Digital marketing through social media is quickly changing the landscape of advertising in Saskatchewan. It is especially changing how marketers handle their overall marketing mix in influencing consumers to engage with their brand online. We marketers can no longer expect a marketing campaign to succeed without understanding our target audience, their demographics and their buyer journey. In order to figure out our audience segments, we have to cognize their motives - an apt way to do so is by employing basic market research behind your strategies. Insightrix Research is dedicated to equipping professionals with real insights from their customers in order to strengthen their brand.  To help with this, take a look at some insights from a recent study revealing how generations in Saskatchewan – from teens to seniors – use social media and what they expect from the brands they follow.     Nearly everyone in Saskatchewan is on Facebook In Saskatchewan, across all generations, Facebook dominates the media landscape by far, with 9 out of 10 using it daily ????????   But does that really come as a surprise to you? While it is probably safe to determine social media is here to stay, interestingly enough, nearly half of Saskatchewan residents (48%) believe they spend too much time on social media - yet more and more people are frequently accessing it!     Regardless, since 2015, social media has seen a slight lift (4%) in users across all platforms ????   Though Facebook dominates the social media landscape in our province, it is not a favourite among teens.  For example… Of the teens on social media, only 63% claim to use Facebook as often as other favourite social platforms, while 1 in 4 (73%) endorse Snapchat as their No. 1 platform, followed by YouTube (64%) and then Instagram (57%). Of gen-Xers (32 to 48) on social, 92% indicated that Facebook is their go-to platform, yet few gen-Xers (17%) admit they use Snapchat.   Interestingly enough, we also discovered that a number of gen-Xers (11%) claimed to have stopped using Snapchat in the past year.   What encourages Saskatchewan residents to use social media? Understanding a particular generation on social is a must for today’s businesses, as more and more corporations recognize the value of these digital tools. Because social media is no longer utilized for the sole purpose of marketing or making friends - it has evolved to help educate and actively encourage consumers to engage with businesses or brands online. So, by determining a generation’s motives for using social media, you can begin to assess what causes social media users to engage with your content. For example… While 80% of the SK population on social platforms claim to use these platforms to keep in touch with friends and family, it’s interesting to note that millennials (aged 18 to 25) flock to social media to find information (43%) regarding entertainment or events online. And… Gen-Xers (47%) use Facebook groups try to get rid of unwanted household items. Those baby boomers are somewhere in between, looking for a healthy mix of shared family photos (53%) or to get information on current events (50%). And matures 68+ (47%) are always on the lookout for those new recipes…   What do followers want from brands? We discovered that about one third (35%) of social media users in Saskatchewan follow particular businesses or brands ????????   And, while there are many reasons cited in the research as to why residents follow brands on social media, 1-in-5 millennials admit they follow a particular brand or business for the simple fact that they “like” it! Because we know almost 8-in-10 residents who follow brands do-so on Facebook, the real question is… what do consumers want from the businesses or brands they follow? The answer is in the discount!   Nearly 1-in-4 Saskatchewan residents claim discounts would likely get them to follow a business on social media ????‼   While 83% of millennials who follow brands on social media (aged 26 to 31) admit discounts encourage them to follow particular brands, only 42% of matures (68+) say it would likely make them hit the “like page” button. Interestingly enough, half of all residents who follow brands on social media (50%) flock to brand-specific channels for product/brand information and tips and advice.   The influencers in Saskatchewan consumer buyer decisions are…?     We discovered personal recommendations – including those within one’s social circles – play a major role in influencing buyer decisions of social media users in Saskatchewan. 78% of residents on social media claim recommendations from a friend, a family member or a known acquaintance have influence on their buying decisions ???? ????   Further, 1-in-3 social media users in Saskatchewan claim family and friend recommendations have a “high influence” on their purchasing decisions. Younger generations are twice as likely as older generations to be influenced by someone within their social circle during their buyer journey. It is also worth noting that 60% of millennials (aged 26 to 31) claim an online review or a recommendation from someone within their social media circle as influential, while only 38% of baby boomers use social media recommendations to influence purchasing decisions. All generations may be represented on social and some are probably following your brand, but your segments will have different expectations from you. As we have come to see it - teens in Saskatchewan use social for, well, social reasons; millennials use social to do their research and ask questions; Gen Xers use it to coordinate life events and make their day a little easier overall; baby boomers are observers and tend to use social as generalists and matures… matures love recipes. ✔ Want to know more about this Syndicated Report?   Click here!  ...

