Different research challenges require various research solutions and knowing when to use a specific approach can certainly be a daunting task. This overview highlights some instances in which online communities may be preferred in place of custom ad hoc research. Combination of Quant and Qual – Online communities offer researchers a solid opportunity to gather both quantitative and qualitative data at the same time and at a lower cost. Because most online community platforms have both quant and qual tools built in, research can be conducted much more quickly and efficiently than a combined qual-quant ad hoc study. Demographic Segments – If you are looking to segment individuals based on demographics, online communities work well. Short surveys are used to profile individuals and then targeted research questions are presented to the entire group to pinpoint where profile differences emerge. Groups can also be formed based on demographics and targeted research can be conducted with specific sub groups. This approach can be achieved much more easily with an online community than with a long ad hoc questionnaire with skip logic that segments groups during the survey. Regional, National, and International Research – If the research question requires insights from individuals who are geographically dispersed, an online community is an excellent research platform. If a wide scope is required, individuals can be recruited from different regions, provinces/states, and countries. Online communities are borderless and research can easily be conducted in several languages. Engaging Research – In place of long and often boring surveys, try utilizing an online community to spice up your research questions and increase engagement. If your research topic is dull in survey form, consider an online community to allow for a more open forum for discussion. The community also allows for innovative approaches such as co-moderation, where a community member or members take an active role in conducting the research. Rather than gathering a lot of yes/no and scale answers, you can collect rich, organic data from engaged members whom you can return to for future research questions....

This white paper provides an introduction to statistical and significance testing in market research and answers the following questions: What does statistical testing mean, how is it shown, and how should it be interpreted? Why are there multiple statistical tests, and how are they different? What do terms like “margin of error” and “nineteen times out of twenty” mean, and how are they relevant? Why is a margin of error not reported in online research?   Most of the time when doing marketing research, there is interest in differences between groups. Demographic groups, groups based on psychographics or attitudes, or any number of other slices and dices may be relevant to the researcher. However, for a non-researcher or a new researcher, entering the world of stat testing and interpretation can be daunting. Sometimes researchers forget that most people don’t look at research results all day, and we often forget that not everyone can eyeball a significant difference!...

A new independent online poll conducted by Insightrix Research suggests that residents are divided on whether or not the new Regina Sewage Treatment plant should follow a traditional Design, Bid and Build (DBB) approach or a Public-Private-Partnership (P3) approach. Awareness of and Following the Debate Awareness of the debate regarding the development of a new sewage treatment plant is widespread. Nearly all Regina residents surveyed (96%) report they are aware of the debate taking place regarding whether or not the City of Regina should use a DBB or P3 approach to building the new sewage treatment plant. Further, 94% are aware that a referendum is being held on September 25th where Regina residents can vote on the issue. Additionally, eight in ten (81%) residents aware of the issue say they are actively following the discussion (22% very closely, 59% somewhat closely) while the remainder (19%) are either not following the issue at all (8%) or are only listening to what their friends or family tell them as the debate unfolds (11%). Support for P3 vs. DBB Respondents were presented with the following brief description of the two approaches: The City of Regina Council unanimously approved using a public-private-partnership (P3) for the sewage treatment plant because it believes this to be the best option for the city. They report that a P3 costs less than other options, is less risky and is much more likely to be built on time and on budget. However, there are some who do not support the idea of a P3 approach because they feel it does not provide accountability to citizens, it will cost more than the traditional Design, Bid and Build (DBB) approach, privatization is risky, and Regina’s entire water system should be kept public. After hearing this description, respondents were asked to state which approach they personally support. Four in ten (40%) Regina residents say they support a P3 approach while three in ten (30%) support a traditional DBB approach. More than one quarter (27%) are unsure and another 3% are indifferent on the issue. A P3 approach is more strongly supported by males (46% vs. 35% among females) and support for this approach tends to rise with household income. Among those who plan to vote in the upcoming referendum (66% of respondents), 45% are in favour of a P3 approach while 37% prefer a DBB method. Nearly two in ten of those who plan to vote (18%) are unsure as to which approach they support. Research Details A total of 400 randomly selected SaskWatch Research™ panel members who live in Regina participated in the online research study from September 11th to 15th, 2013. Quotas were set by age, gender and region to match the general population of the city. As the research is conducted online, it is considered to be a non-probability proportion sample and therefore, margins of error are not applicable. About SaskWatch Research™ Insightrix started developing the SaskWatch Research™ online market research panel in October 2007, using high-quality techniques including telephone recruitment and referrals from existing panel members. Presently, there are over 14,000 active panel members representing all regions of the province, and distributions of the general population. The panel membership closely matches the 2011 Census based on age, gender, household composition, household income and education. For more information, please visit: http://saskwatch.ca. About Insightrix Founded in 2001, Insightrix Research Inc. is a full-service market research firm that helps clients develop, administer and manage data collection and information strategies. From its office in Saskatoon, Insightrix offers a comprehensive range of research services. For further information contact Lang McGilp, Senior Research Executive Insightrix Research Inc. Tel: 306.657.5640 Ext. 229 Cell: 306.290.9599 Fax: 306.384.5655 Email: lang.mcgilp@insightrix.com Web: www.insightrix.com...