Multi-channel ad campaigns have their own challenges It doesn’t take a genius to know today’s customer is always connected and that audiences consistently have their finger on the social pulse through social media and the internet. And, let’s face it, getting honest feedback about your company, your product or your advertising can be especially difficult. This is the reality most advertisers are working in today, especially those working in multi-channel campaigns. With the desire to get messages out to as wide an audience as possible, many creative professionals can be quick to launch a multi-channel advertising campaign without putting effort into understanding how the overall message of the campaign is about to be received.  When advertisers (or marketers for that matter) are executing their digital campaigns this way, without employing ad testing methodologies and being unaware of how their messages are going to be received by their audiences, it is usually to be quicker than the other guy, or to avoid the dreaded, “Why did you spend money on that?” These micro-marketing moments can have a major impact on your brand, and if your audience does not respond well to your campaign, the backlash can happen as quickly as a comment on social media can be posted. Not employing creative testing can come at the cost of your brand’s reputation   While marketers and advertisers want to be quick and efficient, what they need is to be credible and relevant. This is even more relevant in multi-channel campaigns, in which messaging can change depending on in what location and on what medium it is being seen, and who the intended audience will be.  There are simple tools that can help deliver customer feedback on your advertising at the same pace your target audience is connecting with you. Feedback tools like advertising testing offer real value when it comes to seeing how your creative will be received, and are a great alternative to the more traditional (*ahem* not-as-quick) forms of evaluation.   What follows are 5 benefits of advertising testing in multi-channel campaigns   1. Find out what will work next time, and the time after, and the time after that… When you put an ad testing methodology to work on your creative, you are benchmarking – gathering data on what works best and what was less successful, what audiences engaged with most, how different channels engage with your advertisement, etc. By testing and adding to benchmarks and established norms about your creative, you will accumulate data on how to create great ads again and again based on what worked best before. 2. Your creative is good – It could be better… Want to turn out creative that will succeed in the audience you intend it to speak to? By testing your ad, you can make sure not only that your messaging is exactly how you intend it, but also that the message speaks exactly to whom you intend it to reach. New developments in methodologies have even made it possible to measure the virality of an ad before it is launched. Sure, the original messaging in the ad may have fallen short at first – but through ad testing, you can be sure to change it up before that creative ever hits the streets. 3. Money! Of course! A terrible ad costs the same to produce as a great one. At least, it can unless ad testing is put in place to catch that bad ad before it sees any large investment. Most of the spend on creatives will happen during the final phase of their production. Ad testing is usually done in the very beginning phases of the creative, using storyboards, animatics and other pre-production materials. Testing at this phase allows for your audience to get an idea of where a creative is going before it gets there, but saving the investment it would take to get that creative all the way finished and presented to them – a potentially sizeable savings.  4. We could all be a little more customer-centric… Providing what your customers want out of your organization is key in today’s marketplace. By employing ad testing with your customer base, you are listening to your customers and possibly co-creating with them. With data about your ads coming directly from your customer base, you can develop creative that speaks directly to them. 5. Protect your company’s reputation! Not employing creative testing can come at the cost of your brand’s reputation. While marketers and advertisers want to be quick and efficient, what they need is to be credible and relevant. Communicating with any audience involves some level of risk. Testing advertisements and their messages can help brands remove some of the risk by showing how messages will be received before they are visible to everyone, allowing for the gauging of opinion or reaction to your creative – potentially saving a brand from harm or embarrassment....

