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Market research is a powerful tool for advocacy In an internet age, not-for-profit organizations should understand how important it is to adopt market research as advocacy to help inform their public interest initiatives. Because not-for-profits are vital to the local communities they serve, it is their shared responsibility to encourage policy and law makers to do what is right for the public. By using advocacy market research, not-for-profits can adopt a robust tool to put their cases forward and reach change agents in all levels of government.   This is research for advocacy in a nutshell. In most funding circles, advocacy is often considered an “art of persuasion”; it can be loosely defined as “converting the impossible into the inevitable”. Ask any campaign manager and they will tell you the same. The question is: How do campaign managers convert the impossible and reach the public to create more awareness and become relevant to policymakers?   Research for advocacy When we think of research for advocacy, some may think of decades of long, drawn-out research studies that show obscure connections between lifestyle and behaviour factors. And while some industry research can take many years to yield actionable results, research for advocacy can often be done MORE QUICKLY and can deliver information that is sometimes more relevant to policymakers. One way to get an advocacy message in front of the public is by undertaking and publicizing research that demonstrates the need for such laws or policies, the public support behind them and the likely results if the change were implemented. For example, as part of Tourism Saskatoon’s strategic plan, they identified the need to expand hosting capacity and to remain competitive for business and sporting events. For the past several years, the city of Saskatoon has seen on and off support for a new downtown arena and convention centre. Because Tourism Saskatoon ran a public opinion poll conducted by Insightrix to promote their advocacy message, they received media coverage to help grow support and validate their city planning initiatives. Insightrix worked with the Tourism Saskatoon on the question wording to ensure that the answers represented the views of the community, and were not leading, thereby ensuring credibility. This is an example of publicizing research that demonstrates the direct interest of the community. https://globalnews.ca/news/4101828/downtown-arena-tourism-saskatoon/ (media coverage) http://www.tourismsaskatoon.com/about/about-strategic-plan/ (strategic plan) What distinguishes research for advocacy from other types of evidence-based research is that it is focused on specific answers in mind, and that it is a part of an overarching strategy to influence potential policy development and policy change. While other research can contribute to the overall understanding of an issue, market research for advocacy has a narrow and specific aim, and it does not have to take a lot of time or money to be effective for advocacy campaigns.    Think like an NGO and run an Omnibus Poll Most NGOs conduct research in-house, but can use market research firms to help with validating or creating evidence for the larger research projects undertaken by these organizations. NGOs often use market research to “top up” their existing research by employing omnibus surveys and using locally-conducted research. Omnibus surveys often make good news, particularly if your research is interesting and shows potential for strong public support for the initiative at hand. Not-for-profits should monitor how NGOs conduct omnibus polling – as these kinds of research methodologies can be done easily and are inexpensive to conduct. At Insightrix, we run a monthly omnibus poll. Omnibus surveys are a quick and cost-effective, potent research tool that doesn’t break the bank. Our monthly omnibus sample is random and representative: we set quotas by region, age and gender to ensure the sample matches the distribution of the populations. When thinking about conducting an omnibus survey – keep two things in mind: your story should be newsworthy and contain something interesting that will catch people’s attention (or the attention of journalists), and it should also incorporate the advocacy message. Many NGOs have created media partnerships that have proven to be fruitful. With the internet becoming an important tool to promote timely research, low-cost media advocacy is an inexpensive way to increase your initiative’s chances for success, especially when it becomes news.   Getting an “in” with the media Using the media to get your advocacy research in front of the public is an effective way to secure better policies on a range of issues.  Cultivating relationships with journalists and local media can be difficult – that is, until you get your in with them. Media professionals are often on the look out for good ideas to write about for an article or to produce a segment for broadcast, and they pay close attention to press releases they receive. However, your press or media release itself is not the objective of advocacy; it is the effect of the news coverage that is important, and that may not always be easy to measure. One of the best ways to get your in with the media is to be analytical in your own observations of the media and their interactions with those you’re trying to reach. Attempt to understand what type of news is considered newsworthy - What appeals to readers? What issues gain little attention and which gain a lot? Are there local journalists who are more interested in social issues than others? Through your own research, you can see what gets covered in the media and how that information is presented. Doing this will create advocacy research that is desirable to media, that will be easier to digest and that will more than likely land you publicity for your initiative.   Use omnibus research to spur your advocacy efforts Media and research are two extremely valuable tools that can increase the awareness of your advocacy research and often require few resources other than the time and people to see them through. By using more advocacy to validate long-term research, by strengthening your relationship with the media (thereby building the understanding of the population), it will be much easier to influence the policies that matter to them most over time.  ...