There is a new leading-edge tracking technology making big waves – recognition software. Global recognition (e.g., biometric recognition like infrared, odour, face recognition, fingerprint, retina, iris, palm print, voice, signature, DNA, etc.), and geolocation are emerging technologies used for examining people and their experiences - in an attempt to collect personalized information - while avoiding the disturbance of their privacy. In terms of the emerging technology itself, recognition tools are able to track your identity and keep note of things you regularly consume at a near-constant basis, and these tools have been revered as the next big market trend. The fact is, the demand is high for various industries in the race of the global recognition technology market. Government and utilities, military and homeland security, retail, banking, financial services, insurance, digital signage and web and mobile applications all have a stake in the future of recognition technology. They all want to know what you purchase, where you purchase and (the stiffest to measure) why you purchase? It is no surprise the market research industry are major contributors in the capacity to measure emotions and experiences, and with all the emerging recognition tools and technology, it begs the question - how will recognition technology effect the future industry of market research? Retail Juggernauts   Take retail into consideration. The wholesale industry is expected to experience significant growth in the use of recognition technology. Retail companies are interested in per market strategies in order to analyze customers based on target quotas, such as age, gender and other categorical attributes. Retail juggernauts are interested in campaigning to the consumers’ wants and needs, solely to hook you as a loyalist. For example, imagine waltzing into your favourite café and having your coffee already on its way to being made based on your ID via recognition technology. Imagine responding to the real-time notification to pay for your coffee. Sounds pretty forward thinking, right? Many retailers are already experimenting with recognition technology, such as with geolocation tools like iBeacons – a Bluetooth feature that can detect and record the location of smartphones. Like the purchase of a quick coffee, these beacons are often used to employ special offers to tempt consumers into purchase whether a consumer enters the store, or even when outside window shopping and passing by. Geolocation technology has a large market stronghold – with mobile media giants like Facebook, Yelp, and Foursquare all adopting this special technology. Industry analysts have been skeptical for years about consumers broadcasting their locations and were fairly uncertain if this technology could even be monetized. Despite this criticism, geolocation has since created a digital bridge between communication, the Internet and the target quota where on-the-go consumers will likely benefit for years to come. How does this effect the future of market research? With target quotas come innovative methodologies such as Sentiment Analysis. And with the adoption of recognition technology, associations and organizations, both public and private, can expand on anecdotal evidence such as the type of gender and age of recognition. Sentiment analysis can lead to major breakthroughs when analyzing a consumer’s wants when it comes to special retail features. It is commonly used in targeted advertising in order to understand the voice of the customer, and where the company can then analyze consumer interactions and decide if they are being done well. Of course, with the rise in technology growth, there is sure to be a rise in security concerns as these retail giants are rapidly adopting big brother-like technology (such as CCTV recordings), which are analyzed by facial recognition techniques and used for alarm systems, source-tagging and even aggressive advertisement.   Aggressively Advertise, Analyze, Reprise   Today, recognition technology is widely used as an effective advertising campaign tool. By measuring how an advertisement spot sells has been (for years) the No. 1 question on the minds of advertisers, brand developers and marketers alike. Understanding how to sell based on buyer emotions by way of advertisement can prove useful when attempting to quantify emotional expression regarding new products and services, and even promotional events such as media trailers and advertising campaigns. Ever see the film “Minority Report”? This science fiction, neo-noir, Spielberg/Cruise flick (set in the year 2054) features a futuristic city dogged with optical recognition systems (retinal scan), exploited by a militarized government emergency service and used to scan distinctive features in the iris. In “Minority Report”, this technology is further used in the place of security badges and identification, as well as for tailored billboards and ads. Wherever Captain Anderton (good ole, handsome Mr. Cruise) goes, he is tracked by cameras and biometric sensors and, as a result, is consistently bombarded with invasive, personalized ads. In 2002, it seemed out of this world to experience the thought of mind-reading advertisements. But, what was once considered futuristic technology is now on the brink of reality. Though retina recognition devices are still considered in beta, with the progress and high interest in facial recognition, it can’t be that far behind, can it? Do you ever feel like the world of Advertising doesn't speak to you?  