Market research is a powerful tool for advocacy In an internet age, not-for-profit organizations should understand how important it is to adopt market research as advocacy to help inform their public interest initiatives. Because not-for-profits are vital to the local communities they serve, it is their shared responsibility to encourage policy and law makers to do what is right for the public. By using advocacy market research, not-for-profits can adopt a robust tool to put their cases forward and reach change agents in all levels of government.   This is research for advocacy in a nutshell. In most funding circles, advocacy is often considered an “art of persuasion”; it can be loosely defined as “converting the impossible into the inevitable”. Ask any campaign manager and they will tell you the same. The question is: How do campaign managers convert the impossible and reach the public to create more awareness and become relevant to policymakers?   Research for advocacy When we think of research for advocacy, some may think of decades of long, drawn-out research studies that show obscure connections between lifestyle and behaviour factors. And while some industry research can take many years to yield actionable results, research for advocacy can often be done MORE QUICKLY and can deliver information that is sometimes more relevant to policymakers. One way to get an advocacy message in front of the public is by undertaking and publicizing research that demonstrates the need for such laws or policies, the public support behind them and the likely results if the change were implemented. For example, as part of Tourism Saskatoon’s strategic plan, they identified the need to expand hosting capacity and to remain competitive for business and sporting events. For the past several years, the city of Saskatoon has seen on and off support for a new downtown arena and convention centre. Because Tourism Saskatoon ran a public opinion poll conducted by Insightrix to promote their advocacy message, they received media coverage to help grow support and validate their city planning initiatives. Insightrix worked with the Tourism Saskatoon on the question wording to ensure that the answers represented the views of the community, and were not leading, thereby ensuring credibility. This is an example of publicizing research that demonstrates the direct interest of the community. https://globalnews.ca/news/4101828/downtown-arena-tourism-saskatoon/ (media coverage) http://www.tourismsaskatoon.com/about/about-strategic-plan/ (strategic plan) What distinguishes research for advocacy from other types of evidence-based research is that it is focused on specific answers in mind, and that it is a part of an overarching strategy to influence potential policy development and policy change. While other research can contribute to the overall understanding of an issue, market research for advocacy has a narrow and specific aim, and it does not have to take a lot of time or money to be effective for advocacy campaigns.    Think like an NGO and run an Omnibus Poll Most NGOs conduct research in-house, but can use market research firms to help with validating or creating evidence for the larger research projects undertaken by these organizations. NGOs often use market research to “top up” their existing research by employing omnibus surveys and using locally-conducted research. Omnibus surveys often make good news, particularly if your research is interesting and shows potential for strong public support for the initiative at hand. Not-for-profits should monitor how NGOs conduct omnibus polling – as these kinds of research methodologies can be done easily and are inexpensive to conduct. At Insightrix, we run a monthly omnibus poll. Omnibus surveys are a quick and cost-effective, potent research tool that doesn’t break the bank. Our monthly omnibus sample is random and representative: we set quotas by region, age and gender to ensure the sample matches the distribution of the populations. When thinking about conducting an omnibus survey – keep two things in mind: your story should be newsworthy and contain something interesting that will catch people’s attention (or the attention of journalists), and it should also incorporate the advocacy message. Many NGOs have created media partnerships that have proven to be fruitful. With the internet becoming an important tool to promote timely research, low-cost media advocacy is an inexpensive way to increase your initiative’s chances for success, especially when it becomes news.   Getting an “in” with the media Using the media to get your advocacy research in front of the public is an effective way to secure better policies on a range of issues.  Cultivating relationships with journalists and local media can be difficult – that is, until you get your in with them. Media professionals are often on the look out for good ideas to write about for an article or to produce a segment for broadcast, and they pay close attention to press releases they receive. However, your press or media release itself is not the objective of advocacy; it is the effect of the news coverage that is important, and that may not always be easy to measure. One of the best ways to get your in with the media is to be analytical in your own observations of the media and their interactions with those you’re trying to reach. Attempt to understand what type of news is considered newsworthy - What appeals to readers? What issues gain little attention and which gain a lot? Are there local journalists who are more interested in social issues than others? Through your own research, you can see what gets covered in the media and how that information is presented. Doing this will create advocacy research that is desirable to media, that will be easier to digest and that will more than likely land you publicity for your initiative.   Use omnibus research to spur your advocacy efforts Media and research are two extremely valuable tools that can increase the awareness of your advocacy research and often require few resources other than the time and people to see them through. By using more advocacy to validate long-term research, by strengthening your relationship with the media (thereby building the understanding of the population), it will be much easier to influence the policies that matter to them most over time.  ...