 

Saskatchewan residents are concerned about the Canada/U.S. trade dispute. FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: JULY 20, 2018   In a new independent poll conducted by Insightrix Research Inc., Saskatchewan residents were asked if they are concerned about the U.S./Canada Trade Dispute and how much confidence they have in different leaders to do the right thing regarding world affairs.   Trade Dispute Perceptions Saskatchewan residents were asked which of the following statements reflect how they feel about the Canada-U.S. trade dispute. They could pick more than one statement. One half (50%) feel Canada is being bullied, 45% feel the relationship has been damaged but will repair itself over time and 44% feel they are prouder to be Canadian.  Q5: Which of the following describes how you feel about the trade dispute? Base: All Respondents, (n=805).  Overall, 87% of residents are concerned about U.S. President Donald Trump’s statement that the current U.S. and Canada trade dispute “is going to cost Canadians a lot of money” (note: this question is not graphed in this report but was asked to all respondents, n=805). As a result of the trade dispute, approximately 7 in 10 residents say they are likely to stop buying U.S.-made goods (70%), to stop or reduce travel to the U.S. (70%) and to not purchase goods from U.S. retailers in Canada (67%).  Q4. Because of this trade dispute, how likely are you to… Base: All Respondents, (n=805).   Support for Retaliatory Tariffs In total, two thirds (67%) of Saskatchewan residents support the retaliatory tariffs enacted by the Canadian government. Another 17% did not support the retaliatory tariffs, and 16% were unsure. Q8: Do you support or oppose the retaliatory tariffs enacted by the Canadian government? Base: All Respondents, (n=805).   Confidence in World Leaders Most Saskatchewan residents (80%) indicated they do not have much or any confidence in Donald Trump to do the right thing in word affairs, compared to 72% for Russian President Vladimir Putin. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau also received low ratings, with 61% of Saskatchewan residents having not much or no confidence that he will do the right thing. By contrast, German Chancellor Angela Merkel enjoys fairly high confidence levels, with 50% of Saskatchewan residents indicating they have a lot or some confidence that she will do the right thing regarding world affairs. This is followed by U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May (45%), French President Emmanuel Macron (44%), Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau (38%) and Chinese President Xi Jinping (30%). Q1. Please indicate how much confidence you have in each leader to do the right thing regarding world affairs. Base: All respondents, (n=805). *** Research Details A total of 805 randomly selected SaskWatch Research® panel members participated in the online research study between July 10 and 12, 2018. Surveys were distributed in English language format only. Quotas were set by age, gender and region to match the general population of the province; therefore, the data did not need to be weighted. Specific quotas included the following: The division of North and South are based on the first three digits of postal codes (FSAs) and is indicated by the red line in the map below: Age and Gender Quotas Since the research is conducted online, it is considered to be a non-probability proportion sample; therefore, margins of error are not applicable.  About SaskWatch Research® Insightrix began developing its SaskWatch Research online market research panel in 2007, using high quality techniques including telephone recruitment and referrals from existing panel members. Presently, there are over 18,000 active panel members, representing all regions of the province and distributions of the general population. Panel membership closely matches the 2016 Census, based on age, gender, household composition, household income and education. For more information, please visit: https://insightrix.com/saskwatch-research-online-panel-saskatchewan/ About Insightrix Research Insightrix is a dynamic, Western Canadian, full-service market research company. It exists to serve businesses and government entities with insights-driven research solutions, and interpretive analysis through leading-edge tools and senior-level expertise across a broad range of industries. Insightrix is based in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. For complete details visit:  https://insightrix.com/market-research-industry-blog/ About MRIA Gold Seal Insightrix is a member of the Market Research and Intelligence Association (MRIA) and adheres to the MRIA Code, which contains principles of professional practice in the conduct of our work. Our adherence to the Common Standards of Disclosure is our commitment to the high standard of ethics in our relations with research participants, our clients, the public and the market research industry. For complete details visit: https://mria-arim.ca/ For the complete press release, detailed tables and questionnaire visit here.  For more information, please contact: Insightrix Research Inc. Email: info@insightrix.com  Web: www.insightrix.com...