Well, much like in the film “Minority Report”, a German beer making company, Astra , is looking to cash in recognition technology as a vehicle for targeted advertising. In 2015, Astra introduced a new beer advertising campaign focusing on a Bavarian brand geared toward women. By using a digital billboard, a built-in web camera and the latest in facial recognition technology, Astra was able to detect if a passerby was male or female, and based on the demographic the digital billboard, would either try and sell you a beer (female) or tell you to take a hike (male) – a bold move by a company that generally sells a product focused on men. The real kicker is the public billboard was able to tell if advertisement onlookers were not legal age, and advised the minors that walked by to just keep on moving. Innovative use of recognition technology or obtrusive product selling?   Sometimes this type of targeted advertisement can be used for social awareness campaigns, too. For example, to coincide with the 2014 International Women’s Day, a London, UK-based agency teamed up with Women’s Aid and Ocean Outdoor to create some noteworthy digital billboards that brought awareness to domestic violence. With the use of facial recognition, when an onlooker paid attention to the billboard of a battered woman, the billboard would remove the injuries. As more onlookers gazed directly, the cuts and bruises on the victim’s face would completely disappear - communicating that with each bystander we can make a difference in eliminating domestic abuse.     Make way for Biometric Recognition   The human face has approximately 43 facial muscles that can produce roughly 8,000 different combinations of smiles, smirks and upside down frowns. Expressions are not voluntary, nor are they dependent on social origin or ethnicity. That is the neat thing - facial expressions happen automatically, and at a flash speed (no more than 10 to 20 milliseconds). To be able to tap into a technology that can capitalize from recognizing standardized expressions will arguably change the way that advertisement designs are conceived and tested, making them more likely to succeed in the long run. Not only will advertisement benefit from biometric technology, but as the recognition tech industry rapidly evolves as a whole, high-tech enhancements will help lead us toward a future of adapting a level of behavioural recognition across all major industries — including market research. Behavioural research (or biometric recognition) often refers to an automatic recognition of individuals based on a particular feature from their physiological or behavioural characteristics. By using biometrics, a person can be identified based on who they are (e.g., face, finger scan, retinal scan, etc.) rather than what they are (card, token, number), or what they know (password, PIN). Traditionally, passwords and key cards have been used to restrict access to secure systems, but these methods can and have been breached before. The technology has become industrially unreliable and, therefore, biometric technology can make identity virtually impossible to steal, forget or forge - creating a lust for behavioural recognition technology among those organizations with the need for high-security clearance. How does this effect the future of market research? Emotional (and behavioural) recognition is a new frontier recognition technology. This method is accomplished by identifying patterns of certain behavioural triggers as they correlate to facial expressions – which are considered universal. By doing so, researchers are able to collect psychographic data at an unprecedented rate and at a much lower cost than what we’ve ever been able to do before. This is the opportunity marketers have been waiting for –  the capacity to acquire a much deeper understanding of their customers’ needs without the barrier of being obtrusive. Not only can the market research industry benefit from the use of biometric technology as research, MRX can also benefit from its use as a security measure to house its sensitive databases.   The Push to Quantify Emotions   With these emerging technologies come promise to clients that market researchers are now able to quantify emotions. Better tools for tracking emotions hold better promise for bringing awareness to how we feel through via outer feedback. This type of technology also promises to make it easier to understand websites, mobile applications, advertisements and a consumer’s emotional state or response to the product or service. For example, qualitative tools such as speech emotional analytics work to analyze vocally-transmitted emotions in real time. This kind of technology can decipher the speaker’s mood, an attitude toward the subject and emotional personalities (drivers for decision making) – an example of the innovative methods that market researchers can utilize in order to provide a deeper meaning when attempting to achieve emotional feedback. How does this effect the future of market research? Techniques like speech emotional analytics can be employed to sort voice messages according to the emotions portrayed by the caller in call centre applications. Among other things, a dialogue system may deploy knowledge on emotional user states to select a strategy in speaking with the potential respondent. This type of technology may even change the way we survey customers on their satisfaction levels - imagine being able to deploy a customer satisfaction survey with the use of emotional analytics. Interested in how Insightrix uses recognition technology? Visit: https://insightrix.com/case-study-neuroscientific-market-research/...