Gauge citizen engagement - check in with the people who matter most Imagine you are a manager within a municipal department and/or provincial ministry. Now, imagine you are asked if citizens are aware of and satisfied with your department’s services, or perhaps if they have seen and can recall your department’s ad campaign.   Yikes!  How are you going to do this? How can you measure your success and get data to help in planning your next steps? OK – take a minute to breathe. It’s not really happening! This situation is fictional, of course. After all, this isn’t 1988. Today, you can easily get this data! However, budgets are tight and you need research that is not only timely, but that is affordable as well. Policy planning cannot be built on intuition. To do any good planning upfront or to validate those plans later, you need a pulse check to ensure initiatives or plans are on the right track - and any good plan has proper research behind it. How does omnibus research work? Government employees who employ omnibus research work together with research professionals to develop expertly crafted research questions to obtain the information they need. These research questions can be asked in one or two ways, either as closed or open-ended questions, depending on the kind of intelligence desired. Examples of closed questions Closed questions are designed to get a specific response from the population – either a yes or no answer, or perhaps a response to a multiple response question (one that asks for responses that involve picking one or more responses from a pre-determined list of possible responses). Example of an open-ended question Open-ended questions ask the population for a verbatim response, allowing for you to obtain citizen engagement in their own words. With the choice of either open-ended or closed questions, you have the choice of asking either qualitative or quantitative research questions – meaning there is virtually no end to the types of issues you can examine.   What kinds of market research are available to government managers? With omnibus research, you can obtain intelligence of almost any kind, and benefit from consultation with experienced researchers to ensure the survey is accurate and regionally representative. Measure citizen engagement and citizen participation in new or existing initiatives. Understand how initiatives have performed with the people who matter most – residents in your province or city itself. Provide needed information to inform stakeholders of the importance of a cause or issue. Answer objections that may be raised about a proposed policy change before rolling it out. Demonstrate popular support for a specific policy or program.   There are very few research topics market research cannot answer for governments. In the past, Insightrix has provided research insight on many policy and planning decisions. Awareness and usage of government services Recall rates of government advertising campaigns Satisfaction with specific government services Citizen opinion research relating to hot-button issues like the legalization of cannabis, anti-bullying policies, etc.   Government can do fast, lean research In times of shrinking budgets, the research budget is often one of those hardest hit. Maximize research budgets by employing omnibus research. Omnibus research allows you to do fast, lean, regionally representative research at a fraction of the cost of custom studies. How fast? Omnibus research allows for you to submit research questions and receive actionable data and insight back in just a few days. With the Insightrix omnibus service, you can begin a research project, put it into field and receive valuable insights back in only 7 days from beginning to end. How affordable? Omnibus research projects field multiple research projects together, all at once, at the same time every month. Combining questions from multiple research projects in a single survey increases government purchasing power by spreading costs across a larger sample. Choose the sample The Insightrix omnibus service, OnTopic™, allows you to choose the geographic location of interest. If you’d like to know about what people in Regina or Saskatoon feel about a specific topic to validate initiatives against the opinions and beliefs of those regions or against those of rural or northern demographics, OnTopic can accommodate. OnTopic allows for sample to be taken from either Saskatoon, Regina, southern Saskatchewan, northern Saskatchewan, or just one of these places - or all at once for the whole province. We set age, gender and region quotas to ensure the sample is representative of the area of interest. If you are a government decision maker in Manitoba, we’ve got you covered too. Insightrix OnTopic gets you regionally representative sample that is either specific to Winnipeg or province wide. How you use omnibus research is up to you. Are you interested in using omnibus research? The Insightrix omnibus service, OnTopic, is just an email or phone call away. Our experienced researchers and analysts are here to consult with you on the formulation of research questions, to put them into field and to assist in making the most out of the results. We run OnTopic once every month in Saskatchewan on the first Friday of every month, and we provide detailed tables that contain useful, actionable insights only a week later on the following Friday. We also do follow the same process in Manitoba, on the following week. Get the intelligence you need for a fraction of the cost of custom research projects.   ...