 

Episode 5 – Careers in Market Research concerns just that – the stories straight from market research. In this episode, we sit down with a panel of young research professionals who are a part of the Insightrix team to listen to their perspectives and points of view on what it’s like to be a young research professional working in the field of market research. These young research professionals offer up some of their unique experiences and perspectives as they have worked to begin their careers in MR, and some of the tricks of the trade they’ve picked up over their years on the job. They share some of the challenges they’ve faced and overcome, the skillsets and credentials that helped them secure their positions and to be successful in them and they give us an idea of what a day in the life of an MR professional looks like. If you’d like to put a face to the names you hear on our podcast, check out the extra bonus video we produced. It’s also available on the Insightrix YouTube Channel. We are also joined by Insightrix Research Director, Lang McGilp, for a chat about how market research has changed over the years in both practice and the tools used to do it. Lang also provides insight for young researchers looking to enter the field of market research in regards to the skillsets, education and specializations that will help them stand out when they look to pursue their new careers in market research. The newest episode of Stories of Market Research: The Insightrix Podcast is now available on our website player, and on the podcast listening application you like best: iTunes Google Music Stitcher PodBean  SoundCloud And all episodes are also NOW AVAILABLE on YouTube.   Check out past episodes of Stories of Market Research: The Insightrix Podcast Earlier episodes of Stories of Market Research: The Insightrix Podcast are also available on your podcast player of choice, as well as through the player on the Insightrix website.    Interested in learning more about how the worlds of market research and marketing collide and co-exist? Episode 4 of Stories of Market Research speaks to just that We’re joined in this episode by Insightrix Creative and Digital Strategist, Sharday Torgerson, as co-host for the episode. She shares her experience for a forthright discussion about how marketers use market research to better inform their marketing strategies and initiatives. We also discuss how and where the practices of market research and marketing inform one another. We also welcome marketing guru, Paige Gignac, Manager of Marketing and Communications for the United Way of Saskatoon and Area, and president of the Saskatchewan Professional Marketing Association (SPMA). She offers her perspective on the place of market research in marketing, as well as how marketers employ market research methodologies (like A/B testing) and gives reasons why marketers and marketing agencies should continue to employ market research firms. Are you interested in hearing about how market research can be used to gauge and affect the overall customer experience (CX)?   Episode 3 of the Insightrix Podcast is all about CX In our third episode, Market Research and the Customer Experience, we are joined by Market Research Professional, Jhumur Choudhury, as the co-host for the episode. She offers her experience and viewpoints for a chat about market research customer experience programs with our guest for the episode, John Morton, a voice of market consultant and expert in the field of customer experience management. John’s perspective on customer experience and Jhumur’s experience provide a great resource for those looking to learn more about emerging technologies, best practices and why customer experience programs are so critical to businesses of all kinds. You’ll probably also want to download this whitepaper about Insightrix Customer-Centric Experience Programs. It will help to fill in any blanks that may have been missed in our discussion of the topic at hand. How about an episode that speaks to how market research and the people who do it give back to their communities?   Episode 2 is all about corporate social responsibility in MR  In the episode, Market Research Gives Back, we discuss how market research and the skill sets and methodologies used therein can be used as a force for good with volunteers from Data for Good, a Canadian non-profit organization who gives back by volunteering their data science skills to non-profits, not-for-profits and NGOs. For Episode 2, we’re joined by phone from Toronto by Joy Robson, co-founder of Data for Good. Joy shares with us what the organization is all about and how it all got started. We’re also joined by the other co-founder of the organization, Geoff Zakaib, from his offices in Calgary to talk about how the Calgary Chapter of Data for Good held a Meetup in November of last year, and to give his thoughts on the movement of volunteering data science for good causes. Filling out the episode, founder of the Regina Chapter of Data for Good, Kevin Hayes, joins the podcast to talk about the challenges and pleasures of starting the newest chapter in the organization. You can contact Data For Good through their website. You can also reach each chapter individually through Twitter: Calgary Chapter: @DataForGoodYYC  Regina Chapter: @dataforgoodyqr  National Chapter: @Data_For_Good  But how about an episode that speaks about the changes in styles of reporting the market research industry has seen over the years? Episode 1 of Stories of Market Research is all about visual reporting in market research In our inaugural episode of the podcast, we speak with Ellen Eastwood, an independent research and insights consultant, instructor with the Marketing Research and Intelligence Association (MRIA) and research storyteller. During the podcast, we chat about the shift that has occurred over the past few years in the way that market research agencies have chosen to report their data to clients and to the public. Rather than the data-dumping style of reporting common in the last few decades, more and more market researchers and their agencies have chosen to adopt a more client-friendly approach to their reports. They have done this through developing reports that are more narrative in nature, telling the story of the data in ways that are actionable and understandable upon first reading rather than providing reports that leave clients with little more than charts and figures with little perspective on their importance. If you’d like to learn more about the MRIA, check out their website.   The Insightrix Podcast has you covered If you have an interest in market research (or any other field that crosses paths with it), be sure to subscribe to Stories of Market Research: The Insightrix Podcast and never miss an episode. It’s available on all of your favourite podcast apps, as well as iTunes, Stitcher, Google Music, PodBean and SoundCloud. And you can also find all episodes of Stories of Market Research: The Insightrix Podcast on YouTube. ...
