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Black Friday is here again - and Saskatchewan is ready for some sales. It used to be that Black Friday was an Americans-only event, with Canadians only able to get in on the deals by crossing the border and shopping in the United States. In the last decade or so, the shopping event has spread to Canadian retailers hoping to cash in on one of the biggest shopping days of the year. A similar story can be told about Cyber Monday – the first Monday after American Thanksgiving (November 27, this year) that has seen online retailers offer steep discounts to shoppers in an effort to siphon off some of the holiday sales that had formerly gone to brick and mortar retailers. By 2011, the shopping event had become entrenched in Canadian retail culture almost as thoroughly as Black Friday. Black Friday and Cyber Monday in Saskatchewan (historically) In 2015, Insightrix wanted to see how residents of Saskatchewan were participating in Black Friday and Cyber Monday. We ran a poll through our online community, SaskWatch Research, and we found that at that time, only 8% of Saskatchewan residents planned on doing most of their holiday shopping between Black Friday and Cyber Monday. In fact, most of the people polled (42%) stated they planned on doing the bulk of their holiday shopping between December 1-15. From this data, it wasn’t difficult to conclude that at this time, these shopping events hadn’t penetrated deeply into Saskatchewan retail culture. Black Friday and Cyber Monday in 2017 Insightrix was curious to see how these holiday shopping behaviours may have changed over time since the last time we looked into it. So, we ran another survey on the topic through our online community to see what, if any, changes had occurred. Fast-forward two years, and we see that behaviours around Black Friday and Cyber Monday have changed a great deal. Rather than the 8% who were planning on doing most of their holiday shopping between Black Friday and Cyber Monday in 2015, we found that 54% of those polled this year stated they would be doing at least some of their holiday shopping between those dates. Any guess as to why Saskatchewan residents have cottoned on to both of these sales events would be just that – a guess. One thing is certain, though, and that’s that Saskatchewan residents have included both Black Friday and Cyber Monday into their provincial retail culture. How much do residents expect to spend? Black Friday - A higher percentage of respondents (35%) who said they would be shopping Black Friday reported they expect to spend between $101-$250 during Black Friday sales. Twenty-six percent (26%) state they expect to spend between $251-$500 and another 21% said they expected to spend between $51-$100.  Cyber Monday – So, we then asked how much residents expect to spend during Cyber Monday sales and learned 30% of those who state they expect to participate in Cyber Monday sales expect to spend between $101-$250 online during Cyber Monday. Another 30% expect to spend between $51-$100, while 18% expect to spend between $251-$500. This holiday season, Insightrix is giving back by helping you give back! Do you want to be part of fun surveys like this one, or others that help you have your say in both business and political decisions in Saskatchewan? Head over to SaskWatch and register! Right now, SaskWatch Research and Insightrix are holding a promotion – Win free groceries for a month (up to $1000) and the opportunity to make a $1000 donation in your name to your local food bank. All you have to do to enter is register with SaskWatch! If you’re already a member, there are ways for you to win, too! Head over to the promotion Facebook page for rules and further information and sign up with SaskWatch today!  ...