You could be doing research for your small business Getting the chance to ask research questions for your business is often thought to be beyond the ability of most small and medium-sized businesses (SMB). Market research, while desperately needed for SMB, can be considered a lower priority when determining what an SMB should or should not spend money. With the constant need to probe, learn and collect intelligence for businesses – in an economy where everyone is trying to market their product effectively – research should not be the first budget item on the chopping block. Especially when market research companies offer cost-saving alternatives to custom research projects like omnibus research. Not only is market research a necessity for all levels and types of business – it could also save further investment down the road and have a major impact on the brand. Getting actionable insights from asking the right research questions can be both affordable and accessible to all businesses who need a pulse check.  The question is, what are some best practices to employ to create good research questions that yield actionable results? Actionable market research needs to start out right It isn’t always easy to find the right place to start a market research project. It may be there are many ideas for research that come to mind. But a good place to get rolling is to decide the exact research questions you would like to have answers for. Market research isn’t always about uncovering the hidden insights that you never knew before you started – it is also to help clarify or validate what you already knew.     Think about it this way… As an SMB, start by asking, “What kind of market intelligence is it that I want or need for my business?” or “What evidence am I after to clarify my business or marketing strategy?” Let’s say you are a business developer or a marketing specialist for a tech company. You are ready to start concept testing on a new feature of the product but do not know if your customers are interested or ready in such a feature. You may rely on your general understanding of how the product works to prepare the lot of questions in ways that make sense to you - but will that yield actionable results? You may come up with questions like… -or- But take a minute. Are these questions going to yield actionable results for the business or marketing strategy?   Think about the answers when reading the question; will it help you define if your customers like the new feature(s)? Sure. Will it help determine if the new feature is right for your customers? Perhaps not. Questions, questions… Formulating questions that need to be answered, based on the research topic, is a problem waiting to be solved. As an insights agency, we encourage our clients to deliver us their questions monthly to be included in our omnibus. And our omnibus functions as a lean research tool for businesses that need quick results. Whether it is pre-determined market intelligence that requires questions developed to explore, or if you already have research questions that need answering, our consultants can help in the formulation and fielding of omnibus research that will yield relevant and actionable information.  But before you contact your market research provider, we’ve provided some hints you can use when coming up with your own research questions. Ask research questions that can be answered. Before starting to try to answer a question, it must first be determined whether there is the time or resources available to conduct the research in the first place. Let’s go back to our first example… Finding out which age groups engage with your product or what your customers want from the new features are questions that can be easily answered! But determining the factors of influence that led your customers to be interested in your product in the first place may not be (with this level of research, at least!). Ask one question at a time. Compound questions should be avoided. Asking questions around “if they use your product” and “at what times” may seem like a good place to start the survey, but asking questions like these at the same time or all at once will result in answers that are confusing and uninformative. It is always better to ask single, succinct questions to avoid confusing your customers. Review the research questions thoroughly. Before consulting your research provider, make sure to investigate with your developers to know how your product works, and with sales managers to know its selling points. While you consult your pros, you will still need to develop your own perspective that will help validate the need for your questions.   Be straightforward. If your responding customers do not know what the research question is asking, the response given won’t be of any use to inform the insights gathered at the end of research. Avoid the use of confusing words or language – keep questions as simple and as short as possible, and try to be specific about what it is that is being asked. Avoid research questions like, “Do you like to eat a lot?” Instead, stick to questions like, “At what times of day do you usually eat?” Being specific like this will lead to less confusion for customers, providing actionable market intelligence that relates directly to the research at hand. Provide restrictive and extensive response options. When setting up multiple choice research questions, be sure to make choices exhaustive (they cover all possible choices to the question asked) and restrictive (one answer cannot be mistaken for another by the respondent). In a question like, “What is your annual net income after taxes?”, an example of a restrictive and extensive series of responses could be: In a series of responses like this, virtually all possible options are covered and none of the answer categories can be said to overlap with the others. Setting up research questions so they are restrictive and extensive will not only provide a wide range of detailed data to work with, it will avoid biasing, or presupposing the answers respondents will provide before they are asked. Give your respondents an out. Some respondents may not feel comfortable answering all research questions. If inquiring about demographic information like household income, gender, etc., or looking to gather other sensitive information, it is often a good idea to provide a “Prefer not to answer” option to respondents. Giving responding customers an opportunity to opt out of questions will keep more of them answering (instead of dropping out entirely) and will limit them giving inaccurate responses only to proceed in the survey (resulting in unreliable data). On top of this, the number of those who preferred not to answer questions is still valuable data that can used in finding insight into the research topic. Balance the scale of available responses. Think long and hard about the scale upon which responding customers will answer survey questions. Points on scales should be equally distant from one another in concept or number from one another. Meaning - always avoid response scales that do not measure the same thing. If the question were to be asked, “How would you rate your experience with my company’s product?”, it doesn’t make sense to ask customers to rate their experience on a scale of 1 – Excellent. The first response is a number; the second is a feeling. Both are much different in concept, and using them both in the same scale would not just confuse responding customers, but it would also confuse the data gathered from their responses. If the research question requires a scaled response, stick to easy-to-use scales of one to ten, or scales that involve concepts that are very easily understood at first reading. Pitch your questions to a market research firm for consultation.  Now that you know what you want to research, and you have some great research questions ready to ask, it never hurts to call in a pro to validate the direction and scope of the research before committing to the investment of time and resources to the project. Market research firms like Insightrix are experts in their field and are both accessible and affordable to all levels of business. Whether to validate a specific project, or to inform a project from its beginning, engaging a market research firm at the outset for a consultation will result in more focused research (saving your business both time and money), and will provide more actionable data when the research is done.  What's more, when you access the experience of a market research firm, you'll be sure your research project is overseen by a third party, ensuring the project design and the data it produces are free from any bias - either real or imagined by others.  Doing good research is within reach Creating market research, formulating research topics, deciding on methodologies, crafting the perfect research questions, etc. can all be heavy lifting at first, but if you stick to the tips above, the process can be made much less arduous. Do you have a question or an idea for a research topic for your business? Insightrix OnTopic omnibus surveys allow any size or type of business to ask a research question affordably. Using either the SaskWatch or ManitobaWatch online research panels, the OnTopic service can ask your question or questions for you and provide you the intelligence your business needs at a fraction of the cost of undertaking a research project yourself – and benefit from the insight and survey design experience of seasoned pros. ...