 

Gauge citizen engagement - check in with the people who matter most Imagine you are a manager within a municipal department and/or provincial ministry. Now, imagine you are asked if citizens are aware of and satisfied with your department’s services, or perhaps if they have seen and can recall your department’s ad campaign.   Yikes!  How are you going to do this? How can you measure your success and get data to help in planning your next steps? OK – take a minute to breathe. It’s not really happening! This situation is fictional, of course. After all, this isn’t 1988. Today, you can easily get this data! However, budgets are tight and you need research that is not only timely, but that is affordable as well. Policy planning cannot be built on intuition. To do any good planning upfront or to validate those plans later, you need a pulse check to ensure initiatives or plans are on the right track - and any good plan has proper research behind it. How does omnibus research work? Government employees who employ omnibus research work together with research professionals to develop expertly crafted research questions to obtain the information they need. These research questions can be asked in one or two ways, either as closed or open-ended questions, depending on the kind of intelligence desired. Examples of closed questions Closed questions are designed to get a specific response from the population – either a yes or no answer, or perhaps a response to a multiple response question (one that asks for responses that involve picking one or more responses from a pre-determined list of possible responses). Example of an open-ended question Open-ended questions ask the population for a verbatim response, allowing for you to obtain citizen engagement in their own words. With the choice of either open-ended or closed questions, you have the choice of asking either qualitative or quantitative research questions – meaning there is virtually no end to the types of issues you can examine.   What kinds of market research are available to government managers? With omnibus research, you can obtain intelligence of almost any kind, and benefit from consultation with experienced researchers to ensure the survey is accurate and regionally representative. Measure citizen engagement and citizen participation in new or existing initiatives. Understand how initiatives have performed with the people who matter most – residents in your province or city itself. Provide needed information to inform stakeholders of the importance of a cause or issue. Answer objections that may be raised about a proposed policy change before rolling it out. Demonstrate popular support for a specific policy or program.   There are very few research topics market research cannot answer for governments. In the past, Insightrix has provided research insight on many policy and planning decisions. Awareness and usage of government services Recall rates of government advertising campaigns Satisfaction with specific government services Citizen opinion research relating to hot-button issues like the legalization of cannabis, anti-bullying policies, etc.   Government can do fast, lean research In times of shrinking budgets, the research budget is often one of those hardest hit. Maximize research budgets by employing omnibus research. Omnibus research allows you to do fast, lean, regionally representative research at a fraction of the cost of custom studies. How fast? Omnibus research allows for you to submit research questions and receive actionable data and insight back in just a few days. With the Insightrix omnibus service, you can begin a research project, put it into field and receive valuable insights back in only 7 days from beginning to end. How affordable? Omnibus research projects field multiple research projects together, all at once, at the same time every month. Combining questions from multiple research projects in a single survey increases government purchasing power by spreading costs across a larger sample. Choose the sample The Insightrix omnibus service, OnTopic™, allows you to choose the geographic location of interest. If you’d like to know about what people in Regina or Saskatoon feel about a specific topic to validate initiatives against the opinions and beliefs of those regions or against those of rural or northern demographics, OnTopic can accommodate. OnTopic allows for sample to be taken from either Saskatoon, Regina, southern Saskatchewan, northern Saskatchewan, or just one of these places - or all at once for the whole province. We set age, gender and region quotas to ensure the sample is representative of the area of interest. If you are a government decision maker in Manitoba, we’ve got you covered too. Insightrix OnTopic gets you regionally representative sample that is either specific to Winnipeg or province wide. How you use omnibus research is up to you. Are you interested in using omnibus research? The Insightrix omnibus service, OnTopic, is just an email or phone call away. Our experienced researchers and analysts are here to consult with you on the formulation of research questions, to put them into field and to assist in making the most out of the results. We run OnTopic once every month in Saskatchewan on the first Friday of every month, and we provide detailed tables that contain useful, actionable insights only a week later on the following Friday. We also do follow the same process in Manitoba, on the following week. Get the intelligence you need for a fraction of the cost of custom research projects.   ...