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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: July 20, 2017 In a recent independent poll conducted by Insightrix Research Inc., 39.8% of Saskatchewan residents state they have little or no understanding of the provincial and federal fire codes and regulations. Another 54% state they hold a basic understanding of fire codes while only 6.2% claim to fully understand fire codes and regulations. Higher proportions of women (44.9%), compared to men (34.5%), state they have little or no understanding of the provincial/federal fire codes and regulations. Despite the lack of understanding, overall, a strong majority of residents (91.6%) state they feel safe from fire in their homes. Only 8.4% claim they do not feel safe from a fire in their home. Feelings of safety from a home fire tend to increase with age as 94.8% of those aged 55 and older state they feel safe, compared to 88.4% of those aged 18 to 34.  Among residents who rent their dwelling, 67.4% believe their rented property meets fire safety codes and regulations. Another 12.5% believe their rented dwelling does not meet the codes/regulations while 20.1% are unsure. Perceived in-home fire management among home owners The majority of Saskatchewan residents who own their homes (92.8%) feel fire safety in their home is well managed (either somewhat or very well). However, the remaining 7.2% feel at home fire safety is poorly managed (either somewhat or very poorly). Sentiments are largely consistent across demographic variables. Again, among residents who own their homes, 83.8% feel they carry enough fire insurance for their dwellings. Another 3.4% believe they do not carry enough while 12.8% are not sure. Interesting to note, 88.4% of men feel they have enough home fire insurance, compared to 79.2% of women. Further, older respondents (89.3% of those aged 55 and older) feel they carry enough fire insurance, compared to only 75.9% of those aged 18 to 34. *** Research Details A total of 807 randomly selected SaskWatch Research® panel members participated in the online research study on July 12 through 14, 2017. Quotas were set by age, gender and region to match the general population of the province. Since the research is conducted online, it is considered to be a non-probability proportion sample and, therefore, margins of error are not applicable. About SaskWatch Research® Insightrix began developing its SaskWatch Research® online market research panel in October 2007, using high quality techniques, including telephone recruitment and referrals from existing panel members. Presently, there are over 15,000 active panel members, representing all regions of the province and distributions of the general population. The panel membership closely matches the 2011 Census based on age, gender, household composition, household income and education. For more information, please visit http://saskwatch.ca. About Insightrix Insightrix is a dynamic, Western Canadian, full-service market research company. It exists to serve businesses and government entities with insights-driven research solutions and interpretive analysis through leading-edge tools and senior-level expertise, across a broad range of industries. Insightrix is based in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada.  For more information, please contact Dylan Cody, Senior Research Associate Insightrix Research Inc. Tel: 306.657.5640 ext. 238 Email: dylan.cody@insightrix.com Web: www.insightrix.com...
 

In an era where every Internet user has a journey to share and is the storyteller of their own immediate world – the question is – how often does your brand take into consideration that it needs to do the same?  In business, we often interpret the act of purchasing products as a purely transactional experience – one that is solely between a business and its consumer. It is rare that a brand superimposes its ability to sell you a human experience past why their product is made for you. Too often, their marketing ensures how the offering will ultimately give you a better lifestyle experience, yet few rarely provide a narrative experience for the human in you. But times they are a changin’, as Dylan sang. Take this for example - no lies - I nearly shed a tear while watching a Duracell commercial. https://youtu.be/tSlUH2WmkYA That’s it folks – a battery commercial tugged on my heartstrings and it had me thinking: How…. but why…. BUT HOW? Well – to put it simply – the brand told me a story I could relate to and the "offering" was humanized as a story...
 