  Trended data specific to Saskatchewan Since 2016, Insightrix has been tracking the use of social media by Saskatchewan residents and their social lives online to understand how they engage with one another and with brands and businesses, and to find out their preferences and the ways they use the platforms themselves. When the Saskatchewan Social Media Report (2016) was published – it was presented at workshops and conferences across Western Canada, and more than 200 marketers, business consultants, policy makers and advertisers downloaded the report or benefited from its insight. Many of those who accessed the report say they have used it to validate their marketing initiatives, and as a valuable tool for planning and strategizing.   For the first time, it was possible examine the ways Saskatchewan consumers (aged fourteen years old and older) interact with social media over mobile technologies and the internet, their attitudes toward social networks and their behaviours while using them - and what their preferences might be in the future. And even more important, it became possible to compare those statistics with trended data specific to Saskatchewan social media users. A useful narrative that you can understand  Now, those with interests in the province are able to examine Saskatchewan-specific usage data that have been trended over time and make comparisons to the historical story.  The value of this trended data is obvious when comparing Saskatchewan-specific social media usage data over time. In Saskatchewan, social media use has clearly increased since 2015. Back then, 83% of Saskatchewan residents said they used social networking sites - now, that number has increased to 90% of the people in the province over the age of 14! With evidence like this, it doesn’t take a genius to see that untrended data do not give the whole picture when it comes to social media usage statistics. New to the 2018 Saskatchewan Social Media Report The 2018 Saskatchewan Social Media Report has been slimmed down in terms of raw data and beefed up with digestible and thoughtful insight - and it's been repriced to be accessible to all levels of business in Saskatchewan. Dive into this rich, trended data and actionable insight to learn how the Saskatchewan digital landscape has changed over the years with visualized reporting and a clear narrative that you can understand and use right away. The 2018 Saskatchewan Social Media Report has also added a local chapter dedicated to Saskatchewan brands and how Saskatchewan social media users engage with them. Use the report to find out why residents are following local brands, which industries they are engaged in and what they are looking for in terms of advertisement and brand engagement.  ...

Customer experience programs are not a new concept It has been pretty much established that in any line of business, while your product or service may be what gets them in the door, what keeps your customers coming back again and again is the experience.  The customer experience landscape has shifted the way all B2C organizations manage their brand. This can include impeccable front-line customer service, ease of navigating your facilities (or digital assets), the user design of those facilities, etc. - and how that all ultimately ties back into your customer journey.  In fact, customer experience is not only the responsibility of one business area; it's something that should be managed across all levels of business.  In the beginning… Weirdly enough, customer experience measurement (or management programs) have existed in many forms over the years. From the first bazaar merchant who asked a customer if they could do better, to customer comment cards and the old school variant - the customer satisfaction survey - most of these older methodologies revolved almost exclusively around identifying customer touchpoints, or moments of contact between the business and the customer before and after their purchase. But, focusing almost entirely on increasing satisfaction at these points is a slippery slope, as it can lead to a distortion effect – data like this can lead companies to believe their customers are happier with the company than they really are.    It also takes emphasis away from the customer’s actual journey with the company, and magnifies the need to act on specific touchpoints.   For example, if your customer service representative asked one of your customers during a service call how satisfied she or he was with their interaction on a Likert Scale, the number your company would get back may not accurately represent the reality of the interaction. Say the customer gave a rating of 3 out of a possible 7 – was this dissatisfaction due to the interaction the customer had with the customer service representative? Or was the frustration due to waiting too long to talk to that representative, or was the hold music not to her or his liking, or was there something else entirely that led to the customer’s dissatisfaction? In these older customer satisfaction methodologies, who knows? There just isn’t enough qualitative data to find out what led the customer to be dissatisfied – the company just knows something is wrong. Today’s customer experience measurement programs go beyond simple quantitative assessment and look to develop answers to WHY the customer is satisfied or dissatisfied. This gives a much more holistic view of what’s actually going on in these customer interactions.   