 

Presentation of Market Research data remains a popular topic   In February of 2015, we published an article called 6 Creative Ways to Present Your Market Research Data that, before we knew it, became one of the most read and shared articles we’ve ever published. Fast-forward two and a half years, and that article is still doing well – still one of the most read and shared articles on our site. Which got us thinking that while the article still holds lots of value, some of the information in it may have gotten a little out of date in the intervening years. So, in the spirit of today’s Hollywood, we’ve decided to reboot it and make it more relevant to current audiences. Therefore, without further ado, we bring you – 6 Creative Ways to Present Your Market Research Data – The Reboot! Let’s get creative, people! With the large amounts of data that market researchers deal with, finding ways to present this information in a creative, interesting way can be a challenge. For years, some researchers have put the onus on the client when it comes to understanding, internalizing and actualizing their reports. Rather than providing concise reporting, in the past, many firms would data dump their clients with unwieldy and hard to follow reporting, thick with data and charts, and thin on actionable insight. There are better ways! Market research reporting can be interesting and assimilable! What follows are 6 creative ways you could be using to present your market research data. 1. Interactive Dashboards Interactive dashboards let you communicate important information to your audience. A dashboard is a visual display of the most significant information from a project. The information appears on a single screen, offering a quick and simple way to monitor and evaluate a study’s progress. Dashboards are a highly effective way to present data to executives who don’t have a lot of time and need to be able to check data at any point in a project. 2. Infographics Unless you’ve been living under a rock (or without an Internet connection), you’ve likely come into contact with lots of infographics over the last couple of years. They illustrate data and combine text, images and design to tell the story of a study. They have become exceedingly popular over the last few years since they present data in an engaging and easy-to-understand manner. Because the are so engaging and easy to grasp with little explanation, they are ideally suited to Internet and social media sharing. This boosts your chances for organic sharing. It’s because of this that Infographics are a great way to drive increased traffic to your website and highlight key elements of your data.   3. Presentation Software The days of coming to meetings with nothing but a few clip art-laden PowerPoint slides are way over (audible cheer!). If you want your data to stand out, try using out-of-the-box presentation software like Customshow or Prezi. These presentation platforms are a way to present information that engages audiences. They visually demonstrate how ideas relate to one another and allow collaboration in virtual space. Prezi and Customshow are cloud-based. So, you can present from your browser, desktop or tablet. Plus, you will always have the most recent version available. Presentation software like these offer visually engaging features such as zooming in and out of images and barrel rolls. This makes your insights both engaging and memorable.     4. Videos & Podcasts Sure, these formats are usually reserved for entertainment. They are also a great way to make your presentation more engaging. Podcasts [like the Insightrix Podcast] provide listeners an opportunity to immerse themselves in the narrative, or story, behind your research. They engage your audience in a way that offers you the opportunity to connect your research and your audience in meaningful ways and are relatively easy and inexpensive to attempt. Videos, on the other hand, let you put a face to your research and make study results more relatable and memorable. Vox pops (or streeter videos) are an effective way to bring research to life. They are video interviews with members of the public in which people speak on camera and tell the viewer what they think and how they feel about a particular subject. Videos and vox pops can supplement both qualitative and quantitative research. They are a compelling way to involve your audience in your research with minimal difficulty. *Pro Tip – Always make sure you have permission to film before setting up in any location.* #5. GIFs (Motion Graphics) GIFs, or motion graphics as they are sometimes called, are very short video clips. Though short, they can be a very impactful way to present your research by helping to create a story around your data. While they can be made up of video footage, they can also be used to create short, repeating slide shows of statistical data. Use of GIFs can help people understand difficult concepts and make your presentation more appealing. 6. Web & Mobile Apps   Everyone has a smartphone these days. As a result, apps are a great way to make your research more accessible to your clients. With a couple of quick taps of the screen, your clients can have access to your research at any time and at any place on their mobile devices. To top it off, the interactive nature of apps lets you control the research data you want to present. Like interactive dashboards, they can be out of the reach of most students and very small firms. That said, they are definitely worth the investment for small to medium firms looking to jazz up their presentations.     Presentation of Market Research Data can be engaging As you can see, presentation of market research data can be engaging - and it doesn't have to be rocket science getting it done. There are lots of other ways you can present your data. These examples are only a couple of ways we've found that have been especially well-received.  Can you think of other ways to present market research data?     ...
