value when it comes to seeing how your creative will be received, and are a great alternative to the more traditional (*ahem* not-as-quick) forms of evaluation.   What follows are 5 benefits of advertising testing in multi-channel campaigns   1. Find out what will work next time, and the time after, and the time after that… When you put an ad testing methodology to work on your creative, you are benchmarking – gathering data on what works best and what was less successful, what audiences engaged with most, how different channels engage with your advertisement, etc. By testing and adding to benchmarks and established norms about your creative, you will accumulate data on how to create great ads again and again based on what worked best before. 2. Your creative is good – It could be better… Want to turn out creative that will succeed in the audience you intend it to speak to? By testing your ad, you can make sure not only that your messaging is exactly how you intend it, but also that the message speaks exactly to whom you intend it to reach. New developments in methodologies have even made it possible to measure the virality of an ad before it is launched. Sure, the original messaging in the ad may have fallen short at first – but through ad testing, you can be sure to change it up before that creative ever hits the streets. 3. Money! Of course! A terrible ad costs the same to produce as a great one. At least, it can unless ad testing is put in place to catch that bad ad before it sees any large investment. Most of the spend on creatives will happen during the final phase of their production. Ad testing is usually done in the very beginning phases of the creative, using storyboards, animatics and other pre-production materials. Testing at this phase allows for your audience to get an idea of where a creative is going before it gets there, but saving the investment it would take to get that creative all the way finished and presented to them – a potentially sizeable savings.  4. We could all be a little more customer-centric… Providing what your customers want out of your organization is key in today’s marketplace. By employing ad testing with your customer base, you are listening to your customers and possibly co-creating with them. With data about your ads coming directly from your customer base, you can develop creative that speaks directly to them. 5. Protect your company’s reputation! Not employing creative testing can come at the cost of your brand’s reputation. While marketers and advertisers want to be quick and efficient, what they need is to be credible and relevant. Communicating with any audience involves some level of risk. Testing advertisements and their messages can help brands remove some of the risk by showing how messages will be received before they are visible to everyone, allowing for the gauging of opinion or reaction to your creative – potentially saving a brand from harm or embarrassment....
 

Saskatchewan residents are concerned about the Canada/U.S. trade dispute. FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: JULY 20, 2018   In a new independent poll conducted by Insightrix Research Inc., Saskatchewan residents were asked if they are concerned about the U.S./Canada Trade Dispute and how much confidence they have in different leaders to do the right thing regarding world affairs.   Trade Dispute Perceptions Saskatchewan residents were asked which of the following statements reflect how they feel about the Canada-U.S. trade dispute. They could pick more than one statement. One half (50%) feel Canada is being bullied, 45% feel the relationship has been damaged but will repair itself over time and 44% feel they are prouder to be Canadian.  Q5: Which of the following describes how you feel about the trade dispute? Base: All Respondents, (n=805).  Overall, 87% of residents are concerned about U.S. President Donald Trump’s statement that the current U.S. and Canada trade dispute “is going to cost Canadians a lot of money” (note: this question is not graphed in this report but was asked to all respondents, n=805). As a result of the trade dispute, approximately 7 in 10 residents say they are likely to stop buying U.S.-made goods (70%), to stop or reduce travel to the U.S. (70%) and to not purchase goods from U.S. retailers in Canada (67%).  Q4. Because of this trade dispute, how likely are you to… Base: All Respondents, (n=805).   Support for Retaliatory Tariffs In total, two thirds (67%) of Saskatchewan residents support the retaliatory tariffs enacted by the Canadian government. Another 17% did not support the retaliatory tariffs, and 16% were unsure. Q8: Do you support or oppose the retaliatory tariffs enacted by the Canadian government? Base: All Respondents, (n=805).   Confidence in World Leaders Most Saskatchewan residents (80%) indicated they do not have much or any confidence in Donald Trump to do the right thing in word affairs, compared to 72% for Russian President Vladimir Putin. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau also received low ratings, with 61% of Saskatchewan residents having not much or no confidence that he will do the right thing. By contrast, German Chancellor Angela Merkel enjoys fairly high confidence levels, with 50% of Saskatchewan residents indicating they have a lot or some confidence that she will do the right thing regarding world affairs. This is followed by U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May (45%), French President Emmanuel Macron (44%), Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau (38%) and Chinese President Xi Jinping (30%). Q1. Please indicate how much confidence you have in each leader to do the right thing regarding world affairs. Base: All respondents, (n=805). *** Research Details A total of 805 randomly selected SaskWatch Research® panel members participated in the online research study between July 10 and 12, 2018. Surveys were distributed in English language format only. Quotas were set by age, gender and region to match the general population of the province; therefore, the data did not need to be weighted. Specific quotas included the following: The division of North and South are based on the first three digits of postal codes (FSAs) and is indicated by the red line in the map below: Age and Gender Quotas Since the research is conducted online, it is considered to be a non-probability proportion sample; therefore, margins of error are not applicable.  About SaskWatch Research® Insightrix began developing its SaskWatch Research online market research panel in 2007, using high quality techniques including telephone recruitment and referrals from existing panel members. Presently, there are over 18,000 active panel members, representing all regions of the province and distributions of the general population. Panel membership closely matches the 2016 Census, based on age, gender, household composition, household income and education. For more information, please visit: https://insightrix.com/saskwatch-research-online-panel-saskatchewan/ About Insightrix Research Insightrix is a dynamic, Western Canadian, full-service market research company. It exists to serve businesses and government entities with insights-driven research solutions, and interpretive analysis through leading-edge tools and senior-level expertise across a broad range of industries. Insightrix is based in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. For complete details visit:  https://insightrix.com/market-research-industry-blog/ About MRIA Gold Seal Insightrix is a member of the Market Research and Intelligence Association (MRIA) and adheres to the MRIA Code, which contains principles of professional practice in the conduct of our work. Our adherence to the Common Standards of Disclosure is our commitment to the high standard of ethics in our relations with research participants, our clients, the public and the market research industry. For complete details visit: https://mria-arim.ca/ For the complete press release, detailed tables and questionnaire visit here.  For more information, please contact: Insightrix Research Inc. Email: info@insightrix.com  Web: www.insightrix.com...