How Black Friday & Cyber Monday Have Changed  In a recent article on Digiday.com entitled 5 Charts Showing Why Cyber Monday is Doomed the author, Shareen Pathak, looks at the changing trends both with the relatively new consumer holiday Cyber Monday and it’s distinction from Black Friday. For many shoppers, the online sales are a new edition of Black Friday. Black Friday has been around since the 50’s and the term was first coined in Philadelphia by the police. In the 50’s massive amounts of people would descend into town on the day after Thanksgiving. Stores would take advantage of this throng of people and would promote big sales specifically for this day. The phrase “Black Friday” represented the calendar day for the police who were stuck working a long and busy shift creating a dread for the date. Cyber Monday named after its close relative Black Friday is slowly fading according to Pathak. It was first created by the National Retail Federation back in 2005. The idea behind its creation was that it would mark the start of the holiday shopping season.   Want to read the full blog? Click Here   Interested in this topic? Check out others like it: The Man Behind the New Microsoft http://insightrixcommunities.com/man-behind-new-microsoft/ Shoppers Want More http://insightrixcommunities.com/shoppers-want-more/ Crying Over Spilled Coffee http://insightrixcommunities.com/crying-spilled-coffee/ Black Friday & Cyber Monday in Saskatchewan – 2017 https://insightrix.com/black-friday-cyber-monday-saskatchewan/ ...
 

In a recent article relating to Democratization of Information and Trust Levels, entitled 2016 Edelman Trust Barometer Finds Global Trust Inequality is Growing, Michael Bush shares with PR Newswire about this year’s findings of the annual Edelman Trust Barometer study. In this year’s 2016 report he shares how there has been a widening trust gap between the informed public and the mass population citing income inequality and divergent expectations as driving the gap. The report also shows changing levels of trust for CEO’s, employees, businesses, and governments. The article shows that trust levels are becoming more important to address than ever, as they affect sales, and as customers are looking for companies that are transparent and trustworthy. Want to read the full blog? Click Here </ br></ br> Interested in this topic? Check out others like it: Gaining Product Development Insights by Engaging with Adolescents http://insightrixcommunities.com/gaining-product-development-insights-engaging-adolescents/ Insight Communities and Modes of Thinking http://insightrixcommunities.com/insight-communities-mode-thinking/ How To Be Everywhere and Anywhere Your Customer Might Be http://insightrixcommunities.com/how-to-be-everywhere-and-anywhere-your-customer-might-be/ What Are Predictive Markets? https://insightrix.com/what-are-predictive-markets/...
 

Customer research is crucial In a recent article entitled, How to Prioritize Customer Research when Everything is a Priority, author Michael Margolis looks at the common challenges that he hears when meeting with startups. Each week he meets with startup CEO’s and the common question that he hears again and again is in regards to what role research should play? He states that the resounding question sounds like this: We have a small design team, and a long list of projects in different stages. On top of that, our bosses just asked us to work on personas, customer journeys, experience maps, i.e.,  [fill in the blank with other large research deliverables]. We want to incorporate more customer research, but we can’t do it all. What should we do? What should we test?  Margolis explains how testing ideas is important, but when you are dealing with a startup where time and resources are limited, the question comes down to prioritizing research, and then assess the potential impact of each effort and it’s urgency. He suggests a list of questions to ask before starting user research, to help identify key goals, important research questions and deadlines for each item...
 

User research is targeted research In a recent article entitled User Research at Instacart the author Dave Hora looks at the power of targeted research. For those who don’t know, Instacart is an Internet-based grocery delivery service that promises to deliver your groceries within an hour. They deliver from Costco, Whole Foods, Target and more. The company is valued at close to 2 billion dollars and in 2015 Forbes magazine named it The Most Promising Company in America. Hora was the Senior User Researcher at Instacart and in his article he examines how targeted research can benefit user experience and design. He states, “if you’re delivering software or services to people, targeted research will make your work better. You’ll make smarter decisions, less unnecessary failures, and form robust strategy earlier in the design process.” In his article he breaks down user research, and why it saves money, and how his company Instacart, conducts user research. Interested in the article?  Read more here: http://insightrixcommunities.com/user-research-instacart/   For more recent articles like this one, check out: Shoppers Want More: insightrixcommunities.com/shoppers-want-more/ When You Receive the Opposite of Customer Service: insightrixcommunities.com/when-you-receive-the-opposite-of-customer-service/ Recognition Technology – A Future In Market Research? https://insightrix.com/recognition-technology-market-research/...
 