In a recent Insightrix article on neuroscience, we discussed the trend of neuromarketing, or as preferred for our purposes, using neuroscience tools and methodologies in the field of market research. Aside from leaving many wracked with existential dread, the article on neuroscience raises a few questions about how the processes described in the post actually work and how they are useful in the field of market research. If you haven’t yet, you may want to give it a read, as it will fill in any blanks from this post and tell you why this is relevant to market research. As Insightrix is all about providing answers, we decided to write another blog article to talk about it and provide some clarity regarding the ways neuroscience is used in market research. In the last post, we mention EEG, eye tracking and facial coding, so we’ll go from there. EEG (Electroencephalogram)  EEG (electroencephalogram) can be a powerful addition to the toolkit of market researchers. In the field of market research, EEG biosensors are used to measure changes in participants’ brain activity to try to track changes in participants’ levels of attention to what they are seeing and/or hearing. With interpretation, this can be a useful tool for researchers wishing to know what parts of their content (video/commercial/film/etc.) held an audience’s attention best, and where that audience’s attention strayed from their message. EEGs monitor changes in the electrical activity in the brain and allow researchers to measure changes in the levels of attention participants  experience when viewing and/or listening to content (video/advertisement/movie clip/etc.), or when trying a new product. Theoretically, when attention is high, electrical activity in the brain increases, and when attention is low, electrical activity falls. With data derived from this process, market researchers can discover what points of the experience were most interesting (held participants’ attention), and what parts caused attention to drift. EEG biosensors are relatively small and, as a result, they are portable. This means marketers can use them almost anywhere (stores, theatres, wherever) to get responses and data in natural settings.   Eye Tracking    Now that you are armed with the understanding of what your participants’ attention levels are doing, you’ll need to have some kind of way to find out where that attention is being directed. That’s where eye tracking comes in. Eye trackers are usually portable, multi-camera apparatuses that track participants’ eye-movements (of course), how long something is looked at and (in some models) even track the number of times a participant blinks. The data generated from this lets market researchers know just where participants are looking, and for how long they looked at it. Many eye trackers are extra useful, in that they come with software that allows researchers to designate specific elements in the test material to see how many times a specific field was looked at, and how long and how many people looked at it. This can be very useful if you want to know how noticeable a brand logo or your visual messaging is. Data from eye trackers is represented with the help of some handy and sophisticated software in graphic visualizations. Generally, these visualizations can be in the form of Heat Mapping, Bee Swarms (no, not real bees) and/or Gaze Plotting. If you want to see what this looks like, check out the video attached to this post.  Like EEG biosensors, eye trackers are relatively inexpensive and can be set up almost anywhere – some can even be attached to laptops or phones.When used in conjunction with other neuro tools and tried-and-true techniques like in-depth interviews and focus groups, eye trackers can provide very powerful data.  Facial Coding Now that you think you understand at what points your participant is interested and attentive, and to where and at what your participant is looking, it would be nice to have some idea about what your participant might be feeling in regards to what she is looking at. This is where facial coding can be useful. Facial coding uses existing facial recognition technology (like the kind they use to track down criminals or create matches on dating sites) to try to learn about participants’ emotional state in relation to test materials. With cameras and some really complicated software, researchers try to detect seven basic, universal emotions in participants. These emotions have been proven through a great deal of testing and re-testing (of the scientific kind) to be associated to seven basic facial expressions (disgust, delight, sadness, skeptical, surprised, fear and negative emotions like anger). These facial expressions are universal and are the same in everybody, regardless of age, culture or ethnic background. It is hoped that using facial coding technology as a tool in market research can allow researchers to read their participants’ emotional responses before they are able to rationalize them into thought and words. The goal is to give an impression of the knee-jerk responses your test materials engender in observers – data that is useful if you want to know if your product is being well received or not. And there it is… There you have it – some of the most common tools used in the field of neuroscience, and particularly, in neuroscience as it employed in the field of market research. It doesn’t take a degree in neuropsychology or neurobiology, or even one in marketing, to understand how, when put together with the other tools described in this article and adept interpretation, combined with tried-and-true market research methodologies like in-depth interviews and focus groups, can come together to make a powerful toolkit for market researchers. With that said, these techniques require a caveat when used in market research in that they are useful and appropriate only in specific settings. The human mind is ridiculously complex, and attempting to understand its processes through machines can produce less trustworthy data if well-defined and rigorous research design is not put in place. Most market researchers who employ neuroscience methodologies advocate their use in conjunction with tried-and-true market research methodologies like focus groups and/or in-depth interviews. If you’d like to understand more about why neuroscience in market research is used in the first place, check out this article about just that. Keep checking back to the Insightrix blog regularly for updates on how Insightrix uses neuroscience and other cutting-edge techniques and methodologies in its own client projects.     Sources: neursky.com/neuromarketing-and-eeg-measuring-engagement-in-advertising scholar.google.ca/ijps/article lcbr-online.com/index_files/proceedingsemc12 greenbookblog.org/neuromarketing-identifying-the-fact-from-the-fiction/...