In a recent Insightrix article on neuroscience, we discussed the trend of neuromarketing, or as preferred for our purposes, using neuroscience tools and methodologies in the field of market research. Aside from leaving many wracked with existential dread, the article on neuroscience raises a few questions about how the processes described in the post actually work and how they are useful in the field of market research. If you haven’t yet, you may want to give it a read, as it will fill in any blanks from this post and tell you why this is relevant to market research. As Insightrix is all about providing answers, we decided to write another blog article to talk about it and provide some clarity regarding the ways neuroscience is used in market research. In the last post, we mention EEG, eye tracking and facial coding, so we’ll go from there. EEG (Electroencephalogram)  EEG (electroencephalogram) can be a powerful addition to the toolkit of market researchers. In the field of market research, EEG biosensors are used to measure changes in participants’ brain activity to try to track changes in participants’ levels of attention to what they are seeing and/or hearing. With interpretation, this can be a useful tool for researchers wishing to know what parts of their content (video/commercial/film/etc.) held an audience’s attention best, and where that audience’s attention strayed from their message. EEGs monitor changes in the electrical activity in the brain and allow researchers to measure changes in the levels of attention participants  experience when viewing and/or listening to content (video/advertisement/movie clip/etc.), or when trying a new product. Theoretically, when attention is high, electrical activity in the brain increases, and when attention is low, electrical activity falls. With data derived from this process, market researchers can discover what points of the experience were most interesting (held participants’ attention), and what parts caused attention to drift. EEG biosensors are relatively small and, as a result, they are portable. This means marketers can use them almost anywhere (stores, theatres, wherever) to get responses and data in natural settings.   Eye Tracking    Now that you are armed with the understanding of what your participants’ attention levels are doing, you’ll need to have some kind of way to find out where that attention is being directed. That’s where eye tracking comes in. Eye trackers are usually portable, multi-camera apparatuses that track participants’ eye-movements (of course), how long something is looked at and (in some models) even track the number of times a participant blinks. The data generated from this lets market researchers know just where participants are looking, and for how long they looked at it. Many eye trackers are extra useful, in that they come with software that allows researchers to designate specific elements in the test material to see how many times a specific field was looked at, and how long and how many people looked at it. This can be very useful if you want to know how noticeable a brand logo or your visual messaging is. Data from eye trackers is represented with the help of some handy and sophisticated software in graphic visualizations. Generally, these visualizations can be in the form of Heat Mapping, Bee Swarms (no, not real bees) and/or Gaze Plotting. If you want to see what this looks like, check out the video attached to this post.  Like EEG biosensors, eye trackers are relatively inexpensive and can be set up almost anywhere – some can even be attached to laptops or phones.When used in conjunction with other neuro tools and tried-and-true techniques like in-depth interviews and focus groups, eye trackers can provide very powerful data.  Facial Coding Now that you think you understand at what points your participant is interested and attentive, and to where and at what your participant is looking, it would be nice to have some idea about what your participant might be feeling in regards to what she is looking at. This is where facial coding can be useful. Facial coding uses existing facial recognition technology (like the kind they use to track down criminals or create matches on dating sites) to try to learn about participants’ emotional state in relation to test materials. With cameras and some really complicated software, researchers try to detect seven basic, universal emotions in participants. These emotions have been proven through a great deal of testing and re-testing (of the scientific kind) to be associated to seven basic facial expressions (disgust, delight, sadness, skeptical, surprised, fear and negative emotions like anger). These facial expressions are universal and are the same in everybody, regardless of age, culture or ethnic background. It is hoped that using facial coding technology as a tool in market research can allow researchers to read their participants’ emotional responses before they are able to rationalize them into thought and words. The goal is to give an impression of the knee-jerk responses your test materials engender in observers – data that is useful if you want to know if your product is being well received or not. And there it is… There you have it – some of the most common tools used in the field of neuroscience, and particularly, in neuroscience as it employed in the field of market research. It doesn’t take a degree in neuropsychology or neurobiology, or even one in marketing, to understand how, when put together with the other tools described in this article and adept interpretation, combined with tried-and-true market research methodologies like in-depth interviews and focus groups, can come together to make a powerful toolkit for market researchers. With that said, these techniques require a caveat when used in market research in that they are useful and appropriate only in specific settings. The human mind is ridiculously complex, and attempting to understand its processes through machines can produce less trustworthy data if well-defined and rigorous research design is not put in place. Most market researchers who employ neuroscience methodologies advocate their use in conjunction with tried-and-true market research methodologies like focus groups and/or in-depth interviews. If you’d like to understand more about why neuroscience in market research is used in the first place, check out this article about just that. Keep checking back to the Insightrix blog regularly for updates on how Insightrix uses neuroscience and other cutting-edge techniques and methodologies in its own client projects.     Sources: neursky.com/neuromarketing-and-eeg-measuring-engagement-in-advertising scholar.google.ca/ijps/article lcbr-online.com/index_files/proceedingsemc12 greenbookblog.org/neuromarketing-identifying-the-fact-from-the-fiction/...
 

Trying to figure out millennials and how to market to them effectively has been quite the topic of discussion of late. Actually, every time we are on the cusp of a new generation set to become the primary purchasers in Canada, we flock to their archetype and often attempt to exploit it. But it seems nobody can get a handle on who these millennials are and what they are all about. What a typical millennial problem… According to StatCan, this demographic makes up a significant portion of the population of Saskatchewan – not only that – but we actually have more young people, per capita. So… shouldn’t there be a way to understand their media habits and ensure advertising can effectively target them? This head-scratcher is often brought up at Insightrix in attempt to better segment younger users and learn their media behaviours (This is similar to what we've recently accomplished for a favourite CFL brand, the Saskatchewan Roughriders). To better understand millennials and their media behaviours, Insightrix recently examined its Saskatchewan Digital Democracy syndicated series, which answers questions like:  What social media platform is most popular among teens, millennials, gen-X'ers or baby boomers in Saskatchewan? How many residents are engaging with more than one social platform, and if so, which ones? The syndicated study measures media usage among generations, including determining the ways people in Saskatchewan connect and their preference of social media platforms like Facebook, Snapchat, Twitter or Instagram. This syndicated study continues our ongoing Saskatchewan Data Insider Series which tracks how Saskatchewan engages online.  If you’re interested in a teaser report outlining how, access it free here.   When it comes to individuals aged 26 to 31 in the province - 97% use social media of some kind. Here's a breakdown of social media usage by millennials: Though you might not guess it - believe it or not - most millennials believe they spend too much time on social media, while 42% say the time they spend on these sites is, “about right”. Only 1% said they believed they should spend more time on social media: Not only that, but more than half of SK millennials (54%) claim checking their phone is the last thing they do before bed.  Because millennials think they spend too much time on social media, it can said that over promoting to this group has its drawbacks because of the over exposure it may cause. Millennials are the group that is more likely "hide" your social media promotions if they crowd their news feeds.  Do you think millennials are easy or hard to market to?    Syndicated Series In our syndicated report, you’ll find further information about social media usage of millennials in Saskatchewan, as well as media habits across other age demographics. This data can inform your advertising efforts, giving you a valuable addition to your marketing toolkit. For a social media snapshot, access your free eBook and get highlights from the syndicated report. Or, even better, purchase the entire report and gain an understanding of the media habits of Saskatchewan residents across all age demographics.  ...