fbpx

PRESS RELEASE: September 23rd, 2016 Saskatchewan Residents Overwhelmingly in Favour of Increasing Regulations for Pet Businesses The Animal Protection Act Awareness and Specific Provisions Two-thirds (68%) of Saskatchewan residents are aware that Saskatchewan has an Animal Protection Act.  Residents were asked if they support or oppose increasing specific regulations within the Act and overall, a strong majority support increasing regulations. Specifically, 88% of Saskatchewan residents support the idea that the definition of “distressed” in the Act should be expanded to include emotional and psychological suffering of an animal (53% strongly support, 35% somewhat support).  Residents with a pet are more likely to strongly support this concept (57% vs. 47%). Residents were also asked if they support the inclusion of other specific provisions in the Act.  Overall, 97% of Saskatchewan residents support including specific provisions that would require veterinarians who suspect animal cruelty to report their suspicions to the appropriate enforcement agency in their community.  Ninety-eight percent (98%) support including specific provisions that prohibit animal fighting and the same proportion support including specific provisions that all sexual contact with animals is a violation of the Act. Kennel Regulations At present, there are currently no specific requirements for kennels in Saskatchewan. Rather, the Act refers to a code of practice that Canadian kennel operators can choose to follow.  Respondents were asked if they support increasing regulations in the Act to include mandatory standards of care for kennels as well as other pet businesses. A strong majority of respondents support the introduction of mandatory standards of animal care for kennels, breeders, animal shelters, animal rescues, pet training services and pet grooming services within the Act, as outlined below: Residents with a pet are slightly more inclined to strongly support having mandatory standards of care for all of the above mentioned pet businesses. Also, at present, the Animal Protection Act only allows animal protection officers to enter non-residential premises without a warrant in cases “where animals are kept for sale, hire or exhibition”.  Under this definition, kennels and other pet businesses are excluded.  Respondents were asked if they would support changing the Act to allow animal protection officers to enter and inspect any animal-based business in Saskatchewan without a warrant.  Overall, 92% of residents support this notion (66% strongly, 26% somewhat). Residents with a pet are slightly more likely to strongly support this change (69% vs. 61%). Concerns with Saskatchewan Kennels The majority of Saskatchewan residents (82%) are aware that 14 dogs recently passed away at a kennel in Saskatoon. Among pet owners, nearly all (83%) state they are now more concerned (50% much more concerned, 33% somewhat more concerned), about leaving their dog at a kennel overnight in light of this tragedy. Saskatchewan Residents and their Pets Of Saskatchewan pet owners, 95% agree, (77% strongly, 18% somewhat), that their pet is part of their family. Another 77% agree (42% strongly and 35% somewhat) that their pet is their best friend, and 75% agree (43% strongly and 32% somewhat) that they treat their pet like a child. In addition, 93% of respondents (69% strongly and 24% somewhat) agree that animals have emotions and feelings that should be respected.  Another three quarters (73%) agree that animals deserve the same rights as humans (with 33% strongly agreeing and 40% somewhat agreeing). Research Details A total of 801 randomly selected SaskWatch Research® panel members participated in the online research study on September 20th and 21st, 2016. Quotas were set by age, gender, and region to match the general population of the province. Since the research is conducted online, it is considered to be a non-probability proportion sample and therefore, margins of error are not applicable. About SaskWatch Research® Insightrix began developing its SaskWatch Research® online market research panel in October 2007, using high quality techniques including telephone recruitment and referrals from existing panel members. Presently, there are over 15,000 active panel members representing all regions of the province and distributions of the general population. The panel membership closely matches the 2011 Census based on age, gender, household composition, household income, and education. For more information, please visit http://saskwatch.ca. About Insightrix Founded in 2001, Insightrix Research Inc. is a full-service market research firm that helps clients develop, administer, and manage data collection and information strategies. From its office in Saskatoon, Insightrix offers a comprehensive range of research services.  For complete details on our recent polls, please refer to: https://insightrix.com/market-research-industry-blog/   For more information, please contact Lang McGilp, Senior Research Executive Insightrix Research Inc. Tel: 306.657.5640 ext. 229 Cell: 306.290.9599 Email: lang.mcgilp@insightrix.com Web: www.insightrix.com...
 