 A person is able to articulate their wants and desires through conscious, reflective deliberation, through weighing facts and arguments and through making rational decisions, right?   Right? Actually - probably not. While most of us think we are consciously creating all of our thoughts and decisions through rational processes, research in the field of neuroscience has actually told us something else might be going on. Making decisions or forming opinions like this may not actually be the reality when it comes to our reactions to new situations, ideas or even products – really, in any situation in which you react emotionally. According to neuroscience, that’s because most emotional decisions of this kind are made unconsciously. Think about it. When you see something new, and you feel a certain way about it, do you think about why you should feel the way you do first - or do you just feel a certain way about that thing or situation and then try to find reasons for the reaction you are having? Most likely, you thought about your feelings a bit, and decided why you felt the way you did. If that is the case, you are normal – or as normal as the rest of us, anyway. According to neuroscience research, qualitative decisions of an emotional nature are often made on the unconscious level – meaning these decisions are made with little or no authorship of the observer. Aside from the existential angst this may provoke (remember to breathe), this has more than a few implications when it comes to market research.   Neuroscience in market research People’s knowledge and understanding of their own wants and desires is usually dependent on their own power to describe and articulate those wants and desires to themselves. This self-articulation allows them to form opinions about those desires. This state of affairs might create all kinds of issues in the field of market research, as so much of what market researchers do depends on asking people what they think and feel about a certain thing, situation or idea. What happens when the participants in market research might not actually know why they feel the way they do – that they just feel a certain way about a thing or situation and think up reasons for their feelings after feeling them? You can imagine that in situations like this, the data gathered might be problematic at best. Many traditional, qualitative market research methods (focus groups, surveys, etc.) rely on participants’ conscious thoughts and their conscious creation of ideas and words to express those thoughts to the researcher. To try to get around this challenge, many market research firms have adopted neuroscientific techniques and methodologies, adapting them to fit the demands specific to market research. Used in the field of market research, the use of neuroscience techniques is referred to as Neuromarketing. This term, though, gives many in the field of market research serious pause, as the practice in question has little to do with marketing itself and more to do with the market research process – it has more to do with discovery than selling. For our intents and purposes, then, for this article the practice will be referred to as the use of neuroscience in market research.       So what’s it all about? Neuroscience is not about reading people’s minds or predicting consumer behaviour. As far as we know, nothing can do that. Rather, using neuroscience in market research is about attempting to use technology to get around the need for participants to describe their feelings, bypass participants’ conscious reactions and their conscious creation of thoughts and words and try to uncover participants’ unfiltered reactions about a product, idea or situation. The means by which researchers try to read participants’ emotional reactions are through an array of techniques and gadgets that monitor changes in participants’ physical states, allowing researchers to interpret these changes. It is these interpretations that result in data. Some common techniques and tools to attempt this are EEG monitoring (to try to track participants’ levels of attention to what they see and/or hear), eye tracking (to track where participants are looking) and facial coding (to attempt to track how participants feel about what they experience). All of these tools and techniques may give market researchers a look into participants’ unrationalized feelings and reactions, without having to get participants to describe how they feel. These feelings that we are told have been provided by participants without their filtering or rationalization could, ostensibly, provide much more reliable qualitative data.   