Rather than trying to make sense of numbers with no meaning, today’s CX methodologies allow organizations to worry more about managing the store than managing their score.   In other words, customer experience programs allows businesses to become more customer-centric as a whole. In fact, on a recent episode of Stories of Market Research: The Insightrix Podcast we interviewed Voice of Customer consultant, John Morton, to dig into the most common and critical issues many organizations have encountered in managing their customer journey, as well as some of the customer experience best practices successful companies share.  Identify stakeholders, not just shareholders… Building a customer-centric organization is about building relationships – and building relationships is done by showing customers you are listening.  Creating a customer-centric organization involves talking to stakeholders – those people, like your customers, who rely on the company, and not just its c-suite executives and board members.   This is why employee engagement surveys are one of the crucial elements in any CX program.   To get to the bottom of a customer’s journey, you must involve front-line staff who are a major part of that journey. It’s the front-line staff of the company who are in the closest relationship with the customer. Therefore, their input to the process isn’t just important, it is critical. Without direct lines of communication between the front-line and the boardroom, divisions and disconnects across business silos occur – often resulting in a less than optimal customer experience. According to the Harvard Business Review, “Even if a fix appears obvious from the outside, the root causes of poor customer experience always stem from the inside, often from cross-functional disconnects. Only by getting cross-functional teams together to see problems for themselves and design solutions as a group can companies hope to make fixes that stick.” Customer experience programs tie the front-line and the boardroom together, creating an organization that not only understands the touch points in their customer’s journey, but also understands what’s happening in the organization on the ground level and all other points along that customer’s journey, before, during and after purchase.   Go beyond customer service and extend to all levels and all areas of a business and focus on creating customer relationships, not just sales.   Address not just the shareholders of a company, but also that company’s stakeholders – bridge the gap between the boardroom and the point of sale. Ultimately, CX programs address your customer’s entire journey with the company, resulting in someone who is willing to come back, again and again… and again. Do you want to know more about customer experience programs? You can download this whitepaper – it describes the Insightrix Customer-Centric Experience Program (Insightrix CX). ...

Ad testing isn’t a thing of the past It seems like every time forward-thinking marketers bring up ad testing these days, they are dismissed by their older, set-in-their-ways colleagues.  Concerns of cost and timeliness, as well as the idea that ad testing (in nebulously described ways) diminishes the creativity of your advertising efforts are usually at the root of criticism of the practice. While it may have been true at one point – before strides in technology and methodologies were made – practical application has lifted the practice of ad testing out of focus group rooms of the nineties and back into common practice for forward-thinking marketers. This is because ad testing has evolved. While today’s innovating front-line marketers are fixated on the metrics to help justify their advertisement choices, their executives and stakeholders simply want results. Marketers believe ad results should be inherently data driven, but businesses are starting to see the need for their brands to be more daring and better represented in the media, so the expectation is much bigger than a marketer’s projected ROI.   New quantitative techniques and methodologies have been developed to create faster, more credible and more actionable quantitative testing protocols and to build and access deeper, more robust norms - making those criticisms mentioned earlier more than a little invalid and out of date. But is advertisement research really worth the effort? The short answer is...