Research shouldn't be a race If there is general agreement that obtaining customer input on your business is critical, why do so many companies have trouble with the execution of obtaining that research information? I was reminded of this after reading a recent article entitled, You only get one chance to talk to customers, right? The author, Matt Champagne does a tremendous job explaining the common errors that organizations commit when it comes to creating a survey. Like any company, customer feedback is crucial to creating new products, and improving existing products or services. The problem is that surveys are often seen as something that happens only once a year. By restricting customers to providing input only once a year, and with members of the organization often desperate to obtain feedback for their own department, may result in random questions being asked. Champagne states that this clearly violates the rule that states, a survey should focus on a single purpose and create questions around that single point. Organizations need to understand that by creating smaller, more frequent conversations with their customers they are more likely to get better, more consistent feedback. Click here to read full blog....
 

Microsurveys In a recent article by Tom Lancaster entitled Six Reasons Why Microsurveys Are a GRIT  2016 Trend to Watch, the CTO for InCrowd discusses how micro surveys have gone from being a talked about approach in research to being real and present today. Like most trends in technology, the emphasis seems to be on staying simple, short, and requiring less than a few moments of attention. Microsurveys seem to meet each of those criteria, and this perhaps may be the reason why they are taking over other survey methods such as behavioral models, biometrics, and wearables, according to Lancaster.  Having been involved in the market research industry for a long period of time, we have found that online panels meet the needs of busy panel members. With a panel we have found that sending short microsurveys out on a weekly basis to our panelists allows us to get the information needed by our clients, as well as better fit the time constraints of our panel members. That is why we believe wholeheartedly in what Lancaster has to say about micro surveys. Click here to read full blog....
 

Customer feedback is important How a company obtains feedback and suggestions on its products sounds like a simple problem. However, the amount of dissatisfaction with what appears to be simple, easy to fix problems, would appear to challenge that assumption. Last week I had the pleasure of going out for coffee and catching up with a friend I hadn’t seen in some time. We met at Tim Horton’s and caught up on the usual topics, family, hobbies, and work. My friend works for a large mining company in Northern Canada. He was asking me about work, and I mentioned to him about my researching and writing on market research online community software. Click here to read full blog.  ...
 

Insight communities and modes of thought In a recent article on Marketresearch.com’s blog Anne Beall examines the two different modes of thinking, one which is conscious and deliberate and the other more unconscious and automatic. These distinct types of thinking are not new, but in terms of market research insight, the treatment of the two as being separate is new and could be of incredible importance. Before we get into further details – let’s stop and understand the difference in the decision making process of a consumer, based on the two types of behavior: The two type of thinking modes are called systematic and heuristic. Click here to read full blog....
 

Do you plan to engage millennials to gather their opinions and product innovation? In a recent article by Fast Company entitled, These Millennials Have Become The Top Decision Makers At IBM, the author Cale Guthrie Weissman looks at how IBM has created a panel of millennial employees whom they can survey concerning key ideas and gather insights on how to stay relevant.  Why is this so revolutionary you might ask? Read more >>  ...
 

With the large amounts of data that market researchers deal with, finding ways to present data in a creative, interesting way can be a challenge. Here's a list of the six best ways to present your research data. #1: Interactive Dashboards Interactive dashboards let you communicate important information to your audience. A dashboard is a visual display of the most significant information from a project. The information appears on a single screen, offering a quick and simple way to monitor and evaluate a study’s progress. Dashboards are a highly effective way to present data to executives who don’t have a lot of time and need to be able to check data at any point in a project. #2. Infographics Infographics illustrate data and combine text, images, and design to tell the story of a study. They are becoming increasingly popular and since infographics present data in an engaging and easy-to-understand manner, they are frequently shared on social media, boosting the viral capabilities of your information. Infographics can drive increased traffic to your website and highlight key elements of your data. #3. Prezi Prezi is a new way to present information that engages audiences, visually demonstrates how ideas relate to one another, and allows collaboration in virtual space. Prezi is cloud-based, so you can present from your browser, desktop, or iPad and you will always have the most recent version available. Prezi offers visually engaging features such as zooming in and out of images and barrel rolls. Prezi is engaging and memorable, helping you make great presentations. #4. Videos/Vox Pops Videos let you put a face to the research, making study results more relatable and memorable. Vox pops are another effective way to bring research to life: vox pops (or streeters) are interviews with members of the public where people speak on camera and tell the viewer what they think and how they feel about a particular subject. Videos and vox pops can supplement both qualitative and quantitative research and is compelling way to involve the viewer in the research. #5. Motion Graphics Motion graphics are graphics that use video footage or animation technology to create the appearance of movement. They are often combined with audio and used in multimedia projects. Motion graphics are a captivating way to present your data and they help create a story for your data. The graphics help people understand concepts more clearly and make your project more appealing. #6. Web & Mobile Apps The increase in the number of smartphone users has led to the development of new ways of presenting data. In the increasingly fast-moving world, people need to be able to check reports and research data at any time, and apps are the perfect solution. Web apps let users check research data on their mobile devices, and the interactive nature of the apps lets the user control the research data they want to access and present. Apps are intuitive, easy to use, and an engaging way to view data and results. Related post: 4 Chart Tips to Turnaround Your Report Quickly ...