For a case study describing neuroscience tools we use for market research, click here. This is probably why the neuroscience market is expected to grow at a compound annual growth rate of 2.9%, reaching a market value of over $30.8 billion by 2020. That’s not to say tried-and-true qualitative market research techniques like focus groups and in-depth interviewing are doomed to obscurity. Far from it. There is no one market research tool or technique that will give you all the answers – including neuroscience. In fact, most market researchers who employ neuroscience techniques and tools in market research rely on the established and dependable methods we’ve all come to count on in conjunction with neuroscience. Most market researchers believe there is a great amount of value in participants’ own descriptions of their feelings and their involvement in the research process, itself. A Proven Method? Who’s to say what the filtering and rationalization we all use to describe our emotions actually plays in decision-making and the formation of emotional reactions? There is still much that is unknown about this process. For this reason and others, forthright market researchers who employ neuroscience techniques and tools usually adhere to proven methods like focus groups and in-depth interviews to back up and gain insight from the data acquired through this form of research.  The field of neuroscience and its tools can provide a lot of data when it comes to understanding the reactions of market research participants. Through a mix of the use of neuroscience technology and methodology in addition to proven market research techniques, market researchers can better access the feelings and attitudes of their participants. For more information on neuroscience techniques and tools used in the field of market research, check out the Insightrix Blog. Also, have a look at a case study describing one of the Insightrix research projects in which these techniques were used.   Sources: http://www.marketingprofs.com/opinions/2016/29822/what-neuroscience-can-teach-us-about-marketing http://www.grandviewresearch.com/industry-analysis/neuroscience-market https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/278922 http://www.greenbookblog.org/2017/01/19/neuromarketing-identifying-the-fact-from-the-fiction/ http://essay.utwente.nl/65342/1/Roth_BA_MB.pdf...

Recently, Insightrix Research® conducted a quantitative study with Saskatchewan residents about their habits on social media usage. Measuring social media usage was the main topic of the research, including determining the ways people in Saskatchewan connect and their preference of social media platforms like Facebook, Snapchat, Twitter or Instagram. This study is the latest installment in our continuing Social Media Habits Syndicated Report series, a series reporting on Saskatchewan social media usage and habits exclusively. We employed the Insightrix SaskWatch Research®  to survey a representative sample of more than 800 Saskatchewan residents to see how they navigate their social media landscape.   The report answers questions like:   What social media platform is most popular among specific demographics? How many Saskatchewan residents are engaging with more than one platform, and if so, which platforms?   As in the 2015 installment of the series, we are delivering to you (for free!) highlights from the Syndicated Report.  More than that, we have gathered together a list of 7 compelling statistics for marketers with an eye on Saskatchewan. Whether you are a marketer, or if you occupy an integrated role that requires you to think like a marketer, these social media usage statistics confirm the importance of developing a targeted social media strategy for business.   #1. More residents were using social media in 2016 than in 2015 In our latest study, we discovered nine out of ten residents (87%) use social networking sites like Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. This represents an increase of 4% in the last year. 4: Do you use social networking sites such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest or LinkedIn etc.? Base, 2016, All respondents, n = 1,500. With more people logging on to social media since last year, this statistic proves the need for businesses to direct at least some portion of their marketing energy to social media efforts, or risk missing out on a trend that seems to be here to stay.   #2. Most Saskatchewan millennials are using social media of some kind In our study, we found that 99% of pioneer youth between the ages of 18-25 use social media sites like Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn or Instagram. Compare this to the fact that only 67% of Saskatchewan residents over the age of 68 use social media. 4: Do you use social networking sites such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest or LinkedIn etc.? Base, 2016, All respondents, n = 1,500. #3. Facebook remains the top social networking platform for Saskatchewan residents Once again, Facebook has come out on top with Saskatchewan social network users. Over the year, Facebook’s popularity has held steady with 90% of those surveyed reporting they use the platform. YouTube’s popularity has gone up significantly, from 38% to 51% of those surveyed stating they use the networking site. Twitter, on the other hand, continues to get little love from Saskatchewan residents, with usership at 19% of those surveyed.   6a. Which of these social networking sites...