 

Who celebrated Halloween this year? It looks like it was a spooky one this year - roughly two thirds (66%) of the province planned on celebrating Halloween in 2017. That number breaks down demographically to show more females (72%) planned on celebrating than males (60%). Urban residents (74% in Saskatoon and 76% in Regina) also planned on celebrating much more than Saskatchewan residents living in the north (58%) and those who live in the south of the province (61%). People with one or more children (87%) planned on celebrating more than residents without kids (53%), and people of Indigenous ancestry (78%) planned on celebrating more than those who are not (65%). How did they celebrate Halloween? This year, the most popular ways people planned to celebrate Halloween were handing out candy (74%), taking the kids or grandkids trick or treating (49%) and decorating (45%). Some of the other popular ways people planned on spending the holidays were dressing up in a costume (36%), watching a scary movie or TV show (19%), dressing up their pets in costumes (13%) or going to a haunted house (13%). When it comes to costumes, men are spoil sports - only 30% saying they planned on wearing one at all. Forty percent of women, on the other hand, said they planned on wearing a costume for Halloween this year. Trick or treating – How old is too old for Halloween? There has been a lot of discussion about trick or treaters’ ages and whether there is an appropriate age for kids to hang up their masks for keeps. We thought we’d get an idea of how old is too old to be trick or treating. Most respondents (34%) agreed that 11-13 years old was the right time to retire the pillowcase. Others said that 14 years old (22%) is the correct age to stop, while 7% said 10 years or younger is just right. Another 7% said 15 is when kids should stop trick or treating, and 6% said that kids as old as 16 should be allowed to join in on the fun. Of note, the second most common response to this question (23%) was that people are never too old to trick or treat – so hang on to those old costumes! ZOINKS!!!!!! Since the season is a spooky one, we thought we ask a lighthearted question to break up the mood – little did we guess that the resulting responses would be so spine chilling. We asked Saskatchewan residents whether they had ever personally seen a ghost. As it turns out, 73% have not and 17% say they are unsure. Eerily, another 17% of the people of Saskatchewan have at one time or another, personally seen a ghost. Remember that next time someone asks you to grab something from the basement! Join in on the fun! Do you want to be part of fun surveys like this one, or others that help you have your say in both business and political decisions in Saskatchewan? Head over to SaskWatch and register! Right now, SaskWatch Research and Insightrix are holding a promotion – Win free groceries for a month (up to $1000) and the opportunity to make a $1000 donation in your name to your local food bank. All you have to do to enter is register with SaskWatch! If you’re already a member, there are ways for you to win, too! Head over to the promotion Facebook page for rules and further information and sign up with SaskWatch today!  ...
 

  Did you celebrate Thanksgiving this year? As it turns out, most Saskatchewan residents did enjoy Thanksgiving this year. In a recent Insightrix OnTopic poll, we found out 87% of Saskatchewan residents celebrated Thanksgiving. Kids enjoyed their share of the festivities. In fact, more people with children (92%) celebrated the holiday than people without kids (84%).     How did you celebrate Thanksgiving? People sure like to eat with their loved ones around these parts. When we asked Saskatchewan residents how they spent their Thanksgiving, by far, the most popular answer we received was to share a meal at home with friends or family. In fact, 92% of those  who celebrated the holiday reported this was the way they spent their Thanksgiving. Other popular responses were watching football (17%) and decorating one’s home (10%).   So you eat together – what do you eat? After learning 92% of Saskatchewan residents who celebrated Thanksgiving did it by having a meal with friends and/or family, it begs the question - just what was it that everybody ate? Of course, the answer came back turkey. Eighty-five percent (85%) reported eating turkey at Thanksgiving this year. The second most popular dish over the holiday was stuffing (76%). Where things get a little weird is how residents of the province take their gravy – more people in the province reported eating gravy over the holiday (75%) than mashed potatoes (74%). Now, you could surmise that extra 1% of gravy eaters prefer gravy only on their turkey and stuffing and not on potatoes, but still… Pumpkin pie is still a popular dish in the province for Thanksgiving dinner, with 68% saying they enjoyed a slice. Incidentally, pumpkin pie maintains its lead over its rival, apple pie, which was only eaten by 24% of those who celebrated Thanksgiving.   Thanksgiving appears to be alive and well in Saskatchewan The story the data told when all the results were tabulated was that Thanksgiving is a bit of a big deal in the province – at least for 87% of the residents of the province. What the other 13% got up to on the 9th of October, we can’t say – but you know they’ve got to be mad they missed out on all those turkey dinners. The survey was run between October 6 and October 12, 2017 and was made up of a representative sample (800 residents) of Saskatchewan residents.    WIN FREE GROCERIES! Do you want to be part of fun surveys like this one, or others that help you have your say in both business and political decisions in Saskatchewan? Head over to SaskWatch and register! Right now, SaskWatch Research and Insightrix are holding a promotion – Win free groceries for a month (up to $1000) and the opportunity to make a $1000 donation in your name to your local food bank. All you have to do to enter is register with SaskWatch! If you’re already a member, there are ways for you to win, too! Head over to to the Facebook contest page for rules and further information and DON'T forget to sign up with SaskWatch today! ...