Presentation of Market Research data remains a popular topic   In February of 2015, we published an article called 6 Creative Ways to Present Your Market Research Data that, before we knew it, became one of the most read and shared articles we’ve ever published. Fast-forward two and a half years, and that article is still doing well – still one of the most read and shared articles on our site. Which got us thinking that while the article still holds lots of value, some of the information in it may have gotten a little out of date in the intervening years. So, in the spirit of today’s Hollywood, we’ve decided to reboot it and make it more relevant to current audiences. Therefore, without further ado, we bring you – 6 Creative Ways to Present Your Market Research Data – The Reboot! Let’s get creative, people! With the large amounts of data that market researchers deal with, finding ways to present this information in a creative, interesting way can be a challenge. For years, some researchers have put the onus on the client when it comes to understanding, internalizing and actualizing their reports. Rather than providing concise reporting, in the past, many firms would data dump their clients with unwieldy and hard to follow reporting, thick with data and charts, and thin on actionable insight. There are better ways! Market research reporting can be interesting and assimilable! What follows are 6 creative ways you could be using to present your market research data. 1. Interactive Dashboards Interactive dashboards let you communicate important information to your audience. A dashboard is a visual display of the most significant information from a project. The information appears on a single screen, offering a quick and simple way to monitor and evaluate a study’s progress. Dashboards are a highly effective way to present data to executives who don’t have a lot of time and need to be able to check data at any point in a project. 2. Infographics Unless you’ve been living under a rock (or without an Internet connection), you’ve likely come into contact with lots of infographics over the last couple of years. They illustrate data and combine text, images and design to tell the story of a study. They have become exceedingly popular over the last few years since they present data in an engaging and easy-to-understand manner. Because the are so engaging and easy to grasp with little explanation, they are ideally suited to Internet and social media sharing. This boosts your chances for organic sharing. It’s because of this that Infographics are a great way to drive increased traffic to your website and highlight key elements of your data.   3. Presentation Software The days of coming to meetings with nothing but a few clip art-laden PowerPoint slides are way over (audible cheer!). If you want your data to stand out, try using out-of-the-box presentation software like Customshow or Prezi. These presentation platforms are a way to present information that engages audiences. They visually demonstrate how ideas relate to one another and allow collaboration in virtual space. Prezi and Customshow are cloud-based. So, you can present from your browser, desktop or tablet. Plus, you will always have the most recent version available. Presentation software like these offer visually engaging features such as zooming in and out of images and barrel rolls. This makes your insights both engaging and memorable.     4. Videos & Podcasts Sure, these formats are usually reserved for entertainment. They are also a great way to make your presentation more engaging. Podcasts [like the Insightrix Podcast] provide listeners an opportunity to immerse themselves in the narrative, or story, behind your research. They engage your audience in a way that offers you the opportunity to connect your research and your audience in meaningful ways and are relatively easy and inexpensive to attempt. Videos, on the other hand, let you put a face to your research and make study results more relatable and memorable. Vox pops (or streeter videos) are an effective way to bring research to life. They are video interviews with members of the public in which people speak on camera and tell the viewer what they think and how they feel about a particular subject. Videos and vox pops can supplement both qualitative and quantitative research. They are a compelling way to involve your audience in your research with minimal difficulty. *Pro Tip – Always make sure you have permission to film before setting up in any location.* #5. GIFs (Motion Graphics) GIFs, or motion graphics as they are sometimes called, are very short video clips. Though short, they can be a very impactful way to present your research by helping to create a story around your data. While they can be made up of video footage, they can also be used to create short, repeating slide shows of statistical data. Use of GIFs can help people understand difficult concepts and make your presentation more appealing. 6. Web & Mobile Apps   Everyone has a smartphone these days. As a result, apps are a great way to make your research more accessible to your clients. With a couple of quick taps of the screen, your clients can have access to your research at any time and at any place on their mobile devices. To top it off, the interactive nature of apps lets you control the research data you want to present. Like interactive dashboards, they can be out of the reach of most students and very small firms. That said, they are definitely worth the investment for small to medium firms looking to jazz up their presentations.     Presentation of Market Research Data can be engaging As you can see, presentation of market research data can be engaging - and it doesn't have to be rocket science getting it done. There are lots of other ways you can present your data. These examples are only a couple of ways we've found that have been especially well-received.  Can you think of other ways to present market research data?     ...