We recently used our online community software to complete a small-scale, three-day Bulletin Board online discussion with 20 participants we recruited from our 15,000-member online panel, SaskWatch®. The purpose of the online discussion board was to look at how effective a three-day online research project could be. In the first two days, we asked participants about their favourite sports teams and their preferred way of watching television and movies while on the third day, we probed for feedback on the actual bulletin board, itself. This online format proved to be an excellent way to gather input from participants, as well as create an engaging experience that will keep members participating in further research projects. This ongoing participation is different from traditional focus group participation. Focus groups are great when in-person product interaction is needed. An example of in-person interaction would be a company producing a product on which they want feedback, in regards to shape, design, texture, weight, etc. Another example would be if a company or restaurant wanted to do taste tests. In instances such as these, the focus group is imperative. However, in other instances where in-person feedback is not necessary, focus groups prove to have their limitations. They are very time-intensive, and often involve travelling to various locations to gather feedback. These time and travel costs can grow exponentially, and the amount of input and time participants can commit are limited. This is where online communities prove to be invaluable. Online communities allow participants the opportunity to join in and participate, regardless of location or time of day. The findings from this project showed the online bulletin boards are flexible, and help steer research based on objectives while allowing the ability to probe for deeper insights as the research progresses. Convenience was another key finding. Participants were able to log into the bulletin board at a time that was convenient for them, allowing time for reflection that ultimately produced better quality research.     Unlike focus groups, the bulletin board research project proved to be very cost-effective with a fast turnaround. Partha Roy is a senior research executive at Insightrix Research® and he was the lead researcher in charge of this bulletin board project. Partha began working for Insightrix Research last year and, prior to that, he worked for Millward Brown as an associate account director, both in Singapore and South Korea.   Want to read the case study? Interested in this topic? Check out others like it: The Science of Stupid http://insightrixcommunities.com/the-science-of-stupid/  Anti-bullying - Using an Online Community for Public Consultation  http://insightrixcommunities.com/anti-bullying-using-online-community-public-consultation/ The Rise of Marketing Technology http://insightrixcommunities.com/the-rise-of-marketing-technology/...

When it comes to knowing her clients, Sally gets it. Sally understands that in today’s business world, you have to know who your clients are if you want to be successful. Sally knows no matter the quality or appeal of your product or service (even if it is the highest quality accordion wax!) a thorough knowledge of your client base, their habits and their needs is crucial. That’s where SaskWatch Research® comes in. SaskWatch is a Saskatchewan-based online research panel made up of more than 15,000 people who call Saskatchewan home. For nearly 10 years,  some of our country’s most dominant brands and influential organizations (like SaskTel, SaskPower, SGI, Affinity Credit Union, many of Saskatchewan’s government ministries and many, many others) have employed SaskWatch for their research needs. SaskWatch is more than just a space for businesses or service providers to learn about their client bases – it is about the people who provide the service. SaskWatch is not just the research community powered by Insightrix – it is an online community that genuinely makes a difference in Saskatchewan. It is a chance for the opinions, ideas, thoughts and behaviours of people like you help better inform business decisions. Since 2008, research Saskwatch has facilitated through Insightrix has made a real difference – and that is thanks to its members. Recently, SaskWatch members have used their online power to influence political, social and consumer decision makers through making their own thoughts and opinions heard. They have influenced city life in Saskatoon, resulting in a decrease in the cost of civic leisure passes. SaskWatch members have even had a hand in helping the Saskatchewan Roughriders get an understanding of how the people of Saskatchewan view them, who their die-hard fans are and even got to have a say in the construction of Mosaic Stadium in Regina! So, get online and start a survey today and have a chance to have your say about what matters to you....