Get CX like Starbucks Have you ever wondered how a company like Starbucks got to be so good at customer experience (CX)? We have found that a key to great customer experience comes through active and engaged brand communities that are able to provide dialogue between the customer and business, which fuels innovation and change. This innovation can come in the form of a new product or service that was needed but perhaps overlooked by management. While many businesses are not using engaged brand communities, we believe the question is no longer why should a company use online communities, but rather when will they start using an online community? We looked at the mega coffee chain Starbucks, who has been leading the way in its use of online communities, and who has reaped the rewards of this technology. Although many see Starbucks as extremely successful, history has not always been cake flavoured latte for them, in fact, there was a time when their growth was in decline and they were having to close stores. Click here to read full blog....
 

When a luxury car company experiments with a technology like online communities to help gather market research and continues to expand year after year with that technology, you must conclude it is paying off. That is what happened with Mercedes-Benz who first began using online communities in 2008 with Generation Benz. Generation Benz was created to engage Generation Y customers. The community was created as an invite-only forum and allowed members to gather around their love for the brand. Generation Benz also collected insight into the thoughts, and lifestyle of this particular demographic allowing the brand to help position the company to market more effectively to this age group. The luxury car brand has since began implementing online communities around the world. Interested in the full blog? Click here. Interested in this topic? Check out these articles: Air New Zealand is Bringing Sexy Back! http://insightrixcommunities.com/air-new-zealand-bringing-sexy-back/ Starbucks' Open Sourced Customer Experience Idea http://insightrixcommunities.com/starbucks-open-sourced-customer-experience-idea/  ...
 

It can be difficult to build engagement in your online community The most commonly asked question that we hear is how can a company build engagement in their online communities? We see it time and again, a company decides to get a community, and they see high levels of excitement within the management, people are signing up daily to join the community and then a few months pass by and the engagement stagnates or worse begins to drop off. Don’t worry, this happens to the best communities. There are steps a company can take to foster engagement and keep it going strong, and methods you can employ to bring your numbers back up. We came up with a list of our top five ways to build engagement in your online community. Click here to read full blog....
 

Customer Experience Matters in Online Communities While researching and writing this article, I decided to Google “Customer Experience and Communities.” What I found is that while companies and corporations are using buzzwords like customer experience (CX) or user experience (UX), that many companies still don’t walk the talk. While clicking through the links, I came upon one page that had a pop-up bubble for a live chat. I responded that I was just looking for articles about customer experience, expecting a reply. After a minute of no reply, I saw at the top of the screen that the individual who was in charge of the online chat hadn’t been online for a week. Immediately I clicked out. The second was a company that sold online community software and had a 3 paragraph blurb about customer experience but then wanted me to fill out my personal information before allowing me to read more about what they had to say in regards to customer experience. I clicked out. The reality is that customer experience is a word that everyone seems to think is important but upon deeper reflection seem unclear as to the how and why. We believe that good CX is important because a pleasant experience translates to sales, repeat sales, and expanding your brand through word of mouth referrals. We believe that one of the best ways on how to improve the CX is through online communities. Click here to read full blog....
 

Product Development Insights Last week I was shopping with my 12-year-old relative who is a smart, active, sixth grader who enjoys spending her time dancing. Her mother is also very active, and enjoys yoga and like any yogi knows, Lululemon is the go-to store for yoga active wear. Lululemon went on to open a store where children under the ages of 14 could get their own active wear, called Ivivva. The store offers such activities as parent-child yoga classes on Saturdays at the store. We went into the store, and I was thoroughly impressed. What I found out after leaving the store shocked me even more. As we left the store, she told me that she had sent in suggestions for design. Like anyone involved in insight communities my interest was immediately peaked, since product development is a major strength of insight communities.   Click here to read full blog....
 

Rebranding can be a necessary step in changing the trajectory of a company. However, it does come with some measure of risk. Rebranding when done right seeks to take the successful aspects of a company’s service or product and carry those forward into the future, while shrugging off the failures of the past. Problems arise when the management in charge of the change fail to consult and test with the target audience. It seems rather simple, yet time and again you hear of case after case where the management seems satisfied, fails to consult with the intended audience and suffers accordingly. Take the example of the article we ran a while back on Rhode Island’s failed rebrand attempt. We believe that online communities can provide the support needed to make a rebrand go right, as they provide a space for the continual testing of products and services, with the target audience. In an article written by Michaela Mora entitled How to Avoid Rebranding Mistakes she recounts her time as Director of Research for Blockbuster online and how focus groups proved crucial for the rebranding process. Click here to read full blog....