Have you ever asked yourself… How do successful companies build customer experience (CX) or user experience (UX) that keeps their customers coming back? What touch points are hooking these people?   Is it their advertising? It isn’t advertising – when was the last ad you remember for Facebook or Google? Is it their Website? In this case it can’t be their website – when is the last time you heard of a customer rave about a website as the reason they were happy with a brand? These successful companies don’t need to rely on their marketing – they rely on their users’ and customers’ behaviours to keep them coming back. They don’t rely on their brand to do the heavy lifting as consumers expect to be nurtured at every touchpoint.    How do you nurture these touch points? Think about it – when you miss your friends, you check Facebook. When you need to find something in a hurry, you Google it (you know you’re really creating a habit when your company name becomes a verb!). If you’re bored, you go to YouTube or Netflix for entertainment. These companies aren’t successful because they sell you on what they can do for you; they are successful because they have built customer engagement into their service offering – a engagement platform that is so successful that the customer experience becomes habitual to the users.   How do successful organizations habituate users?  One of the ways successful companies become habitual to users is through the development of a “hook” in their customer experience– a way to engage their customers that satisfies the customer’s needs. They provide a solution to their customers’ or clients’ needs with very little (or none at all) conscious thought required that, through use over time, prompts unsolicited customer engagement.     There are 5 questions you can ask to build a habitual Customer Experience: What do our clients/customers want? How is our product/service providing solutions to our customers’ problems? Why are clients/customers coming to us and not another company? What is the simplest way clients/customers can get the solution to their problem, and how can we make that process/action simpler for them? Are clients/customers finding their solution? Is there a way to leave them wanting more? What “work” do your clients/customers invest in your service/product? Does this work accumulate, leaving the product/service better each time with use?   Use Online Communities Imagine being able to get the answers to these questions without time consuming focus groups, but through fast, easily accessed and accurate quantitative and qualitative testing. Online communities are large panels of screened, invested individuals – individuals who can give you the answers with the targeted segmentation you need to improve your CX and develop a CXP that will keep bringing your clients and customers back. A great place to get started with your own online community is by taking a dive into our step-by-step guide in how to build a research community in under three days. These custom online communities’ solutions can provide answers to your burning questions just like those asked above. And if you’d like to learn more about how you can make your product or service more addictive, read Nir Eyal’s book, Hooked: How to Build Habit-Forming Products. It’s a great source for information on building habit-forming CX, and was great source material for this blog.   We recently developed a free whitepaper that deep dives into Customer-centric Experience programs driven by qualitative research techniques, click for more information:   ...

Customer Experience (CX) programs are constantly evolving past solely obtaining data to score or measure a persona or journey-type. To best create a customer journey map, your organization needs to Dive Deep into the different channels you use, all while learning to incorporate new-found insights into the program. Easier said than done, right!? Well… sort of. You must take the first step to capturing their customer experience – both the consumer and your client-facing employees – to make the customer-centric journey successful. To do this – simply – listen. Forming a deep understanding of your end-to-end customer experience is a powerful tool to enhance your competitive advantage. Your customers hold the key to your insights, and your client-facing employees can fill in the gaps in consumer understanding. Journey mapping can also help organizations employ techniques that are built to measure and that are designed effectively – and situationally – to help your executives “buy-in” to the CX “moments of truth”. So, knowing this -  how do professionals responsible for CX go beyond the standard approach of mapping only individual touchpoints? Let’s dive in. 1. The answer is in qualitative research Journey mapping is made through both customer research and employee understanding. And qualitative research assists by providing that “outside” perspective that should always include both the customers’ and employees' views. As a critical starting phase of any CX program (CXP), journey mapping – with the aid of qualitative techniques – should define the customer scope rather than the organization scope. Your customer’s journey should begin at the moment they interact with your brand – whether searching for your product online, engaging with a sponsored social media advertisement or visiting your physical store, you must acknowledge that the experience begins long before the traditional boundaries of the CXP. Customer journey studies are served well by multifaceted qualitative research methods.    At Insightrix, we build our CX framework as though each customer situation is different. It is our responsibility to report on insights - from many sources - including using innovative qualitative techniques such as online communities, online focus groups, employee insights and more. As a market research firm, we put together role-specific questionnaires and moderator guides to help bring clarity to the data findings and should ultimately help narrow the moments of truth in your customer’s journey.   2. Leverage Research Tools Research tools are an important part of any CX journey mapping toolkit. In order to get the most out of your framework, utilize tools that drive your methodology. By using interactive, rich media methods – your consumer is given an advantage when attempting to explain their experience. Qualitative techniques can benefit from a Market Research Online Community (MROC) platform. Online Communities allow CX professionals to easily consult with their customers and obtain the qualitative data they need to create a customer-centric customer journey map.   3. Use Solid Interview Questions Customer-centric journey mapping has gone beyond the use of closed-ended questions. Rather, it has evolved to incorporate targeted, open-ended questions intended to grasp the full pulse of the customer. Questions like these draw your customer out, and allow you to obtain qualitative data you can use to discover their key drivers and motivations. Solid interview questions provide verbatim to uncover and understand pain points in your CX and allow you to “close the loop” with dissatisfied customers.   4. A customer journey map connects organizations with customers CX measurement programs have evolved beyond obtaining data to create scores or measurement metrics. They have become customer-centric – focusing on the needs of the customer. They have progressed to where CX programs provide detailed maps of the entire customer journey. These customer journey maps speak to the qualitative experience of your customers, and allow organizations to Dive Deep into their customer’s journey.   We recently developed a free whitepaper that deep dives into ways to set up a successful and insightful Customer Experience Measurement Program for your organization:   ...