Research can be conducted for a number of reasons, one of which is to shape policy. Advocacy research’s main purpose is to influence formal and informal policies created by policymakers. Therefore, it is important to gather solid data so that your research clearly shows the needs or problems you want addressed. In February 2013 the federal government of Saskatchewan hired Insightrix Research to investigate the need for a provincial anti-bullying strategy, the Saskatchewan Government challenged Insightrix to develop and deliver the most effective public consultation process using both in-person interview sessions as well as using Insightrix Communities software for online engagement. The needs for researching bullying and coming up with a solid anti-bullying strategy within the province is great. Bullying is a serious issue in schools, work, and the community. The effects of bullying can pose long-term issues and complications. For the study Insightrix conducted in-person interviews coupled concurrently with Insightrix Community software. 16 in-person consultations were run throughout the province, which drew a total of 400 participants to these consultations. At the same time that these in-person consultations were running, Insightrix created an online community which both the government and Insightrix promoted. This online community led to 600 Saskatchewan residents joining the online community. Both the in-person sessions and the online community had moderator presenting questions which allowed the government and Insightrix to listen to residents and gather new insights regarding the topic. Based on the discussions both in-person and online Insightrix was able to compile a report detailing people’s thoughts and experiences regarding anti-bullying initiatives and strategies. The report showed that the online consultation was well-received by residents, and the dialogues conducted within the community were deep, and thoughtful providing insights that were unable to be gathered during the in-person sessions. The online community also allowed members from all over the province to participate creating a broader audience. The online community software allowed access to every single comment made, and allowed the government access to read, and monitor comments at any time. The online community stayed open two weeks past the in-person consultations allowing the findings of the in-person sessions to be tested with the online community.  By using geo-IP data the Insightrix Communities platform was able to show participation and input from all across the province. From the in-person sessions as well as the online community discussions Insightrix was able to come up with key findings about the type of bullying that goes on within Saskatchewan and help the government create policies to reduce bullying in schools, and the community and provide the support and education needed to combat it. By conducting the research online, as well as in-person the government was able to ensure inclusion for all geographic regions in the province. This was a great example of using research to guide policy making so that each community member could feel fairly represented. If you would like to find out more about how our online community software can be used to help you create policy please feel free to contact us. Want to read the full blog? Click Here Interested in more case studies? Check out others like it: CASE STUDY – Online Voting with 26,000+ Members https://insightrix.com/saskcanola-online-voting-case-study/ CASE STUDY – The Real Estate Institute of Western Australia Advertising Concept Testing https://insightrix.com/reiwa-advertising-testing-using-facial-expression-analysis/ CASE STUDY – City of Saskatoon Youth Engagement Strategy  https://insightrix.com/city-of-saskatoon-youth-engagement-strategy/...

How Black Friday & Cyber Monday Have Changed  In a recent article on Digiday.com entitled 5 Charts Showing Why Cyber Monday is Doomed the author, Shareen Pathak, looks at the changing trends both with the relatively new consumer holiday Cyber Monday and it’s distinction from Black Friday. For many shoppers, the online sales are a new edition of Black Friday. Black Friday has been around since the 50’s and the term was first coined in Philadelphia by the police. In the 50’s massive amounts of people would descend into town on the day after Thanksgiving. Stores would take advantage of this throng of people and would promote big sales specifically for this day. The phrase “Black Friday” represented the calendar day for the police who were stuck working a long and busy shift creating a dread for the date. Cyber Monday named after its close relative Black Friday is slowly fading according to Pathak. It was first created by the National Retail Federation back in 2005. The idea behind its creation was that it would mark the start of the holiday shopping season.   Want to read the full blog? Click Here   Interested in this topic? Check out others like it: The Man Behind the New Microsoft http://insightrixcommunities.com/man-behind-new-microsoft/ Shoppers Want More http://insightrixcommunities.com/shoppers-want-more/ Crying Over Spilled Coffee http://insightrixcommunities.com/crying-spilled-coffee/ Black Friday & Cyber Monday in Saskatchewan – 2017 https://insightrix.com/black-friday-cyber-monday-saskatchewan/ ...

In a recent article relating to Democratization of Information and Trust Levels, entitled 2016 Edelman Trust Barometer Finds Global Trust Inequality is Growing, Michael Bush shares with PR Newswire about this year’s findings of the annual Edelman Trust Barometer study. In this year’s 2016 report he shares how there has been a widening trust gap between the informed public and the mass population citing income inequality and divergent expectations as driving the gap. The report also shows changing levels of trust for CEO’s, employees, businesses, and governments. The article shows that trust levels are becoming more important to address than ever, as they affect sales, and as customers are looking for companies that are transparent and trustworthy. Want to read the full blog? Click Here </ br></ br> Interested in this topic? Check out others like it: Gaining Product Development Insights by Engaging with Adolescents http://insightrixcommunities.com/gaining-product-development-insights-engaging-adolescents/ Insight Communities and Modes of Thinking http://insightrixcommunities.com/insight-communities-mode-thinking/ How To Be Everywhere and Anywhere Your Customer Might Be http://insightrixcommunities.com/how-to-be-everywhere-and-anywhere-your-customer-might-be/ What Are Predictive Markets? https://insightrix.com/what-are-predictive-markets/...